Fighters Who Were Thrown To The Wolves Too Soon Thread

sushijin

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Name fighters who were thrown into a big fight too soon.

1. Pete Rademacher- How do you beat this one? Highly decorated amateur fighter Rademacher thrown in with Floyd Patterson in his very 1st fight for the HW championship! He did manage to put Patterson on the canvas before succumbing himself.

2. Marvis Frazier-Came into fight with Larry Holmes at 11-0. He wasn't ready though. He was mercifully beaten by Larry in the opening stanza, and it was actually Holmes that waived the referee in to stop the onslaught.
 
Well, migessy is trying to throw Andre Berto to the wolves too soon.
 
Fernando Vargas.

Leon Spinks.

Holyfield was thrown in fast too, but he succeeded nonetheless.


EDIT: Happens in MMA a lot of the time, happened in Pride shows regularly.
A guy's first fight, and it's against a top professional.
The Japanese didn't place as much emphasis on winning; if the man thrown to the wolves acquitted himself well in a losing effort, they'd bring him back again. It's a "Sink-or-Swim" mentality, find out quick if the man had a fighting heart.
 
I think Yuriorkas Gamboa will be moved too fast.

And yes, Fernando Vargas.
 
I thought of Marvis as soon as I read the thread title.

Facing off with Holmes before the fight, I was thinking papa Joe might say "go sit down son, I'll deal with this".
 
I thought of Marvis as soon as I read the thread title.

Facing off with Holmes before the fight, I was thinking papa Joe might say "go sit down son, I'll deal with this".

If you remember the staredown before the fight, I think Joe was staring at Larry like HE was the one getting it on with him... Or was that the Tyson fight? Ah hell, he probably did that in both fights... LOL. Didn't help his son much in either contest, did it?
 
Panchito Bojado
yah but I think bojado didint have the pysical tools,he had some pop but not really.I thought he was a decent prospect and then got thrown in with a small jesse james and got beat pretty handidly
 
Ok, this selection might seem a lil strange, but i'll explain...

My boy John Mugabi.... Now why.... He was 26-0 when he fought Hagler, but he had very little experience in fighting a boxer puncher type. His victims up to the fight with Hagler were mostly punchers with very little else going for them. Then to be thrown in a fight with Hagler, who not only possessed a skill set he had not yet seen, but also had the greatest chin of all time? And was a converted southpaw on top of that??? I hated that fight the moment it was signed. I was hoping Mugabi would get a crack at either Duran, Hearns, or somebody else for a title at 154 first. But they signed the Hagler fight and he lost in a valiant effort. He actually did better than I thought he would.
 
Life or death fight with Mugabbi. He just sat his ass down when he knew he couldn't take Marvin out.
 
Mugabi said that the one champion of the division he didn't want was Hagler. Thats who he got.
 
Mugabi said that the one champion of the division he didn't want was Hagler. Thats who he got.
 
The Hagler fight ruined Mugabi.

No doubt about it. I blame Mickey Duff, his brain trust, for this.... I think Mugabi had a bit of Gerry Coonyitis... In other words, his first loss destroyed his own self image that he was indestructible. He knew he was mortal at this point. Afterwards he went into a self loathing phase, got fat and out of shape, and pretty much didn't give a fuck anymore. Then his next fight against Duane Thomas didn't help at all... Ended freakishly, but a loss is a loss... It sent him further into the doldrums. He finally got it right vs Jacquet, but he was already a shell of himself by that point, IMO. He had a fast expiration date with his style of punching. Strangely, he is one of the greatest punchers to actually lose his punching power towards the end. I have his career set on DVD, and he was very unremarkable in his last several fights. You couldn't even really tell it was the same fighter as pre-Hagler....
 
No doubt about it. I blame Mickey Duff, his brain trust, for this.... I think Mugabi had a bit of Gerry Coonyitis... In other words, his first loss destroyed his own self image that he was indestructible. He knew he was mortal at this point. Afterwards he went into a self loathing phase, got fat and out of shape, and pretty much didn't give a fuck anymore. Then his next fight against Duane Thomas didn't help at all... Ended freakishly, but a loss is a loss... It sent him further into the doldrums. He finally got it right vs Jacquet, but he was already a shell of himself by that point, IMO. He had a fast expiration date with his style of punching. Strangely, he is one of the greatest punchers to actually lose his punching power towards the end. I have his career set on DVD, and he was very unremarkable in his last several fights. You couldn't even really tell it was the same fighter as pre-Hagler....

I remember a bit of his "second career".

I don't know if he actually lost his power, but I do think he was trying to imitate the second career of Nigel Benn (after Benn abandoned his reckless attack), but he was probably too burned out at that point.
 
I remember a bit of his "second career".

I don't know if he actually lost his power, but I do think he was trying to imitate the second career of Nigel Benn (after Benn abandoned his reckless attack), but he was probably too burned out at that point.

He lost it, bruh. Look at his body early in his career and then later on. He wasn't nearly as well muscled or powerful. And make no mistake about it, he was one of those fighters where his physical strength played a significant part in his power. Same thing with Foreman, who I have always stated that Mugabi was a miniature version of... Imagine Foreman not being as strong physically when he came back. He would have been screwed. He just came back flabbier and slower, but he was as strong as a bull. Mugabi lost that physical edge somehow. He wasn't the same specimen.
 
we've done this one before, I'll say it again, David Reid.
 
David Reid is a good choice. He's what happens when you try to rush a gold medalist too soon.
 
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