Squatting Technique/Sitting Back

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Espo, Sep 19, 2005.

  1. Espo

    Espo Purple Belt

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    Most people advocate sitting back into the squat, but when I sit back the lift begins to resemble a good morning on my way up. This can't be good. It is more natural to me to descend straight down. Is this acceptable or would this hamper me in the long run? On a side note, I go ass to grass and use no lifting gear.
     
  2. hughes

    hughes Beltless Bum

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    I'm regurgitating info here so please bear with me;

    What you're doing is due to a muscular imbalance, your lower back is compensating for a weakness in your legs, do front squats/unilateral leg movements etc to correct it.

    At least I think that's it, if I'm wrong I'm sure I'll be corrected.
     
  3. OpethDrums

    OpethDrums Banned Banned

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    ass to the grass really isnt the proper way to squat.. but i have used it and gotten results
     
  4. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest

    Hammer your posterior chain.
     
  5. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest


    Why isn't it?
     
  6. colinm

    colinm Brown Belt

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    widening my stance did wonders for my squat form. it lets me stay a lot more upright and the next day my lower back isnt always uber-sore like it used to be. i also feel the stress in my hams, hips and glutes more.
     
  7. Chad Hamilton

    Chad Hamilton Amateur Fighter

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    And you can usually move more weight.
     
  8. JoeU1741

    JoeU1741 Yellow Belt

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    I got a great tip from Dan John, he said try doing front squats first (use a lighter weight at first) this helps teach the sitting back position and coming up shoulder and hips together. Worked really well for me. As for how low can you go, until your hamstrings touch your calves is pretty good, just down round your lower back (the point just above your ass) to get lower, that's too low. Also box squats are a good option to learn good technique as they work your posterior chain more.
     
  9. True2KungFu

    True2KungFu King Of No Pants

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    box squats my friend, they will show you the way.
     
  10. agentofoblivion

    agentofoblivion Orange Belt

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    i did box squats today for the first time in a while, a little below parallel, 3x10 with just 135, but it was pretty easy and ill get back up to alot, they are pretty fun though
     
  11. morganfreeman

    morganfreeman Brown Belt

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    I had a lot of trouble staying balanced when I first started squatting. It is only natural to lean forward if you feel like you are going to fall on your ass. Widening my stance helped alot ( I go with a the widest stance I can comfortably maintain). I injured my knee and my doctor gave me a bunch of rehabby exercises to do. One of them was bodyweight squats. For about a month I did hundreds of bw squats a day. I would put a broom handle over my shoulders and practice perfect form in front of the mirror. I then moved on to doing deep light oh squats at tabata intervals. I just started lifting again a few weeks ago, and I've already added twenty pounds to my previous squat pr. Although this isn't the most efficient way to learn how to squat, there is something to be said for taking the time to learn proper form. Deep squats felt unnatural to me, and for a good reason. Sitting back with a couple hundred pounds on your back below parallel is not the most stable of positions. It takes time to learn the appropriate stance and to develop stabilizing muscles. Until you do, you are just asking for an injury.
     
  12. CarnalSalvation

    CarnalSalvation Trying to make a Milankey

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    Sitting back is invariably superior, even with narrow stance squats, front squats or other "knee break" (as opposed to "hip break", in terms of where you move first). Here is a quick overview of how to wide, or semi-wide stance (athletic type) squat, using the sitting back style:

    1. Set-Up, get the bar in the right place on your back. Some people go lower than others, but nobody is better off with a highbar for powersquats. Squeeze your shoulder blades together, and make sure your upper back is nice and tight, and your lower back is in a hard static arch before you unrack the bar. If you're walking squats out (which you probably are) really work on getting the walk-out short and effecient. Don't spend a bunch of time dancing with the weight. Take a big belly full of ear and press your abs agaisnt your belt (if you're wearing one) or distend your 'belly" regardless.
    2. Descent. the first movement of the squat should be the hips/butt going backwards. Keep the head slightly elevated, chin up, chest out, back arched and push that butt out J-Lo style. Eventually you will reach a point where you feel like you have to "gm" to make depth, instead push your knees outwards, or "open up the groin" as Ed Coan said. You lean almost between your legs (and literally so if you are long of torso, big of belly, or both like me).
    3. Out of the Hole, once you have gone below parallel, it's time for the hard part; getting back up. The first thing I will say is key, because so many people do it wrong. The first thing you do, when you're ready to come out of the hole, is push your head and shoulders up AND back against the bar. Think almost of trying to throw the bar off yoru shoulders. Then shove your hips forward, and push with your heels. It is key that you keep yoru back arched, and your head up.

    It could also be a muscle imbalance. Lets start with the easy shit first. Increased core strength is always gonna help a lifter stay upright on the squat. Hit up some heavy sidebends and weighted sit-ups of various types. Also, if you feel experimental, try unracking and walking out weights in excess of your 1rm and standing for a count of 5-10 seconds.

    Now the harder part. Targeting muscle weaknesses ass you advance can be difficult, because sticking points may manifest in a place that suggest weakness of another area. Take the bench for example, you can have trouble locking out (normally indicating a tricep weakness) caused my a weak chest, and not getting enough speed off the chest. So my guess would be it's actually your hips/glutes that are potentially weak, if it's not a form issue. Solution? RDL's and/or Wide Stance GM's.
     
  13. peanut butter

    peanut butter Blue Belt

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    what about feet angles, does it matter
     
  14. Dash_Riprock

    Dash_Riprock Yellow Belt

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    I'm really glad to be hearing this. I just intuitively started doing the "head and shoulders" thing that you describe a few weeks ago. It has made a tremendous difference in coming out of the bottom position. Interesting stuff.
     
  15. Espo

    Espo Purple Belt

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    Thanks for the advice thus far.
     

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