Hardest/Easiest Striking Art to Master?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by El Ninja, Mar 27, 2008.

  1. El Ninja

    El Ninja Blue Belt

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    In your opinion, what is? Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay-Thai, Karate, etc?
     
  2. Tre5sev

    Tre5sev Blue Belt

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    I'd say they all are equally hard to "master". Each of the aforementioned art's take years of dedication and hard work. But that is assuming that anyone can really "master" an art.
     
  3. El Ninja

    El Ninja Blue Belt

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    Well not really master. But to become really, really good at.
     
  4. dkickboxer

    dkickboxer Banned Banned

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    Well, I think boxing is the hardest to make it to the very top of when it comes to competing.
     
  5. Knucks

    Knucks White Belt

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    from seeing the records of the fighters on the contender asia, id say it takes alot more fights to make it near the top in thai boxing but i think boxing is definately hard to make it to the top or even make a living off it.
     
  6. stlnl2

    stlnl2 Blue Belt

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    I dont know, But I have to ask who is that girl in your avatar pic? Everytime I see that picture my mind goes blank and I cant read what you post.
     
  7. RandomXMAN

    RandomXMAN Green Belt

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    Its all individual
     
  8. MMAftfw**

    MMAftfw** Banned Banned

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    Depends on you and your body. Some people just naturally drift more in one way or another so i'd just experiment with some different things and then whatever feels best make your base and then build the other things around it as supplement.
     
  9. Soul Rebel

    Soul Rebel Guest

    Hardest: capoeira?
     
  10. Yanoush

    Yanoush Guest

    Boxing is definitely hardest to make it all the way. There is way too much variety and competition
     
  11. Guards

    Guards Blue Belt

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    I think on a 'skill acquisition' level, and less of a 'competition basis', things like Boxing are pretty cake by comparison. There are only a few fundamental movements in themself to become 'good at' and then it's all 'How well can I employ this technique against a live opponent?'

    If it were technique alone, I would list some style like Capoeira and Muay Boran.
     
  12. No Quarter

    No Quarter Blue Belt

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    Yes.....who is she?

    "I'm sporting a tremendous woody"
     
  13. Chonbody

    Chonbody Guest

    For those of us not winning the UFC championship belts and merely wish to learn the damn art itself, I'd say they are all fairly difficult but that MT is the easiest to pick up. And I practice MT myself, I'm not trying to take anything away.
     
  14. Sudonym

    Sudonym Blue Belt

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    usually the easiest to master are the weakest once mastered, whereas the harder styles to master arent as effective early on, its really about how much time you are willing to put in
     
  15. Sudonym

    Sudonym Blue Belt

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    that said, maybe karate or TKD only if trained full contact , this is excluding exotic styles like capoeria
     
  16. T.J.T

    T.J.T Green Belt

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    I would say boxing is the "hardest" where MT is probably a bit "easier" then most. why? with boxing you get a left hand and a right hand, to most that would mean easier, but the technical work needed with boxing is amazing and truly takes your life to just get good. MT you get to do everything, kicks, elbows, knees, hands, so you can be good at a couple things and it will overshadow your weakness's. in boxing if you have a poor left hand punchest thats half of your arsinal, where and sport where you get to use as many as 8 attacks, even if your hands suck, you might be an amazing kicker.

    But to clarify, to be good at anything takes a long time and lots of hard work, it doesnt make one sport easier then the other, just maybe easier to hide your weakness's :p
     
  17. Gregster

    Gregster Black Belt

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    Seconded.

    Like any physical endeavor, the individual talents, proclivities, innate physical gifts of the person trying to achieve skill play a huge part. Some guys do better at basketball vs. football.

    Or perhaps more to the accurately: some guys do better at the 400, the 800, the long jump, the hurdle, the pole vault...or some do better at the pommel horse vs. the rings, uneven bars, parallel bars, or floor routine. You can go out for track and field or gymnastics, and be great at some facets but not others.

    Hence, some guys take to Karate, some to TKD, some to Muay Thai.

    Instruction is another factor; obviously, you'll never master a style if the teaching sucks ass. This may be wholly independent of how good the teacher is, as many elite athletes quite simply fail miserably when it comes to conveying the secrets to the success to a novice.

    And sometimes, your success depends on how well your learning style meshes with the teaching style of your instructor/coach. Some guys like to be ridden hard and pushed relentltessly, some prefer to be mentored. Sometimes, you may struggle futilely mastering a technqiue or hit a plateau in performance where it seems you will never get beyond a certain point when another coach with a different angle or take on training can show you a way you can assimilate better (I've seen it happen, it does quite a bit).
     
  18. Rinksterk**

    Rinksterk** Banned Banned

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    Yes it all depends. Some guys are gonna pick up boxing easier, some are gonna pick up karate easier and so forth. One guy here said he thought MT is easier to pick up than boxing. For me, boxing was a lot easier to train than MT.
     
  19. kyokushinjitsu

    kyokushinjitsu Orange Belt

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    In kyokushin, It is said that it takes at least 5 years to master a punch.
     
  20. Tim Chan

    Tim Chan Amateur Fighter

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    every art takes a lifetime to master.

    if i had to choose i would say zhaquan or some internal ma since it tends to take longer just to learn the basics compared to things like boxing, karate, wing chun, etc.
     

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