Strict Overhead Press - weak off the shoulders

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Frenzy1, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. Frenzy1

    Frenzy1 White Belt

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    What should I be working to get stronger on the Strict Overhead Press, specifically coming off the shoulders? Lowering the weight and doing more presses or is there something I can do to strengthen that part of the lift? Usually if I try heavy weights I can at least get it up to where the triceps take over and force it up but if I try even 5 or 10 pounds more it just feels overwhelming and I can't get it up more than a couple inches.
     
  2. flak

    flak Guest

    I've been dealing with the same thing. One thing I'd suggest is, play around with the frequency of your SOHP workouts.

    Question-- how often are you doing them?

    I had assumed that because The Nerd King said bench press responds well to frequent workouts, the same would be true for SOHP. That wasn't the case for me. I seem to make the best progress when I space out my SOHP workouts so there's about 5 days in-between.

    Another tip -- try to press the bar up explosively. That is, don't aim for a steady press upward, try to drive the bar up off your chest as fast as possible. That helps me a bit.

    Also, have you seen the Rippetoe videos on SOHP form? If not, lemme know and I'll post 'em.
     
  3. TKMaxx715

    TKMaxx715 saggy pants

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    whiskey will do that to you.

    My theory is is that if you are weak at doing something, then do that to get stronger at it. If you are trying to make the bottom portion of your lift stronger then just lower the weight a little bit and just do reps in the in the range of motion that is weak for you. So... drop the weight a bit and do short explosive lifts without locking out.
     
  4. fat_wilhelm

    fat_wilhelm Black Belt

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    Overload the eccentric.
     
  5. flak

    flak Guest

    Seriously? Like, put the j-hooks up at full extension height, load the bar with 1RM plus 10 or 20 lbs. and do controlled eccentrics?

    That's intriguing, never thought of it.

    Or are you kidding? Hard to tell.
     
  6. ThinkGreen

    ThinkGreen Der √úbermensch

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    You could also try some DE stuff... do something like 8 sets of 3 reps with 70-75% of your 1rm, and move the weight as explosively as possible.
     
  7. hunto

    hunto Brown Belt

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    Heavy shrugs.
     
  8. BlondeWarrior

    BlondeWarrior Green Belt

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    If you want to be better at OHP, then OHP more. :wink:

    Also, one thing that I've noticed has helped is use dumbbells and pause at the bottom for ~3 seconds on your reps, also you can do a 2 minute set of presses, where you hold it at the bottom for 10s then quickly do an explosive press, then back down for 10s.
     
  9. Ascendant

    Ascendant <img src="http://i543.photobucket.com/albums/gg474

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    One thing I'll do is start the lift with a shoulder shrug. So stand in position, bar held in catch, and shrug violently upwards with your shoulders to get the bar moving, then let the shoulders/triceps/etc. take over and finish the lift. It's a great way to un-stick, so to speak, the weight from your chest.

    Try it and let me know what you think.
     
  10. Brand Nizzel

    Brand Nizzel Guest

    Do you guys think I should incline bench press today or strict OHP?

    I've never done seated strict OHP as the core lift for the day and worked for my max on it...just did it with clean and presses

    I guess that means I should do OHP then right? haha
     
  11. Brand Nizzel

    Brand Nizzel Guest

    Is there a difference between SOHP and the military press? Is SOHP always standing?
     
  12. gza

    gza Banned Banned

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    i hate incline press :(

    OHP is win
     
  13. EZA

    EZA Joel Jamieson

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    OHP is very hard on the shoulder joint, I wouldn't advise doing a whole lot of it, at least not very heavy, if you're also training in MMA. Over the long run it will increase your risk of impingement and it's not exactly a movement patter that is particularly important in MMA or many sports anyway.
     
  14. gza

    gza Banned Banned

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    dont mean to hijack, but i was doing side raises the other day and felt shoulder clicking. no pain, just clicking. that'll disappear i hope, yes? i googled it and it just said its your socket rolling around and it'll eventually correct itself
     
  15. takeahnase

    takeahnase watching the swarm

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    Do bench presses contain a movement pattern that is more specific to MMA?
     
  16. arctic82

    arctic82 Orange Belt

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    Eza propably ment that in mma shoulders are under pressure allready, and many athletes might find pressing movements aggrevating the shoulders even more... then again if they strengthen their shoulders would that repair the issue and prospone the injuries?
     
  17. takeahnase

    takeahnase watching the swarm

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    EZA made two distinct statements. First, that OHP is hard on the shoulder joint and second, that OHP is not a movement pattern that is replicated in MMA or many other sports.

    From the second statement it appears to follow that strength exercises should attempt to replicate movement patterns found in the sport the athlete competes in. If this is indeed the case, then it would interest me what movement patterns in MMA the bench press replicates or what other pressing exercises should be used for athletes for which neither bench nor OHP make sense.

    If the bench press does not really replicate movement patterns either, but is considered a better upper body pressing exercise because of lower risk of injury or whatever, ok. But then the statement with respect to movement patterns of the OHP is irrelevant.
     
  18. ghostwipe

    ghostwipe Black Belt

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    This is great, I'm going to try it.
     
  19. w0cyru01

    w0cyru01 Purple Belt

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    where your feet are

    yes it should be done standing as well to strengthen the core

    incline presses are twice as hard on my shoulders as ohp
     
  20. Revok

    Revok Brown Belt

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    All the impressive SOHP vids I've seen feature the lifter initiating practically from the hips, hinging the torso forward and lurching the shoulders up to start the bar moving (see: the one where that French geezer puts 500lbs above his head). I guess it comes down to just how strict you want your strictness. My conception of SOHP just means incorporating absolutely no knee or ankle bend, though anythign else I can do to generate vertical motion is kosher.
     

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