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Buring Fat: Aerobic Vs. Anaerobic Workouts

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Jimmy Cerra, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. Jimmy Cerra

    Jimmy Cerra Amateur Fighter

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    I was reading this article on Cyclical Ketogenic Diets. Is it mostly accurate? If so, when it says:
    Does that mean that if you want to burn more fat, you should do more long-distance low intensity aerobic workouts instead of HIIT and anaerobic workouts?

    I need to lose 5 pounds in a week, and I was planning on doing an extra HIIT workout (actually, burpees) every day to do it. Is that a good idea?

    P.S. Can this go into the sticky faq? I saw lots of simular threads (but nothing on exactly these issues, so I posted yet another one).
     
  2. marine

    marine Yellow Belt

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    i don't know i would think you would burn more fat by doing things like HIIT and tabata and other stuff, but alot of people say get like a 20 min cardio going then after that do HIIT
     
  3. eljamaiquino

    eljamaiquino Blue Belt

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    http://www.ast-ss.com/dev/qa_search/full_text.asp?ID=2800

    Q: As the body uses fat exclusively as a fuel source during low intensity exercise, I fail to understand why you recommend high intensity aerobic exercise to burn body fat?

    A: Many folks think that low intensity cardio (aerobic) exercise is the best way to burn off unwanted body fat and get lean. It
     
  4. eljamaiquino

    eljamaiquino Blue Belt

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    http://www.cbass.com/FATBURN.HTM

    What About Fat Loss?

    Angelo Tremblay, Ph.D., and his colleagues at the Physical Activities Sciences Laboratory, Laval University, Quebec, Canada, challenged the common belief among health professionals that low-intensity, long-duration exercise is the best program for fat loss. They compared the impact of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and high-intensity aerobics on fat loss. (Metabolism (1994) Volume 43, pp.814-818)

    The Canadian scientists divided 27 inactive, healthy, non-obese adults (13 men, 14 women, 18 to 32 years old) into two groups. They subjected one group to a 20-week endurance training (ET) program of uninterrupted cycling 4 or 5 times a week for 30 to 45 minutes; the intensity level began at 60% of heart rate reserve and progressed to 85%. (For a 30-year-old, this would mean starting at a heart rate of about 136 and progressing to roughly 170 bpm, which is more intense than usually prescribed for weight or fat loss.)

    The other group did a 15-week program including mainly high-intensity-interval training (HIIT). Much like the ET group, they began with 30-minute sessions of continuous exercise at 70% of maximum heart rate reserve (remember, they were not accustomed to exercise), but soon progressed to 10 to 15 bouts of short (15 seconds progressing to 30 seconds) or 4 to 5 long (60 seconds progressing to 90 seconds) intervals separated by recovery periods allowing heart rate to return to 120-130 beats per minute. The intensity of the short intervals was initially fixed at 60% of the maximal work output in 10 seconds, and that of the long bouts corresponded to 70% of the individual maximum work output in 90 seconds. Intensity on both was increased 5% every three weeks.

    As you might expect, the total energy cost of the ET program was substantially greater than the HIIT program. The researchers calculated that the ET group burned more than twice as many calories while exercising than the HIIT program. But (surprise, surprise) skinfold measurements showed that the HIIT group lost more subcutaneous fat. "Moreover," reported the researchers, "when the difference in the total energy cost of the program was taken into account..., the subcutaneous fat loss was ninefold greater in the HIIT program than in the ET program." In short, the HIIT group got 9 times more fat-loss benefit for every calorie burned exercising.

    How can that be?

    Dr. Tremblay's group took muscle biopsies and measured muscle enzyme activity to determine why high-intensity exercise produced so much more fat loss. I'll spare you the details (they are technical and hard to decipher), but this is their bottom line: "[Metabolic adaptations resulting from HIIT] may lead to a better lipid utilization in the postexercise state and thus contribute to a greater energy and lipid deficit." In other words, compared to moderate-intensity endurance exercise, high- intensity intermittent exercise causes more calories and fat to be burned following the workout. Citing animal studies, they also said it may be that appetite is suppressed more following intense intervals. (Neither group was placed on a diet.)

    The next time someone pipes up about the fat-burn zone, ask them if they are familiar with the Tabata and Tremblay research reports.

    [You'll find high-intensity aerobic workouts for bodybuilding in Ripped 3 and for balanced fitness, strength and endurance, in Lean For Life; both books are in the products section of this site. Routines specifically applying Tabata-type intervals are explained in chapter 5 of Challenge Yourself. Keep in mind that VO2max can only be measured in the laboratory; you'll have to estimate 170% of VO2 max. Don't try to make it too complicated. Simply chose a pace that brings you near exhaustion on the final 20-second rep; you should become more fatigued with each rep. Increase the pace as your condition improves. It's always better to underestimate your ability at the start. Begin a little slower than you think you can handle, and then adjust the pace from workout to workout. Don't attempt high-intensity intervals unless you are in good condition; they're not appropriate for beginners. Note the medical warning which follows.]

    Warning

    The Tremblay group and Dr. Tabata, in his e-mail response to Richard Winett, emphasize this warning: "High-intensity exercise cannot be prescribed for individuals at risk for health problems or for obese people who are not used to exercise."
     
  5. marine

    marine Yellow Belt

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    sweet good read man thanks for the information
     
  6. Duncon76

    Duncon76 Blue Belt

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    To burn the most fat one should do more HIT. Long distance will burn more protein, stripping your muscle as energy, not good.
     
  7. marine

    marine Yellow Belt

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    aight this is what i do

    i do a couple of min's of jump roping to warm up then i go straight and start doing tabata.
     
  8. Jimmy Cerra

    Jimmy Cerra Amateur Fighter

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    Excellent info. Thanks!
     
  9. paulchu

    paulchu Guest

    Losing 5 lbs in a week? That is not a good thing to do. The only and best way to do that (without surgery) is to lose as much water weight as you can.
     
  10. Jimmy Cerra

    Jimmy Cerra Amateur Fighter

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    I know. It is my own damn fault; usually I attempt losing weight weeks beforehand. November was not a good month for me....
     

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