(Military) press world records

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Miiiiiiighty, Sep 24, 2010.

  1. Miiiiiiighty

    Miiiiiiighty Silver Belt

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    I've been doing some researches on the net to find what the

    -standing OH press
    -seated (military) press
    -seated behind the neck press

    world records are ...

    Can anyone enlighten me on that subject as I have troubles finding a proper answer ...
    I found out that Kaz behing the neck pressed 448lbs times 3 and Ed Coan seated military pressed 475 lbs but I don't know what the WR are .


    ps : I'm searching this because a very strong guy at my gym told me "he personnally witnessed" a guy here in Toulouse , France doing 6 reps of seated behind the neck military press @ 200kg (440lbs) , which I of course don't buy and I'm calling the BS on him ( even if the guy is roided to the eyes ) .
     
  2. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

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    Well it's hard to find records on the press or any variant since it hasn't been a competition lift since 1972 (where it was part of the clean and press). In 1972, the world record was 236.5kg (520 lbs), set by Vasilily Alekseyev. An estimate of a 1rm of the person in your example ends up just under this.
     
  3. XTrainer

    XTrainer Red Belt

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    For the record, there is no such thing as a seated military press...by definition, a military press is done standing...a press done standing without the feet close together and allowing some degree of layback is just called a press. Not saying this to nag, I'm saying this because it's silly that people have to write "standing overhead press" in their logs to denote what should be one of the most popular and well recognized lifts, the press.
     
  4. halotestin**

    halotestin** Purple Belt

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    delete
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  5. ludo66

    ludo66 White Belt

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    This- no way is someone doing a strict seated press of 6 reps @200kg.
     
  6. halotestin**

    halotestin** Purple Belt

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    That is most likely qualified bullshit...
    One of the strongest guys in the world are Misha Koklyaev, here he is pushpressing 200kg, although he is slightly stronger now, I don't think he could do behind the neck presses with 448 lbs, and I don't think anyone else could either, not Savickas nor Poundstone..



    Edit: 2 years later, 220 kg

     
  7. Lars

    Lars Purple Belt

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    he used to much leg in the move
     
  8. Denbob99

    Denbob99 Orange Belt

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    Its a push press.
     
  9. Keith Wassung

    Keith Wassung <img src="http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/4586/

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    Ken Patera was reported to have done 525 after taking the weight off of the racks. I have heard that Gary Taylor has done well into the 500's. Again form is always an issue. I still say that the best test of overhead strength would be a 70 degree incline press but of course when doing a standing press, there is more than just upper body strength involved.
     
  10. ThePitBull32

    ThePitBull32 Green Belt

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    From now on I will just write "press".
     
  11. Searcher

    Searcher Yellow Belt

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    The olympic style press seems to finish differently than the overhead press. The overhead press has your head go through, the oly and even strongman finishes don't look that way. I've considered it might be because the guys doing it are big, but it seems they just might not have the flexibility to do that. Also, not pushing your head through might help you lift more weight.
     
  12. scoopj

    scoopj ackson

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    On an OHP, pushing your head through helps you to lift more weight. By doing so, you're able to keep a straight bar path over your center of gravity. If you don't push your head through, the weight is out in front a bit. Try both variations w/o a bar and see which feels more secure/stronger.
     
  13. XTrainer

    XTrainer Red Belt

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    Excellent :D It's just a pet peeve of mine...I mean, every other major lift has a one-word name: "squat," "deadlift," "clean," "jerk," "snatch," and so forth. The only exception is "bench press," but even that is an adaption of the classic "press," so it makes sense that it would have a second word as a modifier.

    But "standing overhead press?" Why put the press in the "three-word-lifts" category along with "bosu ball curls," "lying triceps extensions," and "seated preacher curls?"

    The press is deserving of being in the "one word lift" category. The only way to reverse the trend is to start calling the press "the press" and insist people assume it to be a "standing overhead press."

    /silly rant.
     
  14. XTrainer

    XTrainer Red Belt

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    Agreed, not pushing your head through is terrible advice, IMO. It's much more difficult to press with the weight out in front of you than over you.
     
  15. ExtremeStandard

    ExtremeStandard Yellow Belt

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    I've tried looking for press records, and the only ones I could find were clean and press records from old Olympic lifters in the 70's and 80's no success with other types of presses.
     
  16. Keith Wassung

    Keith Wassung <img src="http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/4586/

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    Probably the most famous standing overhead press in modern history was made by Bill March at the 1969 Senior Nationals. Weighing 224lbs he pressed 390 with absolutely no leg drive, hip thrust or back bend whatsover. quite a feat
     
  17. HONOS

    HONOS Yellow Belt

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    As for behind the neck pressing: This is Ed Coan doing 400lbs seated.



    6 reps at 440lbs doensn't seem very plausible to me.
     
  18. Searcher

    Searcher Yellow Belt

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    I didn't say not to push you're head through. Watch olympic pressing, watch Vasily, watch log pressing. It doesn't look like they put their head through. I'm thinking maybe not doing it helps put some chest into it. I don't know, its not advice, its just food for thought. I push my head through, I feel the difference when pushing your head through (in my head its correct technique), I'm just wondering why the pro's don't do it.
     
  19. Lard-ass

    Lard-ass Sodomizer

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    its easier to put up big numbers in seated press compared to the press.

    By leaning back against the backsupport (the upright bench) you're basically turning the press into an incline benchpress. On top of that, doing btn press seated you take away much of the range of motion, making it easier.
     
  20. HONOS

    HONOS Yellow Belt

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    He does put his head trough. The only thing is that he uses quite a lot of lay back, which of course does enable him to put more chest into it. Same goes goes for Serge Reddings press, which is a lot more strict in terms of not using leg drive.

     

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