Skinny man wants to gain weight!

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by Shadowdean, Sep 18, 2005.

  1. Shadowdean

    Shadowdean Fear the Menanite!!!

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2002
    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    14
    Well, I am 27 years old, 5'4, 110 lbs. I would like to add 10-15 lbs of muscle weight on. I know I have a pretty fast digestive system, not everything gets fully broken down and absorbed..I don't think I need to go into details on how I came to that conclusion. Genetically, my dad is 62 and weighs about 120 lbs. Are there any supliments that you all would recomend to add into my training routine to help me put on some lbs?
     
  2. Sonny

    Sonny Titanium Belt

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    48,407
    Likes Received:
    6,748
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Simply put you need to ingest more calories in order to pack on some pounds. Ideally you should be getting these extra calories from food but it wouldn't hurt to supplement with a meal replacement shake or protein shake if you're having trouble eating.

    When I bulked a couple of years ago, I basically ate every 2 hours no matter what. I even set my alarm in the middle of the night so I could get up and drink some whey with milk. Combined with proper training and rest I bulked up to around 205-210 lbs. at 5'7" tall and it was a pretty clean bulk.

    In terms of food choices I tried to stick with unprocessed foods but I wasn't superstrict which is something I could get away with. I mostly ate stuff like beef, chicken, eggs, cheese, whole wheat breads, whole wheat pasta, almond butter, peanut butter, cream cheese (on whole wheat bagels) and milk!
     
  3. Forbiden1

    Forbiden1 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2005
    Messages:
    1,490
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Florida
    I was in a similar situation, your a hard gainer like myself.

    Im 5'11 and weight 130, i got on a good diet an now work out alot and gained 10 pounds on muscle in about 2 months, not too bad.

    What i did was just buy protein shake, an consistently had those twice a day. Combined with eating more, you need to eat things with alot of protein.

    Ppl will reccomend 1 gram per how much u weigh, some reccommend more. Right now my current problem is that i think ive peaked. Im @ 140 now for over 3 weeks, cant seem to get passed that. Im currently trying to figure out a way, by adding just more protein to my diet, though i cant complain with 10 pounds of muscle, the body looks good, im nice an ripped.

    Damn 5'7 @ 200 pounds, you must of been an animal, freaking wolverine style lol.

    My goal is to hit 160, i think when i do that, my body would look like GSP...or atleast im hoping it will lol.
     
  4. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest

    No, you haven't peaked. I promise. Not even close.
     
  5. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    41,088
    Likes Received:
    2,434
    Location:
    Vegas
    No it isn't.
     
  6. supersudo

    supersudo Purple Belt

    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,819
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Diego
  7. aaron355

    aaron355 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    and i thought i was small being 5'5 170 pounds
    also another thing you have to remember about fighters weights is that MOST cut like around up2 20pounds before the weighins
    like lil matt hughs walks around at like 190pounds apparently and iv heard of baroni walking around at 220 in the past but is walking around about just under 200 now
    and he has to cut down for a WW :p
    and as for suppliments friend of put on about 55pounds in a matter of about 3months? that being said about2 hours at the gym 5-6 days a week but was in good shape before doing this so id recommend getting your body to its natural peak before using any hardkore supliments and what not the one my friend used was the REDBACK range of supliments which he just brought over the internet.

    good luck:p
     
  8. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest


    You have new information? Please share. Thanks in advance.
     
  9. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    41,088
    Likes Received:
    2,434
    Location:
    Vegas
    We've already had this discussion once. Shoving food down your gullet is not all there is to gaining lean muscle mass. "Eat more" as much as you'd like it to be is not viable training advice. If it were there'd be no such thing as hard-gainers, those who actually eat all day long and don't gain a pound partly because they're not eating the proper kinds of food.

    Your statement in it's miniscule nature equates to saying "if you want to go faster, put more gas in your car." It has a bottom-line inherent truth, but does nothing to inform or educate for maximum health and the best all-around results.

    And no I'm not citing a source or posting a study, frankly I'm getting a little sick of that crap.
     
  10. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest


    For gaining weight, you have to eat more. This means getting plenty of protein, and calories. Whether you eat a chicken sandwich or a supreme pizza equates to exactly the same amount of fat gain. "Eat more" is then viable advice.
     
  11. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    41,088
    Likes Received:
    2,434
    Location:
    Vegas
    That is your opinion based I'm sure on things you've read. However most medical professionals would disagree that a supreme pizza and a chicken sandwich equate to the same amount of fat gain. I'd like to see a person who is a professional athlete in supreme condition, who lives off of junk food.

    That is simply not the case, never has been, never will be.

    And yes, you have to eat more to gain "weight"...specifically to gain lean muscle mass, it requires much more than eating more, however. Training is as important, as is rest cycles, there are many other factors.
     
  12. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest

    On the contrary. It's not my opinion. It's a fact. Being a fact, it can be proven.

    And who said anythingthing about living off junkfood? how do we categorize junkfood anyway? Are there only two types of food (good and bad)? How is the distinction made?
     
  13. Chad Hamilton

    Chad Hamilton Amateur Fighter

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,998
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    DC
    junk food = anything that is not a complete whole food source.

    simple.


    And Aaron, you're arguing with the wrong cat.
     
  14. neosamurai1979

    neosamurai1979 Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2005
    Messages:
    816
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    In a van down by the river!!!!
    Are you lifting weights? That alone will put on muscle and weight if you're lifting consistently.
     
  15. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest

    You're joking about this definition right?


    I'll take my chances.
     
  16. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest

    Not alone it won't.
     
  17. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest

    Here's a very simplistic view from Lyle Mcdonals'd book:

    " So is a calorie a calorie? Yes and no. Based on the data, my general feeling is this:

    1. A sufficient protein intake will always beat out an insufficient protein intake, no matter what you do. Since all of the diets described in this book are based around sufficient protein, this is a non-issue.

    2. Assuming caloric intake can be controlled (and protein is adequate of course), shuffling of carbs and fats tends to have a minor, approaching negligble effect.

    3. There might be exceptions at the extremes (folks going to single digit bodyfat or extreme obesity) but that doesn't apply to the majority of folks.

    In this respect, given adequate protein, it seems to matter very little what diet is chosen. From a weight or bodyfat standpoint, high carb should be as good as low-carb. Right? Well, no. The problem is that there's a HUGE assumption built into statement #2 above: that calories can be controlled under a given set of conditions. As has been found repeatedly in the real-world, this simply isn't a safe assumption.

    Put a little bit differently, it might very well be possible to lose all the weight/fat you wanted on a calorie controlled junk-food diet with some high quality protein source. The problem that would probably arise is that most people wouldn't be able to control their hunger or appetite on such a diet and they'd probably end up eating more in the long run. In eating more, they'd either lose less weight/fat or even gain it. Even if a given dietary approach appears optimal for some reason, if you can't control your caloric intake, and end up eating more because of it, it won't produce results."
     
  18. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    41,088
    Likes Received:
    2,434
    Location:
    Vegas
    You can prove it? How, by citing studies? No, proof is not standing on the shoulders of those who study things (or claim to) and citing their own intelligence as supplement to your own.

    This is why I disagree with citing studies, I've seen many a study with a ludicrous conclusion in my time, so I tend not to believe everything I read. People are fallable, and always tend to have their own personal agendas.

    By your comment about "junk food", it seems you do have ideas as to which kinds of food are proper and improper to eat. If that's the case then what I'm saying is post those ideas instead of your one-to-two word advisories that equate to quick dismissal. I mean people don't even ask you what they should eat anymore I've noticed. Common sense tells them that as I said "eat more" is not the only or precise answer to accomplishing an example goal of gaining lean muscle mass.

    Why?

    Because it insinuates that you can stuff yourself with whatever you like. Again, this is simply not the case. There is not and never will be any reason to risk becoming diabetic, having blood-pressure problems, developing cholesterol problems or arterial blockage, or storing bodyfat as opposed to building muscle mass (because the body uses different caloric sources differently, and everyone's bodies function slightly differently usually based on genetics and what their lifestyle is like) to accomplish the simple goal of putting on muscle. There is a reason that as a rule of thumb in any form of athletics, one should adhere to a HEALTHY regimen of sources for caloric intake as opposed to whatever they set their eyes on. There is also a reason that bodybuilders (who are traditionally the most extreme athletes to go from bulking to cutting phases by drastic measures) tend to get FATTER during their off-seasons as opposed to just plain "bigger" (meaning there is no distinction between gaining either fat or muscle mass) and have to cut certain things from their caloric intake to lose the bodyfat for their shows.

    If anyone with half a brain reviews your posts they would be led to believe:

    1) Source of caloric intake is absolutely irrelevant if you're looking to gain muscle.
    2) Times of day of eating are absolutelty irrelevant, having no effect on metabolic function.

    These things are simply misleading, wether you have one or two studies that back them or not is not the point. In dealing with this issue on a daily basis and seeing people who cannot figure out for the life of them why they can't gain more muscle and lose more fat when their caloric intake, rest cycles, and training regimens are sufficient...and it comes down to the simple fact that the sources of their calories is the problem, I simply can't let this kind of thing fly.
     
  19. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    41,088
    Likes Received:
    2,434
    Location:
    Vegas
    This paragraph right here illustrates what I'm talking about. The first statement. It MIGHT be possible. That means it's not absolute, meaning people shouldn't take it as being an absolute...in not being an absolute, that makes it not a fact, but a speculation.

    And uncontrollable hunger? Hmm, I wonder where that comes from. Considering the body becomes uncontrollably hungry when there is insufficient nutrient intake.
     
  20. Aaron Howard

    Aaron Howard Guest

    1) Never said that.
    2) Never said that either.

    We're talking about fat gain, as per the question stated.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.