acl surgery

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by seiko, Mar 29, 2008.

  1. seiko

    seiko White Belt

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    Hi,

    I'm getting acl reconstruction surgery in a month or so. I tore it about 8+ months back. I'm worried about being able to do normal stuff again post surgery.

    Based on your experience, how long before I can normally function (walk, lift) again, as i either use public transport or drive a manual (but that doesnt matter, because its my right knee thats going to get worked on, so no driving). Also, i'm going to get an autograft from a hamstring tendon. Based on what i read, they are going to get 2 hamstring tendons and use that to reaplce the acl. What is the purpose of the hamstring tendon, and would removing this affect hamstring strength, specifically deadlifts?
     
  2. NutFlea

    NutFlea Banned Banned

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    My ACL replacement surgery was about 7 years ago. They used the patellar tendon, though. I was back in the gym 4 months later, but didn't really push things until about 8 months after.
     
  3. Klotz

    Klotz Shalom

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    Best to ask your doc.
     
  4. RollinDownRodeo

    RollinDownRodeo Blue Belt

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    I had ACL surgery about three and a half years ago and they used my hamstring as well. I went with the doc's advice to use the hamstring but he told me that would be the least uncomfortable to rehab from. I told the doc that I wanted to get it repaired so I could continue to lift, play basketball (which is how I tore it), and snowboard. I was walking without crutches and driving after about two to three weeks. I went to physical therapy three times a week, 2 hours a night for about 8 or 9 months before I was completely "back to normal" though I started back lifting only after about 2 months or so after the surgery. Lifting was pretty much all upper body exercises. I probably wasn't squatting or dl'ing until a year later but I can squat and dl heavy now without any pain. My right hamstring does in fact feel a bit weaker than my left though it really hasn't affected me all too much. My vertical leap is back to about where it had been before the injury.

    I recommend trying to get some flexibility back ASAP with the exercises that I'm sure your doc will tell you about. After that, be diligent about going to PT and you'll be good as new. Good luck and enjoy those painkillers.
     
  5. Donut62

    Donut62 Black Belt

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    If you or your insurance company is going to be paying a doctor and hospital 10,000 some dollars for knee reconstruction, you should probably get your money's worth and get his opinion on all of this stuff. Every case is different so individual experience may vary greatly.
     
  6. seiko

    seiko White Belt

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    thanks guys,

    this is crap, about the not squatting and deadlifting part until about a year.

    From the country where i'm in, this procedure costs $3-4k not including rehab costs, so it is not cheap, but not as expensive as in the US. According the the dr., the procedure will be done arthroscopically so healing time is faster, and hamstring tendon will be used for the autograft.

    I guess i'll just work harder on the rehab to get back faster.

    One more thing, how is the spinal anesthecia (sp?) administered? lol. I'm not afraid of needles or anything, but i dont really like the idea of sticking something in my spine
     
  7. Mumrik

    Mumrik Silver Belt

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    I'll be watching this only curiously. Someone I know had the surgery late last year (used the patella) and I've been trying to contribute a bit to the rehab (going slowly). Haven't been able to find any really good material on lifting as rehab as I had hoped.
     
  8. Jim J

    Jim J Purple Belt

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    You need to have a better attitude about the whole thing. You're just going to frustrate yourself if you're worried about getting back to heavy lifting as soon as possible. Concentrate on your rehab. It is a slow tedious process, but you will get back to full strength eventually.

    Don't rush back into high risk sports. Just because you have rehabbed and regained your strength, the bone and graft need to fully fuse, and that takes time. No amount of rehab will rush that along.

    Just take it day by day. Good luck.
     
  9. SMillard

    SMillard Red Belt

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    I had my acl replaced one month ago (Feb. 28). Mine was an allograph (donor ligament) the doctor's reason was because of my age 38. It is standard to only harvest from people younger than 30, so for that reason he figured it would be an upgrade (doctors opinion and words, not mine). I also had torn meniscus (which you might/probably will have as well) and I had a crack in the cartilage so I was immobile in the big brace and using crutches for three weeks. I am now walking without crutches and using a "functional brace".

    What Jim J said is very true, you will need to learn that the progress will be gradual. If you had more time I'd say you should work out as much as possible before the surgery. I did and I think it helped me tremendously. My leg extends to normal now and I can flex it to the normal pre-surgery range already. Also my strength has come back as good or better than others going through the rehab, I think there are six other people going through it right now and it is almost like a competition to see who can do the best. As Jim J said, you need to let the graft and bone heal, no amount of rehab will speed that up. I'm sure you know from the doctor telling you, they are drilling a hole through the two bones in your leg and attaching the ligament with screws that alone can take about four months to be fully attached then the ligament needs to acclimate to your system and in your case it's new function.

    Your leg will atrophy, you will be shocked how much size you will lose after just four days. It will suck especially the bigger and stronger your legs are, the more extreme it will get. On the bright side it will recover faster if you train.

    When people talk about 8 to 10 months it seems like an eternity, but after you are in the process the time starts to blur and it makes sense. Or at least it did to me. Don't focus on the end result or you will just get depressed and have a pissy attitude. Even I have had some moments but I work through them.

    Good luck, feel free to ask if you have any other questions
     
  10. ggtop

    ggtop White Belt

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    I tore my ACL 3 seconds into a fight. You cant imagine the pain then having to continue fighing! Needless to say I lost the fight, especially since I could not hold any position with the torn knee. I was worried that I was going to damage it even more by continue to fight. I had to tap out (10) second before the round was up.

    I took (2) months and began reading about ACL surgeries. I leaned toward a autograph Patella, with the good knee as a donor. This is what the doctor recommended. He wanted a good knee from the ACL receiving knee so I did bike, and other exercises to get it working the best it could with no ACL.

    I flew from SC to Texas to get this done. Sports Injuries, Motocross Injuries | Orthopedic Surgeon
    He said I would walk out of the hospital. He was right.

    Intensive therapy day (1). Bending the knee (cannonball) every hour (10) times after the surgery while on a zillion percoset. Then ICE, repeat all night long.

    It's now day (3) and I'm walking down to get some breakfest. It's extremely painful but great for the athelete who wants to be back in 3 months training the way he was. The guy is cool and allows you to call his cell phone anytime. You don't see that much.

    I've got 2 more days intensive therapy and I fly home.
    I'm really glad I did this,instead of lipping around with a cast on.
     

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