Training muscular endurance after failed guillotine or triangle?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Old Timey, Apr 20, 2008.

  1. Old Timey

    Old Timey White Belt

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    You often see a fighter lock in a guillotine, get really close to a submission, but the guy doesn't tap and he needs to let go. This often leads to a turning point in the fight with the fighter who almost had the tap being too gassed to keep up his former pace.

    If you remember Penn/Hughes 2, BJ seemed to gas this same way, but from a triangle.

    So my question is: Do any of you who train for MMA or sub-wreslting train for this? It almost seems like a isometric flex - or flexing as hard as you can for a point in time, then back to cardio.

    any thoughts?
     
  2. TXTAPOUT

    TXTAPOUT Yellow Belt

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    the best thing to do is to train to push back your lactic acid threshold. this will keep away that empty gas tank feeling.
    if you train to push your lactic acid threshold and you circuit train i think that will take care of the problem
     
  3. Revok

    Revok Brown Belt

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    You know, this is one of the times a grappling dummy is really useful. You can really sink a choke in and hold it at max force for as long as your muscle holds out, which of course is simply not polite do with a living training partner. If you haven't got a dummy just grab a bundle of rolled up mats or whatever and RNC and triangle it to death.

    Of course priority 1 is to train to be better at chokes and to recognise situations when the full application of strength would be prudent. Strength is hardly ever an adequate substitute for leverage.
     
  4. Reloaded

    Reloaded Yellow Belt

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    Couldn't agree more... it's not a strength move if it's sunk in correctly. The biggest tip I know for the guillotine is to make sure you have you thumbs up towards your opponents throat... that means you'll be burying the blade of your arm into his neck which creates much more pressure then just having your arm flat against his neck.
     

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