Pivotal Moments: Dillashaw vs Barao pt 2 ( technique breakdown)

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Discipulus, May 29, 2014.

  1. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    Hey guys, this is the second part of my analysis of TJ Dillashaw's incredible win over Renan Barao last weekend. Let me know what you think!

    Pivotal Moments: Dillashaw vs Barao, part 2

    The signs were there in Dillashaw's fight with Easton, but it was hard to believe that one of the "lesser" members of Team Alpha Male would find success at the championship level when the bigger names, Joseph Benavidez and Urijah Faber, had each failed in consecutive title shots, Faber to the very man that Dillashaw was set to face. As if driven to greater heights by this doubt, Dillashaw fought Barao with a chip on his shoulder, and a pair of highly coordinated rabbits in his feet, crushing the pound-for-pound great en route to a satisfying knockout in the fifth round.

    Today we're breaking down rounds 3 through 5 of this historic bout. Join me in admiring TJ Dillashaw and trainer Duane Ludwig's masterpiece.

    This is Pivotal Moments: Dillashaw vs Barao.

    Miss part 1 of this article? You can find it right here.

    ROUND THREE


    In one sense round two was a mixed success for Dillashaw, as he ate a number of punches and kicks from Barao and likely scraped by on mostscorecards on the momentum of the first round alone. On the other hand, Dillashaw proved to Barao that he could take his best punches and keep coming forward. If anything, the champion's successful offense seemed to remind Dillashaw to fight strategically, as he came out in the third round with an imposing, patient approach.

    Perhaps the most striking thing about Dillashaw's performance was how composed he was standing in front of Barao. Even stone-faced Eddie Wineland and the gunslinging Brad Pickett wilted somewhat upon realizing what kind of fighter they were in against, but Dillashaw was supremely confident.

    Some of that must be attributed to Duane Ludwig, who equipped Dillashaw with an immense bag of tricks. Ludwig calls Bang Muay Thai a "system," not a style, and he teaches it as such. That means no guesswork, and no frustration. When Barao began stymying Dillashaw's offense with wild punch combinations, Dillashaw had an answer for him, and the answer was handfighting.

    [​IMG]
    GIF

    1. Dillashaw stalks forward in a southpaw stance, gripping Barao's left wrist with his right hand.

    2. Barao throws a straight right that Dillashaw easily avoids.

    3. Again Dillashaw controls Barao's lead hand with his own.

    4. Now Dillashaw attacks with his own rear hand. Barao tries to anticipate with a slip, but Dillashaw's punch is not to thehead, but rather a hard uppercut to the body.

    5. Dillashaw cuts back into orthodox to culb Barao with a rabbit punch.

    Here, Dillashaw uses handfighting tactics to thwart Barao's fearsome punching. Controlling Barao's left wrist, he literally siezes the initiative: Barao cannot throw that left without first jerking his hand free, which would give Dillashaw plenty of time to react. Thus, the champion is realistically left with only his right hand able to strike, allowing Dillashaw to focus on only defending attacks from that side.

    The disadvantage to this tactic is that Dillashaw is also left with just one free hand. He is not, however, restricted to one kind of attack, or one target. This is where Dillashaw gets clever. After dodging Barao's right, he once again begins controlling the Brazilian's lead, and then launches his own rear hand. Barao reacts much as Dillashaw did to his own cross, slipping to his right, only this punch isn't a cross. Instead Dillashaw opts to throw a difficult-to-defend uppercut to the solar plexus, stepping off to the right as he does so, and then using his angle to hit Barao with his right as he scurries out of range.

    That final punch, while not strictly legal or very effective, does indicate the philosophy that makes Dillashaw so dangerous, which we see more of in the next round.

    Continues on Bloody Elbow...
     
  2. Kafir-kun

    Kafir-kun Autocratic Centrist

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    Really good piece, I read both today and I enjoyed it very much. Dillashaw's superior footwork and mastery of range was apparent even to an untrained eye like mine. I did find this line at the end odd
    Barao is a killer himself and more of a proven finisher than Dillashaw. Its just hard to get fans interested in the lighter weight classes period.
     
  3. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    I found it weird that the MMA lighter divisions often got spat on by a lot of fans, but if we look over to boxing the lighter divisions are the money makers. I suppose it is just growing pains though.
     
  4. Kafir-kun

    Kafir-kun Autocratic Centrist

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    Maybe so. I started following the lighter weight classes about a year after I started following MMA in general and I thought it was pretty easy to get into. At the time Aldo had just got the WEC belt so one of the first diet class fights I saw was Aldo vs Brown and I loved it and couldn't wait to see more. Even flyweight, a weight classes I didn't care for initially, grew on me pretty quickly.
     
  5. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    I hopes it will be the same for Women division to grow like the lighter division. It is not everyday where a sport can share the main spotlight for the female competitors.

    To get back to the articles, is it me or Dillashaw utilized a lot of good pivots in this fight? I remember one instance where he pivoted almost all the way to Barao's back, and proceed to clip him a few times?
     
  6. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

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    "I'm typically not a fan of stance-switching, but that's because it's almost always done poorly, particularly in MMA, where countless fighters find themselves enamoured with the idea of switching leads before they've even gotten good at their natural stance. "



    I was really hooked lately after TJ's fight on this concept. (Actually, not initiating in southpaw, but switching to get an angle or to cover distance while switching) How can you tell what makes a good switch or what shoud I be watching while doing it? Because it seems to work pretty good with me.
     
  7. Kafir-kun

    Kafir-kun Autocratic Centrist

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    I think I remember that. I believe TJ was getting presured against the fence and then he turned it around on Barao.
     
  8. DivineComedy

    DivineComedy Green Belt

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    Stance-switching is all about opportunity of attacks and defense. And how does it do that? Angles. Creating angles and at the same time taking away their own.
     
  9. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    Might i add the question is basically boil down "do you know all the angles in both stances and use it effectively?". Considering mastering all the angles in one stance is already hard enough, doing it for both stance is a lot of works.
     
  10. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

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    I don't really need to know all the angles from southpaw. Just a few from combinations that I'm going to use, right?
     
  11. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    That's just the quick and dirty way of going at it. You might have some success, but once somebody catch on you'd be fuck.
     
  12. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    Ray Sefo crushing Jerome LeBanner comes to mind as an opportune stance switch.

    I've not met many real life people that can move as well in either stance, usually somebody has a strong side. People that switch stance without proper reasoning and just sit there are usually easy meat. People I've seen tend to switch stance and have a couple of go to combos but get plodding footwork. Tj's seamed to he switch then left hand lead or left kick lead, he was however doing enough to mix things up.

    Wrestler have an advantage with this as they usually have their power leg forward, then learn striking with their power leg to the rear. Matt Hughes was an example of somebody that could ONLY wrestle power leg forward and ONLY strike power leg back.
     
  13. flanellograf

    flanellograf Silver Belt

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    Thing is, listening to Connors podcast with Duane, Duane apparently has stance switching as a fundamental part of his system where every possible scenario from the stances is included and taught.
     
  14. aries

    aries Silver Belt

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    Is part one available? Anywhere but bloodyelbow as the internet filter at work flags it for violence :icon_sad:
     
  15. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    Yeah, that seems to be the case. It's a very TMA way of approaching it, and I don't doubt that it's probably Bas Rutten's influence in him.

    To his credit, it definitely paid off with Dillashaw. He didn't pivot so much as step, cut back, and start fighting out of the opposite stance. It allowed him to take angles and immediately use them, and it made it really difficult for Barao to pin down just how far away Dillashaw was going to be at any given moment.

    This GIF right here is a great example of what I'm talking about:

    [​IMG]

    No pivoting there, but a step and a shift that accomplishes the same thing.
     
  16. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    I'm afraid not... Sorry man. I'd post the entirety of part one here if I could, but I can only do snippets on sites other than BE.

    Since when is violence not allowed at work?
     
  17. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    His head movement in that gif is precise. Just enough dip, slip to make Barao miss.
     
  18. flanellograf

    flanellograf Silver Belt

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    His system got vindicated, that's for sure. I knew TJ had a good chance, but that fight was a complete shut out. And it's exciting, as mma seems to be very faddish, so now a lot of fighters and trainers are going to start to realize the importance or angles, for instance.
     
  19. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    I fucking hope not.
    It's not a style that comes over night, and without proper tuition it's going to end up with guys just dancing round with their hands down leaping into punches.

    It's like that fucking "Anderson Silva Matrix" thing. Guys were thinking they could plant their feet, wave their head around randomly and wouldn't get hit.
     
  20. flanellograf

    flanellograf Silver Belt

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    Well, I was more talking about lifting the veil. It's already been happening, but more proof just fuels innovation and encourages fighters and coaches to evolve. It's not like footwork, range and angles is a new thing either.
    And some growing pains are to be expected.
     

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