1. The official Sherdog Store is back! Check it out! » Discuss it here! »

Differences in skill between blue belts

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by jjwvic, Jun 10, 2008.

  1. slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    1,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    People are placing way too much emphasis in tapping others in training. Really, that means nothing: there are far too many variables involved in class, most of which have been mentioned (they were taking it easy, they were working on adding a new technique to their game, they were trying to work you through a move, they've just come back from injury so tapped to stop their bust elbow getting fucked up again, they want to work a specific position, etc).

    Training in class is not about 'winning' or 'losing', its about learning. If you tap someone else, or you get tapped, who cares? Save the win/lose mentality for competition (where you know your opponent is going all out to stop you getting anything), not your training partners (who are trying to help you get better: hopefully you're doing the same for them).

    I'm always linking to this thread, but it bears repeating:

     
  2. Dedicado Machetero

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    969
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    British Columbia, Canada
    yes. Some blues get it easily and quick, others take years to get it. Some blues are excellent others are abysmal. YOu get the blue for knowledge of basic BJJ, not for being a tapout machine nobody can touch. I've been tapping blues for years before I ever got mine. But these weren't the best or even the challangeing ones.
    Still, at our club, you best not be tapping out all the time to a new guy if you want to keep your belt blue, know what I mean?
     
  3. Dedicado Machetero

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    969
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    British Columbia, Canada
    unless e really sucks!
     
  4. Tony Manifold Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,773
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria, BC

    This is a really big point and bears repeating. For example, I am working on my butterfly guard right now, so everything revolves around be getting to butterfly guard. I am butt scooting a lot and sometimes guys will do a torrado (I know I spelled that wrong) guard pass, or just back up and get to their feet and get around me. So in training they are passing my guard but it is a fictional setting. I am a wrestler and judo player more the BJJ guy (at this point) there is no way in hell I am ever butt scooting. But there are maybe 6 people in the gym that could take me down and we almost never start from standing anyway, so I end up butt scooting to work on the techniques I need to work on.

    Personally, when I look for success in rolling, it is in the sense that I finally nail a techinque I am working on, be it a sub, a sweep or escape. If I hit that technique and get tapped later, I still consider it a success in training.
     
  5. Darksky Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    642
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sunny Az
    In regards to Royce and belts hee is my experience.

    Royce gave me my blue belt after I trained for 1 year and won my weight class at the Gracie tournament in 1998 by submitting all six of my opponents. If anything he was very stingy with belts back then, with some guys having to wait 2-3 years. Does he have an actual school now? I think he mainly travels so he probably can only give out belts at the seminars.

    Any who..... been all down hill since 1998, man I miss my white belt.

    <----- takes up Tai Chi
     
  6. DaRuckus337 Black Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2006
    Messages:
    7,029
    Likes Received:
    0
    You can say this all you want, but it won't make it true and it won't change human nature. People often compete hard during live rolls (it depends on the athlete and the circumstance, but it has its place in training). People don't like to get particularly like to get dominated when they are actually competing pretty hard, even if it is by a teammate. People especially don't like to get beat by people of lower rank/skill. It's embarrassing, and a blow to their confidence. And that's only natural.

    I agree with the tone of your post, as well as the 'don't talk about results from the practice room' message, but that doesn't mean that people don't care about what goes down during a live practice roll. We all care. We all want to do well in a competitive roll against a teammate who has a higher rank/skill, and take pride (albeit in silence) when we do secure a catch or dominate the match. We all want to avoid getting caught by a teammate of lower rank/skill, and feel irritated/insecure when we do get caught. It's normal, it's natural, and in my opinion, it's a sign that you actually give a shit about your performance. Keep it to yourself for the most part, don't be a dick in practice or in public about training results, but caring about your performance - even in a practice match - is just fine.
     
  7. slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Messages:
    1,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    Absolutely: I'm speaking of the ideal. Everyone has an ego, and nobody likes to tap. Its when you start making too much of it that it becomes a problem, turning class into a permanent pseudo-competition where people are too scared to try anything new because they're afraid of getting tapped.

    I'll quote my favourite thread (sorry to keep doing that, but I strongly feel it makes a lot of important points people should take on board) again, where Yrkoon9 makes a great post (which basically agrees with what you just said):

     
  8. Tony Manifold Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,773
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Again, I can't really argue the above posts. I am competitive as fuck, I hate to lose. But I try to subject that desire to my desire to learn. The important point is to do the best you can in that regard.

    One thingI liked when I took judo is that we did have the odd mini competition in class. We would play judo tournement style with boundaries, a ref and spectators. It was a great experience for people who have never competed or needed work on competition strategy (which was different then Randori). It also subtly showed the difference between practice and fighting.
     
  9. DaDiazBros** Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,478
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    In Boxxy's shorts!
    Yea it depends. Some just get their blue belts because...Well...They're "qualified for one," due to mat time.

    You have to remember, your jiu jitsu schools are first and foremost a business, the average wait for a blue I think is about a year or so. The academy I go to, you can get it in 6-8 months (if you're extremely dedicated and know all moves)...Maybe even shorter...
     
  10. Jinzumkei Rock El Columbian

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2004
    Messages:
    4,693
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Irvine, CA
    IMO, It's harder to gauge belt level in no-gi grappling tho. I think often times the levels are inflated. For instance, i went to a different school to do some no-gi grappling and they thought I was a purple or brown since I was consistently tapping purples and giving their browns a hard time. But really I'm a a blue belt and it really shows when I put the gi on. No-gi grappling is not a very good metric of how you'll grapple once the gi is on.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.