Beginner Muay Thai training.

Discussion in 'Muay Thai and Kickboxing' started by sark9guy, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. sark9guy

    sark9guy White Belt

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    Good day all,

    I've been interested in Judo, and considering Muay Thai training too. I am in the New England area (RI/MA) and I figure this will help get me in shape, provide me different a couple of days a week besides the 2-3 days of Judo, and will give me the striking component Judo lacks. With that being said, I figure I will pick your brain a little bit for you vets of the art. Can you help me out with the following questions?

    How long does it take to get some of the basic fundamentals down?

    Is sparing a part of most programs?

    Do injuries "plague" those in training as often as some of the other arts (obviously competition may yield some injuries)?

    Are there a lot of competition options for armatures; and how long before someone has the initial skill set to compete and not get the hell beat out them (pun intended)?

    Thanks for all your impute folks.
     
  2. tasticles

    tasticles Red Belt

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    I know very little muay thai, pretty much what the army trained me and a few mma classes but I have a very strong Judo background. Randori or sparring is a huge part of it. Yeah injuries are very common in both. Depends on the state you're in for competition chances for either sport. And as far as not getting your ass beat it greatly depends on your dedication as well as skill set. It just varies but i'd say about 6 months. Its not the same for everyone. I'm talking hard training and not skipping a beat on classes.

    oh my knees are fucked from doing judo and most judoka have knee problems. A lot of it can be prevented though. A quality instructor that is more technique oriented and just good use of fundamentals helps a lot. Competitions are dangerous period. Most injuries i've received were in training in any combat sport i've done to include boxing.
     
  3. Malik111

    Malik111 Blue Belt

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    I would say 6 months to get the simple basics

    Normaly they shouldnt let you sparr before a few months of practice.

    I have never seen anyone besides me getting a bad injury :) while training/sparring

    I've seen guys have their first amateur fight after like 6 weeks of training and every good trainer should be able to get you some amateur fights, mosty against "rival gyms"

    (Im talking only about muay thai )
     
  4. tasticles

    tasticles Red Belt

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    I could go on for pages about Judo. I had plenty of judo matches and I am a competent boxer with a few fights under my belt but nothing special. I've done a lot of submission grappling, and i had one unsanctioned mma fight against an over matched TKD stylist. That is the extent of my fight experience. I'm sure there are plenty of guys with more experience than me on here that can help you out. Judo is my bread and butter.
     
  5. Jarvan

    Jarvan Brown Belt

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    privates are the best way to learn effectively

    you can spar after one week, granted you are sparring an experienced Kru
     
  6. sark9guy

    sark9guy White Belt

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    Thanks folks - I appreciate all the impute.
     
  7. sark9guy

    sark9guy White Belt

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    How are injuries related to Judo, you ever get any? Thanks.
     
  8. tasticles

    tasticles Red Belt

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    Yeah theres a lot of things that can cause injuries and i have had a couple. They teach you how to break fall early on. In fact it is the first thing. A lot of new guys are afraid of being thrown and don't go with it and cause both of you to get hurt. His resistance may cause him to land on your knee, head etc or even mess up your back if they are heavy enough . There is a lot of twisting motions in Judo for setting up the throws. While unlikely to get hurt in the dojo, theres a decent chance in a match of twisting your knee or tearing a ligament. Sometimes guys get concussions from being dropped on their head. I know how to fall properly and this one asshole went out of his way to slam me on my hand and hold me in such a way break falling didnt help much. I was in the dojo working in someones guard and I got hit with an elbow that cracked my nose. I think he was sloppy reaching for a kimura or my gi. A lot of dudes use all knees in their throws and that is horrible for them. If you were too be a lifelong judo you will have a lot of issues. Doing thousands of throws your joints just wear out. Hip, knee, back etc. Oh and tape your fingers. Practice judo in a controlled environment and make sure you've got guys that know what they are doing and how hard to go and you will probably be fine. I broke a finger and my nose once but nothing too serious in the dojo. Good luck in your training.
     
  9. sark9guy

    sark9guy White Belt

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    Thanks - I appreciate it. I will look out for your suggestions.
     
  10. andy b

    andy b White Belt

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    It all depends on the individual but with a decent instructor and regular training you should have a good grasp by 6 months, however it takes years of dedication to master.

    Sparring should always be optional and no can force you to do it, however to reach a certain level it does become essential, the best way to spar is just to play around "thai style" as this is the best way to learn, if your sparring partner tries to go hard then simply tell thrm to calm down, if they still persist then simply refuse to spar them, you won't learn anything by bashing each other up,

    Injuries are commomplace in any sport, but arent too frequent from just training, make sure you do plenty of stretching as this is often quite overlooked.

    Competition all depends on the area you're in, in england we have gym shows for amateur fighters I believe in the states you guys have "smokers" you can usually compete in these after between 3-6 months of training and are a good first taste of competition.

    muay thai has changed my life in so many ways, so I would urge anyone thinking about taking it up to go for it, its thr most effectice and challenging stand up art around in my opionion.

    hope this all helps.

    Andy
     
  11. sark9guy

    sark9guy White Belt

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    Thanks Andy!
     
  12. ForeverFiending

    ForeverFiending Blue Belt

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    I live in the same area and can help you out. Check you inbox :icon_chee
     

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