Armbar from mount

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by georgwilhelm**, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. georgwilhelm**

    georgwilhelm** Banned Banned

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    I never get it. I am in high mount and whenever I go for the armbar (because it's there) I will lose the arm somehow. Do you guys know some tips or videos where the intricacies are explained properly? And which leg do you put up - the one on the side of the arm you are grabbing or the other one?
     
  2. Funkoar

    Funkoar Green Belt

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    I always go to S-mount right before I take the arm. I find it easier that way.
     
  3. Nozza

    Nozza Purple Belt

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    Is there a difference between s-mount and technical mount?
     
  4. Funkoar

    Funkoar Green Belt

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    Not 100% sure, but I think they are on their side for technical mount.
     
  5. Einarr

    Einarr Banned Banned

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    Are you squeezing your knees? I'd say that's why most people slip out of armbars.

    I mostly get armbars from S-mount too. In Technical Mount your foot closest to their legs is planted on the mat and they're usually on their side, whereas in S-Mount it's sort of like your half crossing your legs and they're usually flat on their back.
     
  6. Funkoar

    Funkoar Green Belt

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    Not sure how old TS is, but a lot of older guys I see struggle with this move. Adding to what Einarr said, sometimes I see the older people sit down or throw the leg over the head awkwardly and there is just too much space for the arm and they lose it.

    It could be any number of things though, like foot placement to not sitting far enough in.

    This is why I prefer S-mount, everything is kept tight and you are sitting already.
     
  7. BJ@LW&WW

    [email protected]&WW Gold Belt

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    so are you losing the armbar in transition or are you actually getting to the armbar and then losing it?

    Not sure how experienced you are or not, but when I see some newer guys try the armbar from mount, they basically just get high mount and start moving their legs like you might to go for the arm. They never get the armbar like that because they really haven't isolated the arm. For me, an ideal situation is to get their arm crossed to the other side before I commit to the armbar. Sometimes I set this up with an americana, and when they defend I pull the arm across because they usually pull it in that direction for me anyway.
     
  8. ManFurrB

    ManFurrB White Belt

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    The key is keeping your hips close to their shoulder, under the arm. This is will prevent the elbow from being able to slip to the ground. This is what makes the S-mount such a key as the other posters have mentioned. You need to try to get the foot your posting(opposite of the arm your attacking), from being posted to inverted. Your foot should end up by their head with your knee facing towards their legs. Coupled with hip pressure pushing in to their shoulder from the other side then a nice solid step-over. Legs pinched together tight, feet hard to the floor and hips close to the shoulder. Funny thing about arm locks is that they are all about controlling with your legs.
     
  9. Dannotheman

    Dannotheman Green Belt

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    Armbar from mount is definitely my most caught sub anymore. I still catch my main training partner all the time, even though as soon as I get to mount he know's what's coming.

    My favorite instructional, so many good details.

     
  10. AllKnowing

    AllKnowing Knowledge is love and light and vision

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    I like establishing the kimura grip from top and then swinging into the arm bar. Especially if my opponent is trying to escape mount by turning on their side.
     
  11. Kozbot

    Kozbot Purple Belt

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    great stuff. definitely going to work on the set up details.
     
  12. fizbo

    fizbo Orange Belt

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    Shawn looks very vulnerable to Blue turning his hips a bit to his left and using his left hand to push Shawn's right leg into half guard as he brings it up, starting around here:

    [​IMG]

    On of my regular training partners in particular is really good at that. I usually keep my right foot tight down at Blue's hip, then let go of the head/collar grip with my right hand and use it to pull Blue's left arm to me cupping the back of the elbow, and only then bring my right leg up to the s-mount.
     
  13. fry_ed

    fry_ed Yellow Belt

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    What do you mean "it's there" ?
    Are they bridging and leaving their arm in the air?
    If so, grab their arm, go belly-down, with your body turned toward their legs. Finish.

    The armbar from S-mount that everyone is talking about is a slow, methodical, attack, and is not opportunistic like your original post suggests.
     
  14. Nozza

    Nozza Purple Belt

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    Surely he's gonna have to do that pretty fast because as soon as he takes his left hand off defence duty you don't need the rest of the slow set up, you can just roll back taking the undefended arm?
     
  15. Technogrunt

    Technogrunt White Belt

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    Go for the americana, keep the figure four. Lift them up a little and bring your knee up to their head.. Now s the other leg... Lean towards their hips and bring over the other leg... Come down unraveling their arm and squeezeing your knees.. Thumb up and hip up...
     
  16. Ice 9 Cobra

    Ice 9 Cobra Black Belt

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    You can stuff the leg with your elbow without letting go of the gable grip
     
  17. Spoonman7

    Spoonman7 Red Belt

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    I use the key lock grip all of the time. The key is to maintain tight pressure so that the person on bottom has trouble escaping and dealing with the pressure.
     
  18. Mooner

    Mooner Banned Banned

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    Why not just go for arm triangles?
     
  19. fizbo

    fizbo Orange Belt

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    Yea, sorry, I didn't describe it well. I guess he pushes with his elbow while doing sort of a sidecrunch and grabbing my left leg between his thighs.
     
  20. Jits420

    Jits420 Yellow Belt

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    One word: LUGWRENCH
    This is for more advanced players but it is far more dangerous and almost impossible to defend..

    But, I usually try to bait another move so to hide the coming arm bar or get their arm exposed.

    Arm triangles, regular triangle setup, kimura, and americanas can expose their arms and make the arm bar more available.
     

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