Is training in 6200 foot elevation high?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Too $hort, Apr 9, 2008.

  1. Too $hort

    Too $hort Guest

    just wondering becasue thats the elavation were I live(colorado),also I was wondering if gas masks would help aid my cardio work
     
  2. EnjoyKane

    EnjoyKane Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,329
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Loss An-je-les, ka-lih-FOR-nyuh
    That is over a mile above sea level...it will deff benefit you. You could always just use a snorkel and nose plug, gas masks can't be cheap....
     
  3. son_goku

    son_goku Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mankato, Minnesota
    I would consider anything above a mile [5280 feet] high.
     
  4. Krossinc

    Krossinc Design is el cool

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Richmond, Va
    Well granted you live in Colorado, so it's not something you're doing by choice, but I get so tired of fighters running to elevation for training when there's little proof that training at a higher elevation actually improves your conditioning at a lower elevation.
     
  5. physicaltherapy

    physicaltherapy Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    0
    Really?
     
  6. mschatz

    mschatz Hamma: I has it

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    12,163
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I lived at about 5500 feet from 4 years old to about 16. When I moved down to sea level, the first time I ran the mile for time, I dropped 40 seconds from my previous best. It def makes a difference in my opinion.
     
  7. Tre5sev

    Tre5sev Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    797
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Eastsida Phoenix
    Source?
     
  8. Krossinc

    Krossinc Design is el cool

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Richmond, Va
    I am no expert on it myself, but I do know there's incredible psychological and physiological stresses put on the body at high altitude and the benefits of the alt. training is probably not great enough to overcome it. A common misconception most people have is they believe there is less oxygen at elevation when it's the pressure that makes the difference, not the oxygen levels.
     
  9. mschatz

    mschatz Hamma: I has it

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    12,163
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    San Francisco
    So...youre saying that there isnt less oxygen at 6000 feet than sea level? Or youre just saying that that doesnt have any effect?

    Physiological stress at 5000-6500 feet doesnt seem very likely. Maybe if your training at 10,000 feet or more.
     
  10. Krossinc

    Krossinc Design is el cool

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Richmond, Va
    It's a bit complicated. The same level of oxygen is here as it is on the top of Mt. Everest, however due to the pressure less oxygen is actually transported to the muscles. Of course the higher you guy, the less pressure, which essentially results in your hemoglobin transporting less oxygen.

    I've seen some sources that say Altitude training is wonderful and some that say it's not important. At the moment, I currently believe it has little to no effect and is more of a detriment to a fighter.
     
  11. Too $hort

    Too $hort Guest

    I dont know about my elevation but in extreme conditions like in kena africa were its 10,000 plus IT DOES GIVE YOU AN EDGE thats why they limit 3 kenyan's to one race becasue they would come in 1,2,3,4,5 really thats were they get a huge edge.I would die trying to run a 5 min mile in kenya
     
  12. Standard

    Standard Too dumb to learn, too stubborn to quit

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    8,834
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Canada
    I would wonder how big of a factor the conditions are compared to the fact that they have a lifestyle that clearly accepts and incorporates running into their everyday lives. Same reason there are so many Pro Canadian hockey players, the fact we have a fairly long winter doesn't really mean anything compared to the fact most every kid is tossed onto an ice rink with a stick before they hit grade school.
     
  13. IrishBeatDown****

    IrishBeatDown**** Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Messages:
    690
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hampton Roads
    i think elevation training helps ALOT.... i spent 22 days backpacking in newmexico and colorado between 7-13k ft... now it may have been the fact that i was working HARD almost constantly... or the fact that i lost 13lbs... but i found that when i went back home i had sooooo much more energy in my workouts... i was however signifigantly weaker. but that was not due to th elevation training, that was due to muscle and fat loss from the extreme calorie deficit.
     
  14. Polynikes

    Polynikes Not Impressed

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2003
    Messages:
    11,528
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Southeast GA
    I have an altitude tent, and I have an altitude mask you can wear while using a treadmill or an indoor trainer or whatever.

    Training at altitude does positively affect your cardio at sea level, and sleeping at altitude and training at sea level even more so than that.

    I am actually planning a pretty gruesome ride on my indoor trainer at 12,500 feet tomorrow.
     
  15. YeahBee

    YeahBee Samdog Original Nine

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    24,942
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Land of the Ice and Snow
    that was a myth, atleast to a documentary I saw a coupel of years ago, a DAnish study between danish youths and kenyan youths showed that even with the same amount of training and so on the Kenyans ran faster, and plenty of those Kenyans didn't travel/move as much as some of the danish kids outside of training. their bodies were jsut better equipped for long distance running, especially something to do with their lower legs/calfs.

    jsut like you don't see many Japanese 100 m sprinters
     
  16. Krossinc

    Krossinc Design is el cool

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Richmond, Va
    The term genetics seems to have a place here.
     
  17. mschatz

    mschatz Hamma: I has it

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    12,163
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I'd be really surprised if elevation didnt play a role. As others have mentioned, I have definitely noticed the results in my own experiences.
     
  18. ThePitBull32

    ThePitBull32 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2006
    Messages:
    1,302
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    North of Detroit, Way South of Heaven
    I am a believer in high altitude training...I lived above 6000 ft, and I noticed a difference. It took awhile to acclimate to the elevation, but after I felt that I was back "in shape". When I moved back to sea level, I felt lighter and faster.
     
  19. physicaltherapy

    physicaltherapy Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    0
    You have a Michael Jackson Tent!!!! Isn't that expensive? Are you a pro athlete?
     
  20. physicaltherapy

    physicaltherapy Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    0
    I hate citing wiki but here's the wiki article. They do cite scientific studies.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_altitude_training
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.