Learning Muay Thai

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by MCanavan6, Apr 9, 2008.

  1. MCanavan6

    MCanavan6 White Belt

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    I'm going to start learning Muay Thai this summer once I get out of school and have about 4 months before I head back. I will continue training at school but not as often as I have many other things going on. How long does it usually take for someone to learn the basics of Muay Thai? This is assuming 3 days a week for 2 hours a day. I will be training at Sityodtong, if that matters much. I know everyone is different but in 4 months will I have a general understanding of Muay Thai or still be learning the very basics?
     
  2. Round1

    Round1 Orange Belt

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    Obviously there is no simple answer to this question. It all depends on the individual, the school, and what you consider "the basics” 3 months of steady training should be enough to get a good start. Don't procrastinate and don’t get lazy on your training.
     
  3. Rinksterk**

    Rinksterk** Banned Banned

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    in 4 months you probably be taught most of the basics and probably even sparred.
     
  4. Pro Killer

    Pro Killer Black Belt

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    Training twice a week for me in Boxing 3months. So I was pleased to see that what I was thinking is along the lines of others in the thread. At this point you should be badass compared to a regular none trained guy but just a rookie to the Boxers who've been doing it before so You may not feel like you've progressed tremendously but you probably progress the most in that 3 month period than any other.
     
  5. Good to know thanks.:D
     
  6. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Truth is, you never stop learning the basics and to actually perfect the basics takes many years of training. However, 4 months should give you a basic understanding of the fundamentals and even some practical application (sparring). 4 months will give you enough knowlege of the basics that you can keep practicing them throughout the year without having as much time to commit! Not to mention, 4 months will get you in great shape!
     
  7. MCanavan6

    MCanavan6 White Belt

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    Alright so I should be pretty good after the 4 months. How much longer until someone is no longer considered a beginner and becomes intermediate or advanced?
     
  8. Really thats great.:D
     
  9. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    When you no longer use what you have learned like a beginner.......... I know, it's vague, but, it is the only honest answer to the question!
     
  10. villasenor

    villasenor boom, *****!!

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    damn, these kids want everything fast these days!

    better to take your time and be a good "intermediate" than a crappy pro with virtually no technique
     
  11. Rinksterk**

    Rinksterk** Banned Banned

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    You got that right. This reminds me of the beginning BJJers who always ask about when they'll get their blue belt. Quit worrying about that shit and just train.
     
  12. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Amen!
     
  13. vince89

    vince89 Banned Banned

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    Easy to learn, hard to master.
     
  14. GrazZ

    GrazZ Guest

    just to let you know, the odds of you even being able to train 3 times a week are like 0% i *guarantee* you will be SO SORE after your first class you wont be able to go more than once a week to start and if you arent, you arent working hard enough :p
     
  15. No Quarter

    No Quarter Blue Belt

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    I have been training MT for almost 2 years now, and I am still learning, especially the clinch work.
     
  16. vangor

    vangor Banned Banned

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    I hate how Muy Thai has become so popular because of the UFC. Boxing is a much better skill to learn for the simple fact that a good boxer will almost always beat a good muy thai or kickboxer. Punches are much more effective and more versatile in a fight than kicks, and since Muy Thai fighters aren't nearly as good with their hands they're sitting ducks for any good boxer who comes in on them.
     
  17. RJ Powell**

    RJ Powell** Banned Banned

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    Reminds me of 70% of MMA fighters!


    OH! ZING!

    but seriously, alot of up and comers in MMA should really focus on striking technique and basic ring strategy instead of just throwing themselves into competition.

    Some fighters look like they are having seizures at each other in the standup.
     
  18. vangor

    vangor Banned Banned

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    Don't believe the hype on Muy Thai or kickboxing though. Boxing is the best and most effective stricking sport out there.
     
  19. RJ Powell**

    RJ Powell** Banned Banned

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    Vangor, i think you are being a little biased and bitter here.

    I do agree that boxing is an excellent base striking art for MMA, but somewhere down the line you will have to branch out, just like Marcus davis did as an example.

    One isn't better than the other. I know you are probably just annoyed that muay thai gets more attention than boxing.

    But for the record, even top kickboxers hire boxing trainers to help them sharpen up their hands. Shows how indespensable good hands are.
     
  20. RJ Powell**

    RJ Powell** Banned Banned

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    Punches definitely have more use than kicks in MMA, most of the time. Lets just say that you would have to be a kicking expert to do well with them in MMA compared to if you just learn a little boxing. But in kickboxing i am afraid kicks are just as potent as punches.

    and "Muay Thai" fighters are FAR from sitting ducks against good boxers, we aren't talking K-1 here, a vicious thai clinch can overwhelm and completely dismantle the best inside boxer.

    Actually, that is what thais look for when they fight foreigners, they are waiting for them to come into clinching range to box. They usually neutralize the punching with the stophands technique and slip they're hands around to the back of the neck, then proceed to deliver knees.

    reminds me of an old muay thai saying.

    Punch beats kick > kick beats elbow > elbow beats knee > knee beats punch.
     

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