You think its important as a Boxer to become effective in all styles?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by fightingrabbit, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    Do you think its important in your growth as a Boxer to be able to fight as long range fighter and as a fighter in the pocket? And to be able to utilize all styles in one way or another? Now im not saying techniques like Ali pulling his head back to avoid punches or his lead rights, or Naseems rising upperjab. I dont mean necessarily in techniques that require heightened physical attributes. I mean being able to change up your style to effectively dismantle your opponents.

    Like say a short fighter whos known for his mauling on the inside, all of a sudden being able to dance like Ali around his opponent popping off jabs in his face. Is it important for and as a fighter to become effective in a game thats not his? That doesnt necessarily play into his build?

    The reason i ask is because, lately i've been finding that through sparring, I've usually been fighting the wrong game. I'm short..well lots shorter than most people i box, and i've been trying to box on the outside. I dont try to, I think its because subconciously i WANT to be able to fight outside, and win with jabs and be able to win at that game. So ive been boxing like that in the ring. Even when i should be fighting small.

    The Rocky Marciano defense thread got me thinking..I dont want to be known or attributed to just being a one faceted fighter who only knows how brawl on the inside. Even in the beginning of the video, it said "The old saying goes, If you miss Marciano with a jab, he'd stick his face out to apologize" Even though, yeah i know, its complete and utter bs and untrue, but sadly its what most people think of him as. A slugger that lacked defense and a jab. So that got me wondering. Is it really THAT important to learn all the styles of boxing? Or do most boxers just get by on just their game alone? Did Marciano go undefeated just by playing HIS game and his game only, and making everyone adhere to his rules?

    I guess its the old fighters dilemma, That tall asses wish they could maul on the inside like Tyson, and short fighters wish they could dance and pick apart opponents from outside like Hearns or Ali.
     
  2. Anir

    Anir White Belt

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    Personally I'd say it is important to be able to deal with all types of opponent. Now that does not mean learning all the ranges etc, but means that you are able to apply yourself to defending and attacking an opponent.

    An example - as a terminal short ass I can not fight an outside game. So, I work from the inside. Now, i spar with one guy a lot who always uses his jab. So I eliminate that Jab with positioning. However, there is one guy who is very fast with his punches, and so I do not neccessarily want to trade blows with him. Therefore, I learn to eliminate his punces with successful counterpunching. These are solutions to different approaches.

    But what if you are on the receiving end? What if it is your opponent who is eliminating your way of boxing? Mix it up. I am always moving forward looking for body shots. So if i encounter a guy like this, I continue with my moving forward, but i look to come in from different angles, and approach him with a different game - perhaps less focus on defense and more movent to attack him,or more on defense, and more counterpunching.

    It is all situational. You cannot master al forms of boxing. I will never be a fantastic out-fighter because I am 5 ft5 (just under :( ) . So, i know that my game plan has to be in0fighting, but to what extent i take this plan is variable, depending on the opponent, and if I am injured. Look at Calzaghe. He has an incredibly high workload. But when he injured his hand in the Lacy fightm he started looking for the one-punch in and out attacks, and tilised more counterpunching, with less combinations.
     
  3. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    i see your point. But still, how did Marciano go about being undefeated with his style of boxing? Wasnt there someone out there who could have negated his constant forward pressure? Or was he just so good at his game that he able to overcome all reaches and all out boxers. Or is he just one of them exceptions to the rule.
     
  4. Kosh

    Kosh Guest

    I am more of a brawler, I rush to the guy, but sometimes I have to "dance" around the guy... Don't stick to one technique, the more you learn and the more versatile you get, the better....
     
  5. Anir

    Anir White Belt

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    Marciano was somewhat odd in that he was very big and yet didn't allowed himself more than just his jab - he continued with flurries of very strong punches. The mere presence of such a large guy throwing such heavy punches is very awkward to deal with. You could only hope to tire him out and play successful defense, but of course he wouldn't let that happen.
     
  6. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Marciano also built up his record against plenty of overmatched opposition. I mean Nikolai Valuev nearly broke that record without having faced but two legitimate credible opponents on the World Level.

    There are pressure Fighters, and there are guys like Duran, and Carmen Basillio, and Marcel Cerdan or Jake LaMotta.

    There are brawlers and there are guys like Vicente Saldivar, Hatton, Jeff Fenech, and Michael Katsidis.

    There are volume punchers, and there are guys like Aaron Pryor and Tony Margarito (when he's on his game).

    There are big punchers and there are guys like Carlos Monzon, Wilfredo Gomez, and Alexis Arguello.

    There are Boxers and there are Floyd Mayweather Jr.'s, Emile Griffith's, and Sugar Ray Leonard's.

    Then there's the RARE diamonds who can do all of the above, like Sugar Ray Robinson, Holman Williams, Kid Gavilan, Charley Burley, Salvador Sanchez, and Azumah Nelson.

    Basically what I'm saying, is watch those guys. Almost all of them could deal with adversity regardless of their own limitations, if they had any.
     
  7. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    Point taken.
     
  8. i'd rather be really good at one thing than half-ass in two things.

    that said, it's nice to have a lot of tools in the bag.
     
  9. 5acrossYOeye

    5acrossYOeye Silver Belt

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    filthy right hand.
     
  10. van1ty

    van1ty Banned Banned

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    are olympic level judoka equally good at all throws? no.

    you need well roundedness and specialization at the same time to be successful.
     
  11. Marvin Covar

    Marvin Covar Amateur Fighter

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    ^^^ amen to that.
     
  12. high right kick

    high right kick Blue Belt

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    how many times have you seen a guy get blown out because he was 1 dimensional?
    now how many times have you seen a guy get blown out because he was too well rounded? I would think being like bernard hopkins(good at everything but not GREAT at anything) is more achievable then trying to be like the diamonds of boxing.
     
  13. boxer steve

    boxer steve Brown Belt

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    When KK metioned the the greats like Duran he forgot to mention that well rounded also means knowing where the ref is at all times and when to use your head, or elbow,or shoulder.
    I think you all have posted right. You must know how to do it all. You dont have to be perfect just able to adapt.
     
  14. boxer steve

    boxer steve Brown Belt

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    When KK metioned the the greats like Duran he forgot to mention that well rounded also means knowing where the ref is at all times and when to use your head, or elbow,or shoulder.
    I think you all have posted right. You must know how to do it all. You dont have to be perfect just able to adapt.
     

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