Strength vs Power routine?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by omgitsrick, May 23, 2008.

  1. omgitsrick

    omgitsrick Green Belt

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    What are the differences? Do you use the same exercises but perform them differently? Is power more explosive movements whereas strength is highest weight possible? Does anyone have an example power routine? I'm just curious what is the difference, because the FAQ had nothing on it.
     
  2. Klotz

    Klotz Shalom

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    Power generally implies olympic lifting. Also more plyometric stuff like box jumps. Power is both strength and speed, whereas strength is just strength.
     
  3. omgitsrick

    omgitsrick Green Belt

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    Like exclusively olympic lifting? Or do you mix it up with variations of other exercises and such.
     
  4. Klotz

    Klotz Shalom

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    There's no set way to do anything. People working on power should definitely have a focus on Oly lifts though.
     
  5. Donut62

    Donut62 Black Belt

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    Power is work performed per unit of time. Work is equal to force applied over a distance. So any lift can be performed in such a manner to maximize power. The classic example being Westside performing bench or squat with approximately 60% of a 1RM, focusing on moving the weight with maximal speed. Any "explosive" lift is powerful, it doesn't have to be an olympic lift. Jumping onto a box or clapping push-ups are more examples.
     
  6. omgitsrick

    omgitsrick Green Belt

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    How many reps on those submaximal lifts?
     
  7. Donut62

    Donut62 Black Belt

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    Very few. Similar reps to what you would perform with near max weight, but more sets. So generally 1-5. Speed bench is usually done 8 sets of 3 reps, squat 12 sets of 2 reps. The total volume of 24 is taken from Preliphin's chart.
     
  8. arctic82

    arctic82 Orange Belt

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    As a general rule for speed and power developement for non-competative lifter the prosentage can vary from 40-70% of 1RM. more experienced lifters generally gear towards the lower end (40-60% 1RM) whilst less experienced lifters benefit from higher prosentages.

    Also if you are not training for a competition max single you should not worry about the reps as much as the bar speed and explosivenes of the lift, the point being that the set should be terminated before you slow down be it 2 or 6 reps. The higher end of reps (10-20) with lighter load also has more effect on speed developement than pure power.
     
  9. takeahnase

    takeahnase watching the swarm

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    Just a comment: Performing bench or squat with approximately 60% of a 1RM, focusing on moving the weight with maximal speed maximizes power given that you are benching or squatting. It doesn't maximize power over the set of available exercises. BTW this is something that comes across garbled in Simmons' writings: You can hit yourself in the head explosively, but it won't do much for your athletic performance. From what I know, jerks have the highest power output out of the big 3 and olympic variants, followed by cleans. (Also, the 40-70% scale just barely applies to olympic lifts, where power output is maximized at relatively high percentages (70%+).)

    However, depending on your previous training and natural abilities, training for "power" may not mean that you need to perform movements that maximize power (read olympic lifts or speed big 3). Maximizing absolute strength (with low velocity, high force movements - e.g. heavy squatting) will shift the force-velocity curve upward and may allow you to generate more power at a certain exercises. Similarly, increasing your speed (with high velocity, low force movements - e.g. box jumps) can also shift the force-velocity curve upward.
     
  10. Donut62

    Donut62 Black Belt

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    Tak's post is right on, especially if you aren't all that strong, simply increasing absolute strength will be the fastest most efficient way to increase explosiveness.
     
  11. takeahnase

    takeahnase watching the swarm

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    Hmm...maybe I should quit oly :eek:
     
  12. ratman201

    ratman201 S&P's resident Chef

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    Never! No matter how many times CS calls us ghey for doing them.
     
  13. takeahnase

    takeahnase watching the swarm

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    Skinny bitches UNITE!
     
  14. ratman201

    ratman201 S&P's resident Chef

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    Speaking of which. I fdidn't get a stimulus checkk, becasue my projected tax burden for 2009 was $0. I live below the standard deduction. So, it will be about a month before I can buy any weights.

    I want to set up a strength-centric O-lift routine. Have very little time each day, maybe 45 minutes between work and school, though I could fit in 30 minutes before work. I'm perplexed how to go about doing this. I'm thinking less work per session, but spead out over 11 possible 30 minute sessions, that includes all warmup, prehab and stretching, etc.
     
  15. Donut62

    Donut62 Black Belt

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    You know deep down inside that cold nazi heart, there is a powerlifter waiting to come out.
     
  16. SixTwoSix

    SixTwoSix Guest

    I'd say power is more explosive actions, while strength could just be raw strength. Hard to explain.
     
  17. takeahnase

    takeahnase watching the swarm

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    Is this a question or just a statement? Are we looking at 11 sessions per week? If yes, I would do something like this:

    1: Bar warm-up + Snatch triples light + stretch
    2. Lower body mobility + Back Squat Triples medium
    3. Bar warm-up + Clean triples light+ stretch
    4. Upper body mobility + Jerk Doubles medium + Abs
    5. Lower body mobility + Front Squat Doubles medium
    6. Bar warm-up + Snatch triples medium + stretch OR Hamstring work + stretch
    7. Upper body mobility + Clean & Jerk doubles medium OR Shoulder work + stretch
    8. Lower body mobility + Front Squat Doubles medium + Abs or lower back
    9. Bar warm-up + Snatch Work up to a max + stretch
    10. Bar warm-up + Clean & Jerk Work up to a max
    11. Bar warm-up + Front Squat Work up to a max

    light = ~ 70%
    medium = ~ 80-85%
     
  18. arctic82

    arctic82 Orange Belt

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    Agreed. Improving max strenght brings alot of goos things. It also improves endurance...
     
  19. daemonarch

    daemonarch blow for blow

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    No!

    You can very well be explosive without having any real power worth speaking of. (almost every flyweight boxer are explosive but they have no power when compared to heavyer guys)

    But, in order to be powerfull you must be strong first - strenght is single most important factor when comes to power excercising.
    The other one is velocity, the ability to execute as much of a strenght in shorthest time possible, and for that you need some good "transmision" of power - a proper techinque.

    Sot thats the way to go.
    Thats the way of nature - strenght is alpha and omega when it comes to power and it will not help however much claping-pushups or plyometry jumps you performe yo will acomplish nothing.

    The only way to go is to work on your brute strenght first and than incorporate some good excercises for improving technique required for better "transmision" of your strenght into desired effect.
     
  20. ghostwipe

    ghostwipe Black Belt

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    Unless you're well into your training (more than at least a year of real training, but probably more like several years for most people), you'd be better off just focusing on basic lifts, done heavy and explosive.
     

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