Got gassed in competition

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Jonah42, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. Jonah42

    Jonah42 Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Had my third comp yesterday, won my first fight but was very tired after it. Was exhausted all the way through the second fight and ended up losing on points, and then promptly exited the building to throw up everywhere. This happened previously at my first ever comp, second comp I was fine as the subs came quickly.

    Was supposed to have another match after the one I lost but pulled out due to feeling light headed and continuously vomiting. I'm definitely ashamed and embarrassed about pulling out.

    I'm certain that I could have done better had I not been so fatigued. Straight after the match I found myself coming up with the solutions to the problems my opponent was presenting me with.

    At the gym I can get through Rolling Classes which involve well over an hour of 5 minute rounds and 1 minute rests, so I don't know why I'm getting so exhausted in live competition.

    Is it just down to bad cardio? Not relaxed enough? Poor breathing? Nerves?

    I'd really appreciate input from anyone who's seen or has had experience with this.
     
  2. Gawd

    Gawd Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    Messages:
    3,566
    Likes Received:
    11
    Did you cut weight?
     
  3. Jonah42

    Jonah42 Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    No, but I do sometimes find it hard knowing what to eat and when on the day of a competition. Found it hard to eat anything that day, might be linked to nerves.
     
  4. randomg1t

    randomg1t EVERYTIME CHAMPION

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,615
    Likes Received:
    8,676
    adrenaline dump. i get it too, so bad i almost universally consider pulling out of my third match. always feel light headed and ready to puke.

    i'd guess more experience helps with this, as you simply get used to it. i've also come to the conclusion that i'm probably just not a competitor, because i get serious jitters before any competition.
     
  5. Funkoar

    Funkoar Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds like it could be a bit of an adrenaline dump.

    Being relieved after winning the first fight could have done it.

    Do you put a lot of pressure on yourself and get anxious/nervous?
     
  6. Shizzx

    Shizzx Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Messages:
    697
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    DE>Philly
    its a mixture of Nerves, cardio, and usually what you ate..

    if you weight in and ate a meal after wards alot of times that will do that to you.. I dont usually eat aynthing but some fruit or something light after i weight in or after my first match and watch your consumption of liquid also.. that will make you want to vomit if you intake too much.

    the Gassing part comes from the cardio. You might be good rolling during the sessions at practice but in competition its a constant pressure coming at you (usually). which is normal to fatigue.. Everyone fatigues.. its getting your Second wind back is what you are looking for... minimizing your fatigue to a short time is what you gotta work on... When you roll at practice.. dont take any breaks.. no water breaks, just keep going. when your exhausted.. Push harder... try to make through out the whole session without stopping. that will help you increase you second wind.


    When i started i use to pull out of my absolute matches all the time,. but i was determined to finish my regular matches... I went from doing 2-3 matches in tournaments to doing 5-6 divisions all in one day.. and now i compete in 4-6 division average winning them all...

    Keep it up.. you will start to see the improvement...
     
  7. DesertStomper**

    DesertStomper** Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2012
    Messages:
    4,539
    Likes Received:
    8
    That's a scary thought, because I haven't competed yet ( plan too ) and I get tired after about 25 minutes of 5 minute matches :(
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2012
  8. Mocex

    Mocex Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    0
    Got similar question.On my first bjj tournament i didnt have any problems with gassing, but problem for me were cramps and pain in forearm :S.I literally couldnt hold a bottle of water after my first match :S.In open division after holding some 220+ guy in triangle for at least 1 or 2 minutes and getting that tap i couldnt stand up and had cramps in my leggs too.I had to pull out of semis cause i couldnt walk :D
    anyone had similar experiences?
     
  9. BJ@LW&WW

    [email protected]&WW Gold Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Messages:
    21,118
    Likes Received:
    5,900
    Location:
    LA
    i noticed i get a bit more fatigued when im grappling someone I've never rolled with before. I think it's because you get accustomed to your training partners and their strengths/weaknesses and you have an idea of what to expect when going against them.

    As for cramping, i think it's simply because you're trying hard. i can make quite a few of my muscles cramp just by flexing them very hard for a few seconds.
     
  10. davidecibel

    davidecibel White Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's 'normal', I mean, to the point of puking is not that usual, but it's a mental thing, you probably are reaaally nervous and anxious and you don't even realize that. The only solution is compete more, you're gonna get used to it.

    Before starting grappling I used to do sanda (pretty much kickboxing)... when I started competing, after 1 match, I always felt like my lungs were BURNING, as if I had just ran a marathon, but those matches were only 3 3 minutes rounds, with 1 minute rest (sometime they even lasted less, you know :)), and I was in reaaaally good shape at the time. After several tournaments that sensation started fading.

    Also it's better if you try to recreate the same environment while training to get used to it.. it's hard to do since you get really familiar when you train so often with the same people but there are some ways.

    -organize mini-tournaments during sparring with all the others in the gym watching every roll and somebody acting as ref, it's obviously not the same but it helps.

    -try to go as a guest for a class in another local academy (ask permission to your instructor first, some gym do not allow this)... be polite and don't roll hard ofc, go there to see what's your reaction to rolling vs someone you have never seen
     
  11. Melkesyre

    Melkesyre Green Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    88
    Sounds like you are overly nervous.
     
  12. Jonah42

    Jonah42 Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    So I just need to learn how to relax more?

    The fitness side of things I know how to fix, I just need to train more. The mental side of things will be a bit trickier.
     
  13. Melkesyre

    Melkesyre Green Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    88
    I usually went through the same hell as you. For me it revolved around being overly nervous and also using way to much strenght way to often in the matches. Just try to be a little more tactical in your approach of the match, don't just use every technique with a lot of strenght when it isn't needed. Also, just calm down before the match, eat good food and don't put so much pressure on yourself. Being a little nervous is always good.
     
  14. deadlizard

    deadlizard cold blooded

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Messages:
    4,310
    Likes Received:
    123
    Unfortuantely, the only way to rid of this is to keep competing!
     
  15. Mad Sweeps

    Mad Sweeps Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,482
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    NorCal
    its nerves. most people who havent done years of sports get this.
     
  16. hell wall

    hell wall Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    821
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    oklahoma city
    try to take one of these supplements for nerves and up your cardio bro!!! Sam-E and rhodila rosea these two supplements are badass for nerves... and davidecibel is right about hosting your own mini tournaments!!
     
  17. Uchi Mata

    Uchi Mata Preaching the gospel of heel hooks and left kicks

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Messages:
    18,585
    Likes Received:
    4,160
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Probably these more likely than bad cardio. If you can roll full speed for 5+ rounds in the gym, especially against people better than you, then you should be fine for any tournament. The speed really isn't that different, though it is rougher.

    I've had problems with nerves for years, you get gassed in your first fight from the adrenaline dump, and you're screwed. A few things have really helped me get over this:

    1. Warm up thoroughly. Most people don't warm up enough. They do their normal gym warmups and are done long before their division starts...in the gym you would normally go through a whole class before rolling starts, you're not going to tire yourself out with easy warmups even if you do them for 30 minutes or so. A good warmup also takes the edge off your nerves as you force your (probably tense) muscles to loosen up and go through the motions. Long warmup, good stretch. And while you're doing this:

    2. Don't watch other fights. It's hard to go to a tournament and not watch matches, but for me at least watching lots of matches gets me really jacked up and excited for mine...overly so. Especially, don't watch matches in your division. It's not like you're going to change your game in the few minutes before your fights start, you don't need to scout anyone. Watching your own division just lets your opponents get in your head. I don't want to know who I'm fighting until I step out on the mat. If I can warm up and take a nap until my division's called, perfect. I first got that idea from Marcelo and Kron, and it's worked great for me.

    Breathing can definitely help if you're still too excited. If you have any meditation training, do that. I like to get on the mat as relaxed as I can, because simple being in competition gets me so jacked up that the best I can do is get back to a normal state of agitation. These things have worked well for me in avoiding being gassed.
     
  18. kintana

    kintana Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Messages:
    2,402
    Likes Received:
    43
    Location:
    Venezuela/europe
    Nerves and adrenaline were probably the main thing against you. It has happened to me. Calm down breathe and when you finish your first fight relax dont think so much about the next fight.

    When you do your first fight, dont get over anxious play our game.

    Physical issues could be rolling and a competition fight are very different. I would say I can roll 2 hours 5 to 8 minutes rounds and say I am good. But after my first competition ever I fought 5 minutes and felt dead tired. Part of that was nerves but I learned rolling and competing is very hard.

    I changed my condition and rolling strategy before a competition. Also kicked up my condition training by going 6-8 minutes of high intensity rounds and short 1 minute to 2 minute rest.

    My last competition I was very fresh.
     
  19. MindRipper

    MindRipper Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Good advice from Uchi.

    If you're not fueling the machine this could have a huge impact on performance. Hydration and proper nutrition are insulators from blood sugar crashes and a bunch of different anxiety. Also don't overdue the caffeine.

    I suffer from pretty serious anxiety and proper diet / exercise helps a bunch.
     
  20. QingTian

    QingTian Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    2,389
    Likes Received:
    277
    Exactly what did you puke out? Water or food?

    Part of the problem with competing is that you fight at different times from when you normally train. You have to adjust to that. You can't eat breakfast and expect to fight in an hour or two. I generally need 4+ hours, unless I only ate a powerbar or sports drink.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.