Bar exercises--need experts here

thecas

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My home shared gym had the weights removed because some kiddy got injured from them. So I chanced upon this improvision:

There is a long pull up bar hanging at the end of the cables. I unlatched it and used it as my weight.

It weighs only, say, 2or3 kg? [5-6 pds]. However, due to its length, when I held it at one end and tried to do a bicep curl, it felt like my 1 rep max on the dumdbell.

I shall list the advantages of training with it:

1] I did 20 reverse bicep curls. the next day my reverse forearm felt sore like never did when i used the dumbbells. In short, it seems more stablelizers r used[more of the free weight advantage]

2]If I am right about my physics, the weight i lifted was only the 2-3 kg, even though the effect of it being like a 20kg dumbell on my biceps were there. What it means that it is good for people with back problems or with suspect knees, like me

3]It can better to train me to handle pole like things which is more practical in the streets. Things like the leg of a chair, poles themselves, brooms, sticks etc. The unstable nature of it is distinct from a block of very heavy things, which are not as useful.


I am planning to completely substitute dumbbells with the bar. I guess you all at the gyms can use the barbell bar..just hold it at various lengths to vary the 'weight'.[though may have to plaster up the sharp edges] Can someone list me even one con, other than that more space is needed?
 
lol ok there are much more useful things you can do but your on the right track.

stabalizer strength is very usefull, and yes that is what got worked in your arm.
 
Hey, at least you're doing your best to get in a workout with whatever you have on hand. The bar might have its uses but I wouldn't put too much stock in it. In your case you can focus on bodyweight exercises and use the bar for some specific work though. Largely a lot would depend on how developed you are and what your goals are.


thecas said:
Can someone list me even one con, other than that more space is needed?

1) It takes weight to build strength. Deadlifts and leg exercises aren't going to be helped by the bar. It won't weigh enough for any kind of pressing (Bench or overhead).

2) Your entire workout (and hence your progress) will be limited by whatever type of odd leverage you can get to work that 3 kilos against yourself.

3) You'll be constantly trying to re-invent the wheel instead of being able to rely on tried and true exercises.
 
you used leverage to make the bar much more difficult to lift than normal. Sounds like a decent forearm exercise, but I don't know how you can use this technique for other lifts aside from curls.

Reattach the pullup bar to the chains and work on some pullups/chins. That is a far better exercise.
 
I can tell what I would do with that bar.

I would swordfight my imaginary friend. Good GPP and people think you're crazy enough that they leave you alone during training.
 
at first i though all was lost, but here are a few ideas:

1. sledge levering with the bar, similar to what you are doing
2. get a chain a plank of wood and a hook and build one of those Bruce Lee isometric contraptions, if you don't know what im talking about, ask me.
3. very high rep bodyweight exercises like squats, pushups, chins, burpees and core exercises
4. advanced bodyweight exercises like one arm pushups, handstand pushups, pistols, one arm pullups, dragon flags, planche variations, flags and lever variations + plyometrics
5. get some gymnastic rings
6. make a sand bag

if you combine all of those you'll still get a pretty damn good workout
 
IMO do handstand pushups, pushups, pullups, pistols, hanging leg raises.
The bar won't get you strong.
 
Grady said:
you used leverage to make the bar much more difficult to lift than normal. Sounds like a decent forearm exercise, but I don't know how you can use this technique for other lifts aside from curls.

Reattach the pullup bar to the chains and work on some pullups/chins. That is a far better exercise.

This is the main answer here. But why cant it totally substitute the dumbell?

I can think of Deltoit raises, Another modified to work your triceps, When laying down on a bench work your pecs or when you turn over, the back[I do not memorise the names of the exercises, so here]

People are still saying it just cant substitute dumbell but why? Any reasons? Only for the legs and core part, yes, But for almost every workout for the upper body it does seem worksble.

Still, comments, esp listing reasons, welcomed
 
There is one simple fact for which it cannot replace a dumbell.

Progressive loading.

forget this bar.
 
Noskill said:
There is one simple fact for which it cannot replace a dumbell.

Progressive loading.

forget this bar.

I thought the reason is given in the first post. Here, you 'load progressively' by varying where you hold it. The closer to centre, the lighter it is. Remember its a bar[unantagonistically :) ]
 
I got 2 of those magical bars at home. I call them 'my sledges'. I love my sledges. They're great tools. But I use them exclusively for what I call 'grip work'. Of course I could bang through my appartment walls with them for GPP, but then I would be a silly homeless bum.

Your bar will be useful for doing lever work. If you one arm bench with it, holding it by the end you'll be doing lever work. If you row it in the same manner you'll be doing lever work. You may do whatever you want with it you'll still be doing lever work. Except wrecking through your appartment walls. But don't do that.

Lever work is good. I love it, but it is a subclass of the forementioned 'grip work'.
Lever your bar, allright, but you've got to do the bw stuff and sandbag carrying and oddball training mentioned by other posters. Otherwise all you'll be doing is lever work.
 

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