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Cracking/Popping In Joints While Doing Push-Ups??

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by CQ, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. CQ

    CQ White Belt

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    When doing pushups of any kind really, I notice my joints primarilly in the elbow, make a low popping/cracking sound. I don't feel any pain from the popping?cracking, but Id just like to get some advice on what y'all think it might be

    Thanks
     
  2. Mooney

    Mooney Blue Belt

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    Generally with popping joints, if theres no pain, theres no problem.
    I constantly get them in my hips
     
  3. DR evil

    DR evil Orange Belt

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    I get the same thing in my chest and shoulders. my doctor says it's no big deal if it doesn't cause pain.
     
  4. miaou

    miaou barely keeping it together

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    Shoulder popping might very well be due to improper humeral head movement, caused by improper function of the rotator cuff and/or improper postural alignment.

    If you doctor is an orthopedist or sports doctor you trust and he reached that conclusion after proper clinical assessment of your shoulder condition, then I definitely wouldn't assume to know more than he does.
     
  5. Klotz

    Klotz Shalom

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    No big deal. It's basically like cracking your knuckles.
     
  6. kicker

    kicker Orange Belt

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    Did you try warming up first?
     
  7. will kwon

    will kwon Banned Banned

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    Fucking man up and do your pushups :icon_lol:
     
  8. will kwon

    will kwon Banned Banned

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    jk just take some glucosamine i think it's meant to relieve joint pain
     
  9. CQ

    CQ White Belt

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    Okay thanks for the input! Yes I do make sure to warm up before anything and the cracking hasn't kept me fromm my workouts. Just a question I've been really curious about.
     
  10. Gorgenflex

    Gorgenflex White Belt

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    I get that in my knees when I do squats and i always get a bit concerned/annoyed but theres never pain so I just continue.
     
  11. wildman1717

    wildman1717 Green Belt

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    My knees pop something terrible also, no pain though.
     
  12. Indivdude

    Indivdude Blue Belt

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    The general consensus is that popping with no pain = no problem but popping with pain issues. Not sure if it matters how much pain but I imagine so. Pain, however slight, is usually not a good thing in your joints.
     
  13. Bennayboi

    Bennayboi Yellow Belt

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    Anyone got the science behind popping? When i first started strength training my back popped intensely for a few months every time i warmed up and stretched. My posture has improved significantly so i cant help but think my back was realigning. The popping since has subsided for the most part.
     
  14. Mooney

    Mooney Blue Belt

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    from wikipedia:
     
  15. CQ

    CQ White Belt

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    Thanks for the find Mooney !
     
  16. JRT6

    JRT6 Black Belt

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    Rice crispies in shoulder, elbows, knees and hips? (I got in all those places and yes it worries me) This is the reality:

    Chondromalacia patellae
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    Chondromalacia patella
    Classification and external resources
    ICD-10 M22.4
    ICD-9 717.7
    DiseasesDB 2595
    MedlinePlus 000452
    MeSH D046789
    Chondromalacia patellae (also known as CMP, Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome and Runner's Knee) is a term that goes back eighty years. It originally meant "soft cartilage under the knee cap," a presumed cause of pain at the front of the knee. This condition often affects young, otherwise healthy athletes.[1][2]

    Chondromalacia is due to an irritation of the undersurface of the kneecap. The undersurface of the kneecap, or patella, is covered with a layer of smooth cartilage. This cartilage normally glides effortlessly across the knee during bending of the joint. However, in some individuals, the kneecap tends to rub against one side of the knee joint, and the cartilage surface become irritated, and knee pain is the result.[3]

    The term "chondromalacia" sometimes is used to describe abnormal-appearing cartilage anywhere in the body.[4] For example, a radiologist might note chondromalacia on an MRI of an ankle.

    Pain at the front of the knee is common in young adults, especially soccer players, Gymnasts, cyclists, rowers, tennis players, ballet dancers, horseback riders, volleyball players, and runners. Snowboarders and skateboarders are prone to this injury, particularly those specializing in jumps where the knees are under great stress. Skateboarders most commonly receive this injury in their non-dominant foot due to the constant kicking and twisting that is required of it during skateboarding.[5]

    The condition may result from acute injury to the patella or from chronic friction between the patella and the groove in the femur through which it passes during motion of the knee.[6] Possible causes include a tight iliotibial band, neuromas, bursitis, overuse, malalignment, core instability, and patellar maltracking.

    Pain at the front of the knee due to overuse can be addressed with a basic program consisting of RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation), anti-inflammatory medications, and physiotherapy.[5][7]

    In short everyone who trains is at some point going to have to deal with it. Those that don't get brand new joints that despite all the medical hype really aren't kewl.
     
  17. Mooney

    Mooney Blue Belt

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    but this is just when theres pain involved...... right?
     
  18. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

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    If you have Chondromalacia patellae there's pain and swelling. I had issues with it back in high school from too much running with low quality running shoes.
     
  19. miaou

    miaou barely keeping it together

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    For clarity purposes, let it be noted that the article you quoted refers specifically to joint cracking/clicking, not to joint popping around. The entire article can be found here: Cracking joints - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.



    Not necessarily.
     
  20. Mooney

    Mooney Blue Belt

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    yeah i probably should have clarified that, i presumed by "cracking/popping" in the title thats what the TS means, as apposed to the joint actually popping out of place.
     

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