Boxing: Infighting

SideofKO

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Okay, it seems that my first thread was lost in the virtual world someplace. No matter. I'd like this thread to cover the fundamentals of infighting for boxing, fighting in the pocket, how to bridge the gap using slipping, etc. I'm really beginning to like this style of boxing and I would like some more experienced guys to help this thread become a resource.

Thanks in advance guys.
 
Usually to get into the inside, I throw a jab (maybe a right), slip, and step in. then I start to hammer where I see the openings.

Sometimes I will just set up combos like jab jab right, step in, left uppercut or something. Keeping the pressure on.
 
The basics of it are simple enough.
To get inside, you have to work your footwork and particularly cutting your opponent off. A good jab helps a lot. Jabs are not only useful for setting up punches but also for letting you dictate the position. Work on being able to punch and defend while moving.

Once inside, work a lot on your uppercuts, hooks and body shots. Straight punches are less effective up close. Know how to mix up these different punches and change angles. Throw a combination then move to the side so that you're not in front of the opponent to get hit and to make him more open for punches. I also bend my knees to secure my center of gravity so it'll be harder for him to push me off and easier for me to push him around.

BTW, fighting in the pocket is different from infighting.
 
Double jab always helped me get inside. I'd throw a long then a short jab stepping in after the long jab. The short jab was just to keep leather in his face.

Once inside I liked to hook to the body then to the head on the same side. I also throw a lot of straight shots just shortened up dramaticly. Really I never even straightened my arm just rolled my wrist horizontal and threw with a lot of hip action.

I also liked the upper-cut inside. I throew the upper-cut then rolled and hooked with the same hand. It seemed to work since the counter for the upper-cut was a hook my hook landed alot.

If you plan on fighting inside dont forget your shoulder bumps and elbow pushes. You can scowl at these all you want but until you learn them you are not infighting.

Once inside stay busy. Punches in bunches and throw every time your oppnent tries to step away. Dont forget punch in and punch out.
 
just watch some ray mancini fights

Better yet watch the fight where Livingstone Bramble beat his ass all over the ring on the inside.

Then watch the second fight when he did it again.
 
Better yet watch the fight where Livingstone Bramble beat his ass all over the ring on the inside.

Then watch the second fight when he did it again.

Can these classic fights be found online easily? I guess my real questions is,Where is a good sight to watch classic boxing?
 
They should be. It's a pretty popular Fight in which Bramble won the Lightweight Title for the first time. Beat Mancini at his own game, and quite handily.
 
Im pretty short for my weight, so when I fight, most people tend to try to keep me at the end of their punches, with amatuer style combinations.

Heres what I do to get inside.

1.) FIGHT TALL! Yes you need to get inside, but fight standing up all the way, with good posture, because your opponent punches where you are at, not where you are about to be, so when you fight tall, and you decide to go on the inside, their is suddenly a dramatic difference in levels. Most guys who try to fight on the inside stay hunched over, and they make it harder on themselves.

2.) DONT WALK FORWARD! Instead, take ONE giant leap, and lean your body to either side as you lower yourself.

3.) BE PHYSICAL! Once on the inside, unleash, to the body double up your hooks, body head, push hold smother. If you corner your opponent, likely they will flurry with the intention to back you off, instead of stepping back, again, lower yourself, step to oneside and unleash to the body again, most of the time, they are coming forward at this time to get out of the corner, and they walk into the body shot.

4.) When you are on the inside, and not punching, your elbows should be in tight, and knees bent, so if your opponent throws a left hook to the body, you lower yourself, check it with the right elbow thats tucked into your side, and fire a right uppercut. And vica verca.

And finally, if you are on the inside, and plan to make it a short visit, ALWAYS end your combination with a stiff jab as you back away so they are stopped in their tracks momentarily.

Thats all I can think of.
 
2.) DONT WALK FORWARD! Instead, take ONE giant leap, and lean your body to either side as you lower yoursel

Esh, kinda risky. A counter-puncher's dream approach that is. I'd say come in behind double and triple-jabs, perhaps slipping as well before leaping.
 
Esh, kinda risky. A counter-puncher's dream approach that is. I'd say come in behind double and triple-jabs, perhaps slipping as well before leaping.

Yea, take one giant leap, leaning to either side, which is the slipping part.

Personally, Ive never seen the light with the whole double jabbing and triple jabbing my way to the inside, if anything Ive always thought that after the first time you do it, you are letting your opponent know you are about to try to come on the inside.

I prefer to let them throw first, then take that leap to the inside.
 
Unless you have crazy speed, that's FAR more risky than jabbing your way in, which shouldn't require seeing the light, it's been done for years. And if your opponent already doesn't know you're going to try and come inside because you're waiting to take a giant leap to either side, then that's just plain not a smart opponent.
 
I like the way King Kabuki is doing it.
I like atleast 2 long punches of my own before I step in. weather its 2 jabs, or double jab right hand, or just a 1,2 step in I use my long arms to set up inside work
 
I like the way King Kabuki is doing it.
I like atleast 2 long punches of my own before I step in. weather its 2 jabs, or double jab right hand, or just a 1,2 step in I use my long arms to set up inside work

I'm actually NOT doing it. lol I'm a counter-puncher, so I'd much rather be at-range. If I can keep you on the end of my reach, that spells trouble. I'm citing what works best against me. I get put in with a lot of pressure fighters, the ones who come in behind double and triple jabs are the hardest to contend with. The ones who leap, if I time them, bad news.
 
Not really, Mancini was definitely known for strength and workrate, just Bramble beat him on skill, stamina, and a good chin. It was a brilliant fight, and it demonstrates the very good Pros and Cons of in-fighting.
 
if one is afraid of somebody knowing your throwing a double and triple jab everytime then mix up your jabs with feints or use jab-step R or L and double/triple jab from there. you can create an angle that way and if he tries to line back up, get inside from there.

if you can get the taller guy to freeze for a second with a feint you can make up a considerable amount of the distance.
 
I am as
well Kabuki. I use my long arms (I have LONG arms for my weight, yet I don't seem lankey, its wierd) so I throw my punches wait for them to respond, side step and counter. Kinda like a lure tactic. I love this style, it works best for me, but every now and then I mix it up for certain opponents that it doesnt seem to work on.
 
Jus to clarify, I usually wait to side step onto the inside, once my opponent initiates. So as he is throwing a 1,2,3 im lowering myself, taking a big step forward and choosing a side to fire on.

Everyone tells me to jab my way in though, perhaps im just stuborn
 
Here's the thing Bro, you can still do the footwork you're talking about behind the double-jab. There's no reason NOT to. You can do it behind a low-jab, high-jab combination as well. It gives you a shield coming in, and occupies the other Fighter's hands.
 

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