Deadlift form question.

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by TheAth-ah-lete, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. TheAth-ah-lete Purple Belt

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    Today I switched things up a bit. The past couple months I haven't done anything less than 6 reps, and today I was doing 5x3. Apparently I had no idea what weight I needed to be using. My priority has been getting stronger, but also improving my muscular endurance by doing 6-10 reps with short rest periods and putting big excercises together, meaning I deadlift right after I squat.

    Anyways squatting triples was a lot easier than I expected. 265 wasn't a problem until the last set, which seemed odd since I got pretty worn out by doing 4x6 with 205. I even felt like I could have done a lot more but I had to deadlift right afterwards...which brings me around to my point.

    I figured I would throw 265 on the deadlifts too and see how that felt and during my first set I felt some pain in my upper back. Rested 60 seconds and during the rest I decided I needed to widen my stance a little so that I could get my butt lower to the ground. That seemed to help a lot but I am having a little pain now. I was wondering if from this info someone might be able to offer some advice. Does upper back pain indicate that I am rounding my back and not getting my butt under me enough? Is widening my stance a little and getting lower the fix? As well obviously as making sure my spine is neutral throughout the movement.
     
  2. B3rserk3R Brown Belt

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    Without a vid it's a little tough to tell. What I'd do is this. Clearly your comfortable with your form for when you use for 6 reps. So start with just a touch more than that. Then pull triples and add weight until you get to that point where it's hard but your form is still good. Start with this weight next workout (or pull a few more sets at this weight if you find it relatively quick).
     
  3. Miracle Man White Belt

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    By how much did you widen your stance? Also where is it hurting? At your traps or lower on your back?
     
  4. TheAth-ah-lete Purple Belt

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    Yeah, I'm pretty sure the first set I just wasn't used to the heavier weight as it was a lot easier to concentrate on form with less weight.

    Anyways, earlier in the day I had also seen a vid of a guy deadlifting with what looked to me a very narrow stance and thought I would try it so on the first set that caused the pain my feet were just about an inch closer to the middle on each side, after the first set I went back to my normal stance.

    In fact, now that I think about it, the video I had watched before was not one with great technique. The guy's back was rounding a bit, but he was lifting some SERIOUS weight. I didn't correlate his closer stance with his rounded back, but that's what I seemed to find during my workout. Can someone comment on this idea?

    p.s. It was not quite in my traps...a little lower than that, but definitely my upper back rather than lower.
     
  5. Miracle Man White Belt

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    Well it is a bit individual in terms of technique. What works for me may not work for you. Over the past couple of months i've been learning to deadlift with a rounded upper back. Not lower. Think dropping your shoulders forward. With this i've hit plenty of pr's and usually feel better the next day.

    Depending on how long your arms are you may have to sink your hips lower. Make sure they dont fly up before the weights off the ground. Focus on pushing through your heels like your trying to sink them into the ground.
     

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