bjj training styles

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by ozyabbas, Mar 25, 2008.

  1. ozyabbas

    ozyabbas Purple Belt

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    I was wondering what other bjj organisation phylosophies are like. How would you compare alliance bjj to gracie barra, carlsons schools, gracie jiu jitsu, machado jiu jitsu etc

    All in terms of how hard they sparr, what they think of sport bjj, what they think of bjj self defence etc
     
  2. Big Eck

    Big Eck On the mat

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    I train at an RGDA school. We do a ton of ground technique and our school is focused 100% on sport jiu jitsu with some self defense thrown in.

    The advanced classes are almost 100% sport jiu jitsu. We train primarily ground techniques, a lot of open guard and closed guard. We are most definitely a guard school.

    The beginner classes do more self defense and focus mostly on positioning. Whenever there is a person trying their first class, our instructor always shows some self defense techniques to demonstrate the effectiveness of jiu jitsu to them.

    Whenever there's a big comp coming up (Naga in Newark in a couple of weeks for example) we do a good amount of stand up involving both throws and shots to the legs.

    Cliff notes:
    RGDA
    Guard focused school
    Mostly focused on sport jiu jitsu.
     
  3. ozyabbas

    ozyabbas Purple Belt

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    I used to train at an RGDA gym in London before I came to Korea, the instructors name is Eddie Kone. There was a little self defense but not much. It was very traditional gracie jiu jitsu, with very few new guards such as x guard etc. They didn't do any standup sparring. Just about everybody had a style that was personalised to them, some exclusively liking working from the guard while others prefering the top game. Very few standing passes and was all very technical.

    The next place I trained at was at a Gracie Barra run by a black belt called Mark Walder. I didn't train there for long because I had to go to Korea. It seemed like a good school, it had a good vibe and the other students seemed quite talented. They would teach only 2 techniques per class but drill them alot. The sparring was at about 80% intensity, everybody was very nice and didn't go too rough. They also didn't seem to like passing, or using new bjj innovations.

    The next place I trained at was in Korea. Its where I have had the most fun and where I have felt the most comraderie. The main instructor was an American who got his black belt from a Gracie Barra guy from Boston but can't remember his name. The students are all very talented, very fast, flexible and technical. They use alot of new bjj innovations along with fundamental stuff. Many non-Koreans (usually Americans or Canadians) bring their BJJ experience from their respective cultures so its a real melting pot.

    Well thats been my BJJ journey so far.
     
  4. Big Eck

    Big Eck On the mat

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    x2.
     
  5. J Storm**

    J Storm** Banned Banned

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    Roberto Maia?
     
  6. blanko

    blanko Guest

    bingo
     

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