Best escape from crucifix position?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by ultmma, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. ultmma Orange Belt

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    Here is a question I haven't heard answered regarding the Kimbo v.s Thompson..... before you flame me, remember B.J Penn was caught in a similar position against Matt Hughes


    This is obviously one of the worst position to be in....so whats the counter escape to being in this defenseless position?

    what could of Kimbo done to get out of there and what could of B.J done stuck in the middlle of the cage with no where to go?


    Thanks for your grappling help
     
  2. Czyivn Yellow Belt

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    Against matt hughes. realistically, there isn't really a way out. You just tuck your head and hope you don't take too much damage and wait for him to get bored. Against other people, you can bridge them hard to get them going towards your head. That won't get them off, but sometimes they over-correct back towards your feet and you sit up as they are doing that. If you're near the cage, you can also walk your feet up it.
     
  3. IrishBeatDown**** Banned Banned

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    i have found that there are four useful escapes from this position.

    #1 tap out
    #2 ref stoppage
    #3 knockout
    #4 saved by the bell
     
  4. ultmma Orange Belt

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    Thanks man. i wish the fight commentators would explain that.
     
  5. Kryos Blue Belt

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    Good question. I don't see this used to much, which is surprising, since it is easier normally to achieve side control than full mount.
     
  6. Sean-Roberts Blue Belt

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    that a pretty messed position
     
  7. txfighter13 Purple Belt

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    It is very difficult position to deal with. The traditional position that is being discusses is one that you have thread the through one of the arms, so that you are no longer in the position. It is very hard to do, I would suggest avoiding that position at all costs.
     
  8. Kryos Blue Belt

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    Does anyone remember how Nate Diaz escaped? I believe he was caught in one against "Batman". I remember he took most of the damage from the fight when in that position.
     
  9. kenban judan orange belt, i think

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    if we're talking mma rules, i am bucking a little to make sure my hips are loose, then kneeing ribs like a motherfucker
     
  10. Griffo Orange Belt

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    Mega bump here... just watching the same Kimbo v Thompson fight on MMA Blitz, how do you break this?
     
  11. Glass6060 White Belt

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    You stay disciplined with the inside arm and don't let him trap it - problem solved.
     
  12. Ergo Orange Belt

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    Best way out? Tapping furiously. Getting caught in a tight crucifix in MMA is very difficult to escape if the guy is intent on staying there. You're going to be eating a few punches to put it mildly.
     
  13. a dead stick Orange Belt

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    If you are talking the mounted crucifix big country style, you absolutely need to get the far side underhook with your free hand, then, bridge hard, usually 2 bumps works, once to get him over your head, the second the get him off, with the second bump you need to do more of an oompa over your shoulder towards the free arm(towards your opponents head) and you should hopefully end up in a weird north south position with both of you one your side, from there scramble like mad to get away, or if you are lucky, and he keeps your arm trapped in between his legs you can reverse into side control.

    If you can't get the far side underhook, you are fucked.

    If you are talking a crucifix from the back i dunno....
     
  14. teamcarvalho Green Belt

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    The way I show to get out is as follows:

    1. Curl you arms towards your head

    2. Pull him close to your face and off of your chest as much as possible

    3. Turn you head to the left or to the right to avoid hurting you neck.

    4. Try to sit up so he will lean forward....this will transfer his wait forward

    5. Immediately shoot your legs straight in the air (You should be on your shoulders and your feet together almost like a head stand)

    6. Now simply drop your legs over your head and land on your toes.....now you should end up in cross body position. The weight of your legs will help you roll him off of you.

    The secret is to use the weight of you legs to roll him off of you......you have to keep the legs straight and together. Also when you shoot your leg in the air you have use your hips with power and speed.
     
  15. Luther Green Belt

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    nice description from teamcarvalho.
     

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