best forearm workout?...

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by AxeGrinder, Jul 17, 2005.

  1. AxeGrinder

    AxeGrinder Purple Belt

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    although my forearms are very strong as it is, I'd like to build upon that and make them even stronger...what is the best method for building and strengthening my forearms?...

    thanks in advance....
     
  2. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    I'm probably going to close this thread as there is a NUMBER of resources on grip work already available... but first I'll do my best to contribute. Since you stated NO goals whatsoever I'll cover what I think are the best, most broad methods for developing forearm strength. In no particular order:

    Thickbar work. If I had my way every gym would be equiped with a range of barbells and dumbells varying from 1" to 3" thick in 1/4" intervals. Everyone would then evaluate each exercise thusly, "Can I hold onto the bar easily while I perform this movement?" if the answer is yes, you need a thicker bar. This goes for deadlifts, bent over rows, pullups, and especially isolation exercises. I also contend that all olympic lifts for non oly lifters should be done with a thickbar.

    Rope climbing. Get a thick rope (mine is 1.5" manila, but if you can find 2" or greater) and string it up on a tree branch or something. now climb that mother fucker! Good for finger strength, wrist strength, thickbar sustaining strength and it hits your upper body to boot.

    Thick handled KB's. I made my own (pictured below) for about 50 bucks (not includning plates). Now do swing and catches with it: perform a swing but change hands by tossing it in the air and catching it with the other hand. Carefull, I strained my back with this one so work on form before you go super heavy.
    [​IMG]

    Block weights. Brookfield (owner of some of the strongest mits the world has ever seen) says blockweights = hand strength. His word is good enough for me. you can do indivual finger lifts with them, blockweight tosses from hand to hand (keeping an overhand grip), snatches, cleans and presses, etc. Blockweights are a great tool for hand strength. Don't know what a block weight is? check the glossary.

    Levering = wrist strength. Grab a sledge and lever that son of a bitch. I would argue that this kind of wrist strength (front levering and overhead levering, as well as rotational) is the most important lower arm strength to develop for fighters. If you can get a solid grip on your opponent you help move your opponent with the strength you'll develop with levering. and it will make your punches much more solid.

    You'll note I didn't mention grippers on here? that's cause grippers are good for getting better at grippers. that's about it. If you want to get better strength for cutting nails or wire or clamping down pliers or something, fine, grippers are good. But if you want good grip training for any other athletic endevor, you may want to consider hiding your grippers and focusing on other things.

    Lastly, learn to bend shit. It's great for parties and bending nails is the greatest expression of lower arm strength in existence.
     
  3. AxeGrinder

    AxeGrinder Purple Belt

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    alright, thanks for the input, (sorry for not giving you much to go on), Im talking about just good functional grip strength here, like when I wrestle somebody, I've often had an advantage due to the fact that I can grab an arm or leg and simply not let em' go and just maneuvering them at will...I want to build upon that, just getting at strong as I can fore-arm wise...I already do rope climbing occasionally, its worked well too, I might try your little home-made devise you made, or something close to it, any ideas on something that might be a little cheaper or more conveinent?....thanks again...
     
  4. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    Block weights (cheap dumbells can be aquired from secondhand sports stores like secondhand sports) and sledge hammer levering (an 8 lb hammer goes a LONG way. I'm still playing with my 6lb hammer for front levering). and for grappling, rope climbing is good medicine. I try to get 10 climbs in 20 minutes on mine, once I can do that, I'm gonna add some weight.
     
  5. AxeGrinder

    AxeGrinder Purple Belt

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    thanks urban, appreciate it...we'll see what happens...
     
  6. Freestyler

    Freestyler Purple Belt

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    If im not mistaken...Buddy i used to lift with would take a BB...add the necessary weight...instead of facing it, turn his back to it, pick it up and do like a wrist curl.
     
  7. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    yeah, but why would you do that body builder horse shit when there are exercises that are a thousand more productive ways to develop your grip?
     
  8. cockysprinter

    cockysprinter Purple Belt

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    hey im gonna start training my forearms too. im wondering, do wrist curls and reverse wrist curls have a place in grip training at all? and what about training the finger extensors? it seems to me that for complete forearm development you need to train those too.
     
  9. AxeGrinder

    AxeGrinder Purple Belt

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    anyone one know how professional arm wrestlers train there forearms?...anyway, like urban said, there are alot better and more convienent way to strengthen forearms than doing typical body builder exercises...
     
  10. Urban? I have a question on ropes.

    I hung up a rope in my backyard but the rope isn't that thick at all.

    It is .75 of an inch compared to your 1.5-2 inch rope.

    Is the bigger it is the harder?
     
  11. Bizarro

    Bizarro Blue Belt

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    instead of barbell wrist curls i do plate wrist curls. its the same thing except u use a plate. its good because along with strengthening wrists, it puts pressure on the fingers and those get worked well too. id also say that reverse wrist curls and finger extensors would be considered important in order to have a good balance between the flexor/extensor muscles.
     
  12. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    it works your grip more. that's like asking if a 2" barbell is harder than a 1" barbell. And I think it's more specific for more sports. In grappling (much like climbing a thick rope or pulling on a thickbar) you will use your grip in combination with your back. You have to grip hard if you ever pull on someone when you roll cause the other person isn't going to let you do what you want: they're gonna fucking struggle.

    My suggestion, get three or four lengths of your .75 inch rope and either braid (with three) or do that crazy four way braid you used to make keychains with in camp to make a suitably thick rope. Or just go down to osh and buy a 1.5" rope or order soem 2" or bigger shit online.
     
  13. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    I like Plate curls (not plate wrist curls) for wrist work. I should probably incorporate them into my lower arm work more.

    Also, anyone who doesn't have 20+ feet to hang a rope (I didn't think I did till I figured I could just hang it on an oak tree out back) can just buy 4' or so of rope and sling it over a pullup bar for a similar effect. It's not quite the same and I like climbing a lot better, but it will do in a pinch.
     
  14. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    go to google and type in "armwrestling" you will be absolutely amazed at the amount of shit you find.
     
  15. my big toe

    my big toe Yellow Belt

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  16. SpAzNeT

    SpAzNeT Blue Belt

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    double post
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2013
  17. savage-

    savage- White Belt

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    for the levering could you just use a dumbbell or barbell with weight only on one side?
     
  18. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    you could, but it doesn't produce the same torque that a hammer does. Because the head is the bulk of the weight we can call the handle massless (the center of gravity of a sledgehammer is often in the head itself anyways). This gives an equation where the moment of inertia is basically a ring formed with the radius equal to the length of handle being used.

    With a dumbell, you have a much smaller radius and must use much larger weights to compensate for that. It can be done but there are factors like stabilizing on the two unused planes of the exercise that are not accounted for and the handle itself has more mass than that of a hammer, allowing for some (but not much) counterbalance.

    a barbell's moment of inertia is fundementally different from that of a hammer. First you have the weighted end fucntioning as a ring, the bar itself functioning as a disc (adding to the overal resistance), the remaing and unused portion of the bar functioning as a disc (which decreases in size as the other disc increases) and any weight on the opposite end fucntioning as a ring. there is also a matter of reversing any momentum and rotational forces that you build up by rotating the two ends.

    let me break it down for you:

    You are minding your own business walking through a forest when all of a sudden you come to the three bears house. After eating all their corned beef hash and taking a nap you find a sledge hammer, an adjustable dumbell, a barbell and a pile of weights.

    You grab the barbell first. Instictively you grab it in the middle to acheive balance and you begin to move to one end to find how much you can lever. easy going at first as the first couple inches don't have a big noticable difference, but soon you can feel the same increase in resistance in only half an inch, then a quarter of an inch. soon every 8th of an inch you're increasing the torque the same amount as you were with whole inches in the begining. "fuck this hokey non-linear increase in resistance horse shit, I'm gonna try the dumbell." you say, and so you do.

    You start piling on weights to one end of the dumbell, doing nifty figure eights and such. but you notice you have an alarming amount of control with such a short handle, and that the arcs you read about online don't seem to be nearly as difficult as they should be. in addition, the pretty figures you painted in the air with it don't seem to have uniform resistance on your wrist, and don't seem to be working the they should as you move it in circles and side to side. In fact, is as if the dominant gravitational force only pulled things down towards the earth and didn't give a shit at all about your side to side movements. "Enough of this non-uniform, momentum based bull shit!" you cry, "gimme the fuckin hammer!"

    Well just then the bears return from their. and you begin to bludgen the holy hell out of them with your sledge! I mean really beating their fucking heads in! Blood is flying everywhere as you crack their skulls and smash in their eye sockets, break their noses, knock in their teeth and pound off a jaw or two. As you stand on a pile of bloodied, brown fur, you realize two things: 1) you now have breakfast for at least a week. and 2) the handle of a sledge hammer allows for great, uniform, linearly increasing resistance for leverage exercises. then you head up stairs and finish fucking Goldilockes (you only came down in the first place to get the needy bitch a glass of water) before helping yourself to a well deserved beer from the bear's fridge.

    And they all lived happily ever after... except for the bears, who died of course, but turned into very nice rugs.
     
  19. Herculean

    Herculean Purple Belt

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    lol
    beautiful story

    that needs to go in a post hall of fame or somethnig
     
  20. killer_kicks88

    killer_kicks88 Green Belt

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    WOW...i still say that working the gymnastic rings is tough grip work cuz some of the things you do on the rings can put out up to 10X your bodyweight in pressure...although, I'm quite partial to sledgehammer training and towel training, the sledge works really well on your wrists and forearms, and on the towels i don't feel anything in my forearms or wrists, but in my fingers and hands, OMG its a tough workout, those to things, sledge and towel work are teh best (or at least most fun) in my view
     

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