Help needed: Whey Protein for kid's breakfast | Page 2

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by therealdope, Nov 25, 2016.

  1. EL CORINTHIAN Purple Belt

    EL CORINTHIAN
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    Perfect! If they enjoy it that way then it's even easier and there are so many things you can do to introduce variety into a shake. Perhaps buy yourself some PB2 (Dried peanut powder) It's like half the fat/calories of PB with more protein relative to the weight and it gives everything a peanut flavor.
     
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  2. therealdope Gold Belt

    therealdope
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    Going to try Casein first. Thanks for the tip though.
     
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  3. EL CORINTHIAN Purple Belt

    EL CORINTHIAN
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    Yea this wouldn't replace the casein. You would add this for flavoring and to sneak in some more protein. 5 grams of protein per 45 calories.
     
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  4. feelinCrisp White Belt

    feelinCrisp
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    Some easy ways to get around it are to bake banana bread, muffins, etc, using different types of flour, I use a coconut flour. I don't know about your location, but my local grocery store also carries 2 separate brands of sprouted grain bread (Silver Hills and Ezekiel 4:9). There's a lot less of the bullshit in sprouted grain bread, and zero added sugar. Kids can't really tell the difference. It's a pretty normal thing that kids will want to eat more carb and sugar heavy foods, as it's harder for them to make the connection that sugar is an addiction.

    Some breakfasts I make for my kids and me on the regular include: overnight oats, PBJs with an organic all nut butter and organic jam (or no jam), granola + fruits in plain yogurt, scrambled eggs with sweet potato home fries, or beans, chicken sausages, and sometimes left over from the night before if it's something balanced.

    EDIT: Smoothies, french toast (with that same bread) are also staples in our house.

    The important things to remember are a) kids need more glucose in their diet than adults do b) balance is everything. If you give your kids PBJs for breakfast, tuna sandwiches for lunch, and spaghetti for dinner, you're overloading them. They need a healthy amount of carbs, but the more they eat it, the more they expect it; and if they're eating processed foods elsewhere it's easy for them to unknowingly become addicted to sugar and then they complain that real foods taste bad and blah blah blah.

    Hope this helped :)
     
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  5. Tayski Purple Belt

    Tayski
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    As a French person I was shocked at what you call "French toast" in the US. I had it a couple of times in New York and it was literally fried bread, and tons of butter, sugar and cinnamon. I still have absolutely no idea why you call it "French" toast, we have nothing like that in France apart from something called "pain perdu" which exists in many countries and is a poor man's dish: basically gone off bread cooked in milk and eggs with sugar.
     
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  6. feelinCrisp White Belt

    feelinCrisp
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    I dont know how americans make french toast, I'm French Canadian. But yeah I soak slices of bread (not past expiry) in a combination of eggs, almond milk vanilla and cinnamon. Then I fry it on a pan lightly greased with coconut oil. Then I will spread cashew butter or ehatever over it, or maple syrup if I'm feeling skinny.

    EDIT: as for the poor mans dish Im not sure what food costs in France are compared to North America, but a meal of french toast using fresh ingredients is one of the more costly breakfast options.
     
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  7. Tayski Purple Belt

    Tayski
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    Your version of French toast sounds much better than the American one I've had, especially the almond milk, vanilla, cooking it in coconut oil, and the casher butter. It also indeed sounds a lot more expansive. The one I was having in New York was literally full fat; fried in butter and with tons of sugar on it, nothing fancy and quite sickly.

    If you're French Canadia don't you call it "pain doré" over there? :)
    I swear one of my Quebecois friends call it that!
     
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  8. feelinCrisp White Belt

    feelinCrisp
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    Lol!! Oui, quand nous parlo s en Francais c'est du pain dore, mais pour les anglophones c'est french toast :)

    That might be an American thing, or maybe a restaraunt thing. I don't really eat out so I wouldn't know.
     
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  9. Tayski Purple Belt

    Tayski
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    Anything related to food with the word 'French' in it sounds so much fancier and tastier :) I guess it's just a marketing trick!
     
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  10. therealdope Gold Belt

    therealdope
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    Lost bread? Is that what it's called? I guess it's a recipe for stale bread. In the US no one uses old stale bread.

    I grew up in Europe and we called it "fried bread". You can get some great French toast in the US if you don't go to a shitty place. We have a couple of places in town here that do fabulous French toast. One place does a strawberry - orange butter,the other bakes their own raisin bread that they then do as French toast. They have an option of "deep fried" but that's just too much for me.
     
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  11. therealdope Gold Belt

    therealdope
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    I'm Canadian as well but live in the US. Most legit places soak fairly thick bread in egg/cream mixture and then throw butter on the griddle before coking the French toast. You often get it with fresh berries at better spots.
     
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  12. feelinCrisp White Belt

    feelinCrisp
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    Sounds wicked, I'm sure some places will coat the shit out of it in powdered sugar or whatever, but the way I do it is delicious and pretty healthy.

    Nothing beats deep fried bread, lathered in a shitty quality butter and covered in sugar, diabetes, DELICIOUS!
     
    #32
  13. Bluesbreaker Brown Belt

    Bluesbreaker
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    You could not feed your children that disgusting stuff. But if you insist, have something way more natural like a pea or rice protein.
     
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  14. therealdope Gold Belt

    therealdope
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    To me, fried bread is what the british serve at breakfast. Bread is is soaked in the left over drippings of bacon and sausage and fried. Can't imagine a worse morning diet than the full english.
     
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  15. Tayski Purple Belt

    Tayski
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    Full English breakfast is the perfect hangover cure though!
     
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  16. therealdope Gold Belt

    therealdope
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    I would imagine the full english being more effective while you're drinking.

    I did business swing around England starting in Cardiff with French, Italian and dutch colleagues. On the 4th day I'm at the full English breakfast bar and Italian is just staring at the friend tomatoes, and in a sad voice says, "look at these poor tomatoes. Why did they have to fry them as well? THey could have just left the tomatoes alone, I mean everything else is fried, why not spare the tomatoes?"

    I nearly busted a gut laughing.
     
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  17. Tayski Purple Belt

    Tayski
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    I always ask for no tomatoes in my Full English, just give me the sausages, eggs, bacon, mushrooms, black pudding, hash brown and toast. That with a massive cappuccino and fresh juice on the side. Hangover sorted.

    As a French person I do cringe at some of the food habits in the UK though.
     
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  18. therealdope Gold Belt

    therealdope
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    As continental born myself, I appreciate Black Pudding because it's not something we eat. But other than that, it's just heart attack on a plate.
     
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  19. Codger Brown Belt

    Codger
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    In fairness, nobody actually eats full English breakfasts daily in the UK. It's usually a treat or hangover thing. I do love them despite the 3000 Cal's of processed meat and fat!

    Some continental breakfasts you get on holidays are pretty awful. Who wants garlicky sausage at 7am? I'll never forget the people's breath in the morning ski bus in Austria. Grim. And not sure croissants are the epitome of health.
     
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  20. Tayski Purple Belt

    Tayski
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    Black pudding is a big thing in France, boudin noir :D You don't have it in Canada? :eek:

    It's heart attack on a plate, hence why it's only a one off when hangover for me. I definitely wouldn't be able to eat that everyday for breakfast.
     
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