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10mile race

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Still Water, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. Still Water

    Still Water Yellow Belt

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    Hey guys, I'm training for a ten mile race at the Twin cities marathon. Yes I know this has nothing to do with fighting but y'all have good info. I was wondering if you guys have any routines for training for this. My goal is to finish in the top 100, which means in about an hour and five minutes. My time last year was an hour and fifteen minutes. My routine was(is) this:
    Sunday 6 mi
    Tue 3.5 mi
    Wed 2.5 mi
    Thu 5.5 mi
    Fri 3 mi
    Sat 2.5 mi

    Sun 6 mi
    Tue 3.5 mi
    Wed 2.5 mi
    Thu 5.5 mi
    Fri 3 mi
    Sat 2.5 mi

    Sun 7 mi
    Tue 3.5 mi
    Wed 3 mi
    Thu 6 mi
    Fri 3 mi
    Sat 2.5 mi

    etc. it goes on from there, does anyone have a routine with speedwork to bring my time down? Any help woud be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. ArmyBJJ

    ArmyBJJ MMA Training

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    It is bad to run everyday, you might think you are doing your body well but you actually aren't. Many injuries can be caused from running everyday of the week. The best thing to do is run at the maximum of four times a week. Make sure you add sprints into your workout because that will help you with your stamina and breathing. When you run make sure it is 10miles, the best way to train for a ten mile run is to actually run the ten miles. I believe if you ran 10 miles three times a week and mixed in some sprints, you will do well.

    Just to give you some background, so you don't think I'm some computer nerd that doesn't know what I'm talking about. I run two miles in 12.24 and not even winded. And that is the workout that I do.
     
  3. wooshman

    wooshman Guest

    You're mileage looks a little lacking if you're planning on running a 65 minute time. Is the course flat or hilly? Also how is the temperature gonna be? I'd recommend that you do some 12-15 mile days as well every week or atleast every two weeks to build a good base of strength. Throw in some tempo runs, intervals and lots of hills and you should definately hit a personal record. I'd go a little more conservative than dropping 10 minutes off your first time running though. Unless of course you didn't train for the first one.


    Many top runners train every day running. If Still is in good shape there is no reason why he can't run 6 times per week.
     
  4. trooper77

    trooper77 Orange Belt

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    Some people are just not biomechanically suited for running but that doesn't mean that the average person can't run every day. When I was running in college...we ran twice a day--every day. I often put in as much as 120 miles per week. It all depends on what your goals are. For the average Joe who wants to compete in the occassional 10K, I would say that 30 - 40 miles per week is plenty. The main thing that I notice is that you don't run your race distance (10 miles) during the week. You should get at least 1 long run (above your race distance) per week. And since you are trying to get your time down to that 6 minute per mile pace...you should be doing some type of interval work.

    I would suggest going to the track once or twice per week and doing something faster than your goal race pace. Example: 2 mile warm-up followed by 5 repeat miles (5:30 - 5:45 per mile pace) with an 800 meter recovery jog in between each interval. Finish up with a 1 mile easy cooldown. Total workout mileage= 10 miles.

    For your second workout of the week--you could do something faster paced--such as repeat 400 meter intervals with a 200 or 400 meter jog recovery. Or do a fartlek run on the roads. I always ejoyed doing fartlek ladder workouts such as 1 minute hard/ 1minute easy...2 minutes hard/2 minutes easy...all the way up to 5 minutes and then back down to 1 minute.

    Another good workout is doing hill repeats. Typically, you want to do your high mileage and strength building (base) workouts early in your race season and then lower your mileage and focus more on speed workouts (repeat 200m- 400m intervals) as you taper towards your goal race. Good luck
     

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