Defend the Stack and Take the Back

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Gerbiljiujitsu, May 12, 2014.

  1. Gerbiljiujitsu

    Gerbiljiujitsu Purple Belt

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    In this video I show a high percentage way to avoid being stacked and then take the back. This move looks too simple to work, but trust me, rep it out.

    One of the most important things that you have to resist is your opponent clasping their hands around your waist. As you move through the ranks you will find it easier and easier to do. Fighting them off will be a combination of hand fighting and extending your back and legs to push yourself away.

    It's in this time that you take control of the sleeves (which further combats the clasping of their hands together) and put your feet on the hips. Take the time to push with your feet on the hips. Pushing on the hips will open up some space. This will make space for your feet to go into the pocket by their hip while also elongating your opponent's arms so that they lose leverage.

    Once you've made that space you should insert your foot into the space by the hip. When you do this it's very important that you straighten your leg to lock their arm in place (reference the video). This arm trap is VERY effective. If you feel, or your training partner feels, like there is a way to pull their arm back once you've straightened your leg then you're not doing it correctly.

    Now that you've trapped the arm it's time to bring your other leg into the mix. I show in the video that you can either control one side like this, or both sides, but ultimately you're going to load your legs up on one side.

    When you tilt your body it will make a little space for your leg to fit nicely next to your first leg. When you put this leg over the shoulder and under the leg it's time to straighten it just like the first leg.

    PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE be careful when straightening the leg. Depending on how flexible your partner is this can range from tight, to uncomfortable to an actual submission (making the shoulder like it's going to blow up). So while you're figuring out what your opponent's shoulder flexibility is, make sure to take this move slow.

    That top leg is going to be coming right over the top of that shoulder. Once you have the top leg in and straightened you can take out the bottom leg and start to turn towards your partner/opponent's back. The act of turning in will put a lot of pressure, and thus domination, on that arm. Be careful with this transition.

    Keep in mind that you already have one hook in and your opponent is basically flattened out. This will give you the edge in securing the back. I prefer the Seat Belt Grip or the Tight Waist.

    Try it out and let me know what you think.
     
  2. SuperAzn812

    SuperAzn812 Green Belt

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    I gotta give that a shot against those pesky wrestlers.

    That move is pretty slick, thanks.
     
  3. mattemate

    mattemate Brown Belt

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    Weird. Nice.
     
  4. Broken arrow

    Broken arrow Purple Belt

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    Interdasting.... I'm going to try this tomorrow
     
  5. Dirty Holt

    Dirty Holt Black Belt Professional Fighter

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    I have guys try this on me constantly because I stack a lot. When they try this, if you longstep you go immediately to side control and they have a very hard time getting guard back because of the grips. I get very surprised when guys try this move more than once because it is fairly easy to beat with a longstep.
     
  6. Gerbiljiujitsu

    Gerbiljiujitsu Purple Belt

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    I've literally never had anyone long step against me (and I'm a fan of the long step). I wonder if this is measure I make space wish my feet on the hips first. I'm having trouble visualizing the long step having space if you started off by pushing away on the hips.
     
  7. Dirty Holt

    Dirty Holt Black Belt Professional Fighter

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    The further they try to push away, the easier the long step gets. It becomes very, very easy to get by this because all they really have to stop you is one foot.

    Its like a trap that people will somehow not let go of; they want to push you away and get that foot in there so badly, that I will just come in low, take any kind of stack grip (double insides) and let them try it. Once my head goes to the other side, they are going to blow a ton of energy trying to stop the pass because at that point, its all abs and a foot.
     
  8. dimmyfinster

    dimmyfinster Blue Belt

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    At what point are you doing the longstep and to which side? I'm not picturing it either.
     
  9. Zankou

    Zankou Bringing peace and love Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Add me to the list of people who are confused by how you would longstep in that situation. Usually I would worry about the guy going towards my back with a smash type pass, not longstepping to the front.
     
  10. junco

    junco Blue Belt

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    Pause the video at 2:36. The long step looks wide open at this point, no?
     
  11. Zankou

    Zankou Bringing peace and love Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    I think I see what you mean, but I wouldn't ordinarily call that a longstep pass because there's no head control.

    The way Gerbil does this move is a little strange to me because ordinarily you see it done from a belt grip, which makes the pass basically useless. I haven't seen it done the way Gerbil does, where he seems to be using pure shoulder pressure to control his opponent. Usually you drive your elbow into the guy's spine off a belt grip, because that grip is what kills the posture and makes him carry your weight, not arm pressure alone.

    Here is Kurt Osiander, going the OTHER way to get there, and showing the belt grip finish for the back take. I absolutely love this roll-through counter to any stack pass (single or double), it's just pure hilarity. ATOS uses this sequence frequently, particularly Galvao, and it's just nothing but sick.

    [YT]Mh3VhChaGCo[/YT]
     
  12. Dirty Holt

    Dirty Holt Black Belt Professional Fighter

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    Bingo. I am talking about doint a longstep with your near leg. The only thing stopping a longstep is his foot, thats it. He cannot raise his leg as high as I can longstep, and once I am over the foot, its game over. I have a double under grip and control of his hips. He has a farside grip on my sleeve which is useless.

    Once they figure out they have been burned, they will almost 100% of the time try to roll on top/back take, which is absolutely futile because I have a monster gip on their hips from my stack pass.

    I always get confused why guys will try this more than once on me because it is so easy to beat with a long step. Before I figured that out, there was a good amount of pressure on my upper body and it worked fairly well. My coach does it frequently because I stack him frequently and he has long legs. Once I longstepped, all pressure got released and I am sittin in side control with his legs killed.
     
  13. Gerbiljiujitsu

    Gerbiljiujitsu Purple Belt

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    If this is when we're talking about doing a long step I just really have a hard time seeing this being done without blowing out their shoulder.

    Now, with that being said it's never even occurred to me for someone to try this so I could be totally off base here...I just dont see it.
     
  14. Gerbiljiujitsu

    Gerbiljiujitsu Purple Belt

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    +1 for this. This may be why I'm having a hard time envisioning this. The active pressure on the top of the shoulder by straightening the leg (think of a severe cramping in your thigh) is seriously something that a lot of people tap to.
     
  15. Dirty Holt

    Dirty Holt Black Belt Professional Fighter

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    The Kurt Osiander way of doing it is going to work better IMO because it forces their far side arm into an omoplata position where they cannot dominate your hips with their grips.

    The way you do this and many others is a basic wrestling switch, which if someone taps to that, you can hit anything on earth on them. The far side arm remains in a tight grip, which makes it much easier for me to longstep and control.

    Im going to find someone who counters like this and make a video tomorrow if I can. Verbally explaining technique is not my strong point admittedly.
     
  16. pistol3

    pistol3 Orange Belt

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    These attack sequences are just a few of the reasons I've stopped even bothering to attempt to pass with double unders. There are just too many counters.
     
  17. Obscure Terror

    Obscure Terror ................................. Platinum Member

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    Ryan Hall's double under pass style from his passing DVD is superior to the normal way IMO, as his back isn't exposed and he's more postured.

    I've done a similar counter to Gerbil's method and done OK, not tried the Osiander one. Not many guys double under pass at my gym so I don't see it a lot.
     
  18. Gerbiljiujitsu

    Gerbiljiujitsu Purple Belt

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    I appreciate that, it will be super helpful and I'm looking forward to seeing a new counter.
     
  19. junco

    junco Blue Belt

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    Interesting. I stopped using the double-under pass because I felt like it used way too much energy, and was really, really hard to finish on someone good (which maybe says more about my double-under pass technique than the move itself).
     
  20. selfcritical

    selfcritical Brown Belt

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    I've had good success with it. If my opponent has cloth on their ass that I can grab, I don't know why i would bother doing it the clasped hands way.
     

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