Football Dad. Calling all parents of sporting kids.

Discussion in 'Mayberry Lounge' started by Phlog, Sep 21, 2021.

  1. Phlog Dad Belt

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    How do you deal with it? Do you support em like crazy, just let em get on with it, push them at all? How do you not act crazy?

    My seven year old daughter loves pink and unicorns, she is also a natural at sport. She's just turned 7 but wears 8-10 clothes, can swing from one hand, deadlifted over her bodyweight on first try etc etc. She ain't just tall but she's coordinated. Also she has literally the best mentality for high achievement, she's her own worst critic, high level of conscientiousness.

    She played a game today and scored the winning goal, she was instrumental in her teams defences too. She didn't tell me this, when she got into the car she was telling me how she made some good tackles and closed people off but could have done much more. The coach told me, stopped us driving off to wax lyrical about her.

    Usually I try and watch her play, but both her mum and I had work commitments beyond normal today.

    My inclination is to hold back and try and put the brakes on for her a little. She's so hard on herself I reckon she needs wild love and support with no pressure from us. After her first try surfing, a lesson, she cried that she kept falling off, this was after catching every single wave and riding a few right into shore. I had to explain at length that she rode more waves in that hour than I, a surfer had ridden in several months.

    Edit forgot to say, I was not a sporty kid and parents hated sport. I have no playbook.

    Just wondering if anyone has some tips re ones kids in sports, or maybe a story about it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2021
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  2. Zinger Potato Belt

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    When I played rugby in school, dad was too drunk to notice, but mom prayed to God every time I was away at a game or practice session, because she didn't approve of the sport, and thought I'll get killed eventually. Nobody gave a crap and I was on my own.

    But at least the prayers worked, and I'm still here, alive.

    Thanks, mom!

    With my daughters I'll probably be hands off as well. I liked not having my parents eyes constantly looking at everything I do, I got to have fun and enjoyed the game properly without thinking what my parents think about my every move. I felt free.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2021
  3. Otto! Steel Belt Platinum Member

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    Encourage them but let them be kids. Don’t be that parent who takes the fun out of it by taking it too seriously.
     
  4. Herwald Red Belt

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    Just be like the Little Hercules' parents.
     
  5. hohner Titanium Belt

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    If you don't get her on performance enhancers now she'll never amount to anything iirc
     
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  6. bad mojo Purple Belt

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    That's great, man. My 12 yo kid is into football, he's been training for almost 6 years now. I'm glad he enjoys it, I'm there at almost every practice. Many parents are, mostly to enjoy it and have some laughs. Sometimes I give him a piece of advice or something, but nothing too serious. There are some parents who are really serious about it, but I don't think there's a need for it at this stage. If my son is really good and keeps it going even when he's 14 or 15 (that's the age most of the kids fall off), then the parents should take it seriously, also. Having said that, the moment when he scored a winning goal with few moments remaining in the game, a couple of months ago...almost felt like my kid won the World Cup. Guess that's what's being a parent is all about. I bet it felt great when the coach praised your daughter, too. Kids being brought into sports and competition early on is a great thing, regardless of what they chose to do later in life, IMO.
     
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  7. Tone C Gold Belt

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    This.
     
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  8. Cole train Gold Belt

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    I legit think dads go to kids sport events to get drunk

    My dad always had beer in hand lmao
     
  9. Zinger Potato Belt

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    Either that or to check out the mothers.

    What sport did you do?
     
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  10. Violencia Amateur Lover Platinum Member

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    Haha
    Haha!
     
  11. Cole train Gold Belt

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    played 2 seasons of usa football since boxing was on break in summers
     
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  12. Violencia Amateur Lover Platinum Member

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    When my son first starting playing Basketball. My wife tried to get all serious with him. Stopped that real quick. No kid wants that shit.
     
  13. HomeCheese Black Belt

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    Great story and kids sports are so much fun if you let them be. I coached around 30 teams in three different sports with my daughters. Keep your comments positive and encouraging and never dwell on any mistakes. They asked a bunch of college athletes what was the worst part of youth sports. Guess what they said? The ride home in the car when their parents told them all the stuff they did wrong.

    The best thing you can say to your kid after a game: I love watching you play and having fun.

    Remember that just because your kid is good now doesn't mean they will be good at 15. I've seen lots of kids shine at 8-10 and just be average as a teenager. Some kids mature a little earlier. Don't put her identity into the sport as you never know what will happen. Praise her when she is a good teammate and kind to the other kids.

    Most of all enjoy the ride, I had so much fun with my kids and sports. It really was one of the highlights of my adult life. My oldest just graduated university and my youngest is in uni., they already look back and see how sports helps shape them and are very glad for the experience.
     
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  14. rv5869 Yellow Belt

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    Let your daughter have fun!!!!!!!!!
    When she gets older and is still into sports you can SLOWLY ramp up the intensity to the point it helps her excel and not hate the sport.
     
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  15. Thrawn33 JUST BLEED Belt

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    (Former Soccer Dad)
    At that age it's supposed to be fun. Give it a few years, if she's outclassing the whole field then you start looking at harder leagues, but go mid level for a season, see if she's having fun, don't jump to premier level right off the bat.

    When they join the premier level youth clubs, get ready for no off seasons, travel and expenses.

    Then be ready for upper teenage years. That's when they either decide to commit to their sport, or enjoy teenage life.

    My daughter called it quits on soccer her junior year of HS. Then she walked on the varsity team her senior year and murdered bitches. Then stopped.

    She's a conference (D3) champ high jumper in college now and her best friend on her last premier team is still trying to get her to walk on their college team. I think she got burned out and tired of being hurt all the time (multiple concussions and lower body injuries)
     
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  16. HomeCheese Black Belt

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    I totally understand the part about traveling soccer and playing year round. My youngest tried it one year and none of us liked it. I coached her in rec league through freshman year in HS. She joined the HS team as a sophomore and started next three years. She graduated a few years ago and hasn't put on a pair of cleats since.

    It was a really positive experience for us both.
     
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  17. Streeter Silver Belt

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    My son was never into sports he was into shooting and Army shit...... My daughter though ...... she's a varsity cheerleader , runs cross country at same time , and plays lacrosse in the spring. Was all her idea an I just support her and show up.
     
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  18. VulcanNervPinch Gold Belt

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    <{jackyeah}>
     
  19. Phlog Dad Belt

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    Lots of good advice here, thanks!

    I'll keep it all positive and hands off.

    I've been ensuring she gets to try as many things as possible, I don't think specialisation is that useful early on. I've trained her how to teep and how to (American football) tackle but I reckon we'll shy away from anything too contact cos of CTE etc. Won't stop her if she chooses something tho.

    With both my kids I've done what we call a smash hug everyday when they're off to nursery/school, they run full bore into a hug which often almost knocks me over. They know implicitly how to keep their head out of the way. I took em to rugby tots and the girl forgot it was non contact and de cleated a 4yr old boy. His father said he wasn't even mad, it was such a good tackle<{yearp}>
     
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  20. Squintz Silver Belt

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    Soccer dad*
     

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