Lightweights - Training for explosiveness.

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by TJB, Mar 9, 2008.

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  1. TJB

    TJB White Belt

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    A lot of maximal strength training for strength and size will slow you down as a fighter.

    No, this is not a myth. The lighter you are the faster and more explosive you can be. It's common sense; the idea is to have maximum strength with minimum bulk to be a more efficient fighter.

    Here are some real life examples:

    Here is a video of lightweight boxing champion Amir Khan

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSblALBeJrw

    Here is taekwondo K-1 fighter Serkan Yilmaz

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBdtzh8y7sc

    These guys are incredibly explosive. They can fight that explosively, because they have kept their weight to around 60KG. Being this light means training differently than low/ slow bench press reps.

    On this forum, and around the Internet I read of hundreds of strength training routines, which will improve you as an all round fighter. Training for minumum bulk and lightness is very scarse.

    Does anyone know how do the guys above, and others who stay under 65KG will train!?

    I have the impression they use 60/70% 1RM, and lift explosively as possible, never to failure. Does anyone know any more?
     
  2. bad_coupon

    bad_coupon Orange Belt

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  3. TrinitronMaximu

    TrinitronMaximu Orange Belt

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    I'm not an expert, but I'll throw in my two cents.

    Power comes from strength and speed, so to increase your maximal power output, eventually you need to increase your maximum strength.

    If you never train close to your 1RM, it will be hard to increase your 1RM (max strength). I've heard that low rep high intensity weight training combined with plyos is the best way to increase overall power.
     
  4. tri4ben

    tri4ben Orange Belt

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  5. hunto

    hunto Brown Belt

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    Bullgoddamfuckingshit.
     
  6. hunto

    hunto Brown Belt

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    Go to your bench press, load it with 300 lbs, and drop it on your neck.
     
  7. Andy Rickert

    Andy Rickert Amateur Fighter

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    you are beating a dead horse. Not a dead horse that was right either, you're beating the retarded dead horse that drank water until it died
     
  8. Snives823

    Snives823 Green Belt

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    wow and i thought that warren sapp was lighter on his feet than urijah faber. are you stupid or is this just a bad day for you. muscle causes explosiveness and huge people are slower because they are huge. but muscular people explode.
     
  9. JPC

    JPC Purple Belt

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    Size has more to do with how much people eat. Explosiveness comes from training for strength and power with heavy AND light weights.
     
  10. w0cyru01

    w0cyru01 Purple Belt

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    60-70% of your 1RM with the fork maybe
     
  11. Standard

    Standard Too dumb to learn, too stubborn to quit

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    Thanks, this was a nice mix of common sense and pure dog shit. Next time you want to come and inform us about myths how about you do some god damn research first.
     
  12. WildCard

    WildCard Blue Belt

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    wtf did I just read?
     
  13. mpg9999

    mpg9999 Yellow Belt

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    http://www.rosstraining.com/articles/strengthtraining.html

    "After reading that excess max-strength can impair speed strength, you may initially assume that heavy weight lifting is harmful for fighters. This is not true however.

    Many old school trainers believe heavy weights will lead to excess bulk and reduced speed. This is a myth. Although excessive development of max-strength can pose problems, this strength quality is still important (if trained in moderation).

    To understand the relevance of maximal strength training, it is important to first understand how the body functions. Once you understand the body, there is no disputing the relevance of maximal strength training.

    For starters, muscle fibers are grouped into motor units. A motor unit contains hundreds of muscle fibers and one nerve, which delivers a signal to the muscle fibers. All of the muscle fibers contained within the motor unit are of the same type (fast twitch or slow twitch). When a signal is passed for the motor unit to contract, all of the fibers within that motor unit will contract.

    When training for power development, we must target the fast twitch muscle fibers. Unfortunately, not all motor units are activated at once. Low intensity exercise does not activate the fast twitch muscle fibers. If the exercise does not stimulate a fast twitch motor unit, the muscle fibers contained within the unit will not adapt to the training. Essentially, if the motor unit is not recruited, no response occurs.

    Thus, if you only lift very light loads, you will not adequately target the fast twitch muscle fibers. When lifting heavy loads (training maximal strength), a high percentage of motor units are activated. During such intense loads, fast twitch motor units are recruited. For this reason, maximal strength training is considered the superior method for improving both intramuscular and intermuscular coordination.

    So, while excessive max-strength training can lead to problems, this strength quality must not be ignored. Through proper program design, max-strength training can be used to enhance the power potential of any athlete (ie. improve your ability to recruit, hence utilize your fast twitch muscle fibers). "
     
  14. joshetc

    joshetc butthole hurts from teh gay

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    Here's the real problem, its next to impossible to accidentally put on the amount of bulk required to actually slow you down. Even if you are 5'8 and 190lbs you can be pretty damn fast and explosive.

    Not to mention, back, leg, and core strength really can't realistically slow you down, period. Massive powerful legs sure as hell wont slow your punch down, and Cro Cop, as well as just about every NFL running back have as explosive legs as I've ever seen.
     
  15. DEVILsSON

    DEVILsSON Black Belt

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    TJB....instead of spouting horseshit why dont you actually research something....i bet you have no formal education in exercise, kinesiology, or anything related....and probably dont have much experience beyond some calisthenics or curl monkey bs.....am i close?
     
  16. TheDavid

    TheDavid Banned Banned

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    I didn't know that!

    Anyways, running is all you need to strengthen your legs. Look at the FIFA guys. There beasts!
     
  17. TJB

    TJB White Belt

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    I did post 2 videos of explosive athletes as I predicted that suggesting big muscles are unneccessary would be unpopular here.

    It is very simple: a 60KG athlete will be much faster and agile than an 80KG athlete. This is attested by countless martial artists over the years.

    If anyone doesn't feel threatened by that, could they please share any knowledge they have about explosive training.


    For rate of force development, max strength and speed strength must both be targeted.

    This is true, hypertrophy is not an indication of strength. It is possible to be very strong without having huge muscles and this is what any fighter would want.

    I am interested in how lightweights such as Amir Khan train. There is limited information about it on the Internet.

    Here is a link to the sort of training done for explosive martial artists.

    http://www.martialarts-101.com/martial_arts_squatting_speed.asp

    Information is somewhat limited however. Does anyone know what sort of training light atheletes (60-65KG) such as Amir Khan would do?
     
  18. BlondeWarrior

    BlondeWarrior Green Belt

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    White belt hall of fame inductee.
     
  19. ChaseT.

    ChaseT. Banned Banned

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    Why did you wait a whole seven months to start trolling?
     
  20. Ian Coe

    Ian Coe Silver Belt Professional Fighter

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    Ok then

    What kind of shitty matt furey esk bok are you trying to sell


    Oh yeah, how many taekwondo K-1 fighters have you known to win k-1 (and I mean PURE taekwondo guys who haven't migrated to something else. I don't know the history of that k-1 fighter so can't comment)


    same ip address?
     
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