max reps on the big three lifts

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by lensls1, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. lensls1

    lensls1 Yellow Belt

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    I'm 33, 6'2", 210 and have just recovered from a 6 month injury. I had abductor tendonitis from squatting on a smith machine. I know what you are thinking, and I
     
  2. takeahnase

    takeahnase watching the swarm

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    Personally, I would guess that maxing out reps with 405 in the deadlift would be more harmful on average than trying to increase weight. No idea what respectable rep ranges are for the weights you mentioned.
     
  3. eldonhoke

    eldonhoke Yellow Belt

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  4. eldonhoke

    eldonhoke Yellow Belt

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    sorry reread, thought you were asking for your max.
     
  5. rEmY

    rEmY Needs to eat more

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    If you're prone to injury, I wouldn't recommend max reps; I would guess that form breaks down over higher reps. Also, I think that the best way of increasing reps is to get a higher 1RM strength i.e. 405 doesn't feel so bad after 465.
     
  6. the_harbinger

    the_harbinger Orange Belt

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    I personally like to use the Big Three as indicator lifts of whether or not I'm making progress...so I keep the reps low (1-3). If you prefer higher reps for the squat or bench that's fine, but I'd advise you to consider if doing higher reps on deadlifts are worth it. A movement that involves so much importance on back movement has a large margin for error and each rep just increases it.
     
  7. mjfgf

    mjfgf Yellow Belt

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    Those are respectable numbers....as you probably know, it's not really about having a huge max lift in mma training. As I've gotten older, I have had to remind myself of this more than once. I am fairly injury prone myself due to old injuries and wear and tear from college football. I just try to listen to my body and not let my ego get me in trouble. I can't go super heavy all of the time, and every few months I try and take a week off.
     
  8. lensls1

    lensls1 Yellow Belt

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    Thanks for the responses. I will stay away from repping out on the deadlift, but I find that max reps really do help me on the other two lifts (i.e., bench and squat). Particularly, in benching where I find that my elbows hurt when I use heavy weight in the 5 rep range. I have never attempted a one rep max and probably never will for fear of injuring himself. When I stay in 10+ rep range my elbows feel great, no pain what so ever. The same for my knees when I'm squatting in the 10+ rep range. I also have to becareful of my groin so I squat using a narrow stance and don't go ATG.

    As for the deadlift, it really is a bad lift for me as I'm fairly tall @ 6'2" with relatively shorter arms, but really long legs. My form also sucks almost like I'm SLDL. I'll stick to deadlifting 405 until I can comfortable do 8 reps. Then maybe I'll add a little weight.

    I remember reading somewhere that football teams use max reps while benching 225 as a measureing stick of strength and muscular endurance. Any idea how many reps is considered good?
     

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