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Workout/Post workout drink

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by JimLahey, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. JimLahey

    JimLahey White Belt

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    I'm weighing about 240 and i want to drop about twenty pounds while still gaining muscle. I've been doing a cardio of about 30 minutes, which includes doing eliptical with high resistance for 15 minutes and then doing a speed later and footwork for about another 15. I then lift weights for about 45 minutes. After my work out i drink a whey isolate mixed with water. I am also watching what I eat. My main question is that an efficient way to lose body fat while gaining muscle?
     
  2. Origins

    Origins Blue Belt

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    It's pretty near impossible to lose 20 pounds AND gain significant muscle mass. Gaining weight basically requires more calories in than out, losing weight basically requires more out than in. So you can't do both at the same time with very much success. Focus on one at a time.
     
  3. CrazyNutz

    CrazyNutz White Belt

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    Ive lost 50 lbs while making small -med strength gains. I've done it by doing a 500 calorie deficit, no cardio at all, 4 days of weight lifting, where I stay low on volume, pretty high towards my 1 RM on all lifts.

    Edit: Should be noted that I am still in the noob gains of strength gains, which some of the board believes is easier to make gains in while being on a calorie defecit.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2010
  4. Origins

    Origins Blue Belt

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    You can make strength gains while losing weight especially if you are just starting to lift. However, barring use of steroids, it's difficult to impossible to gain muscle mass while on a caloric deficit.

    If your goal is to make moderate strength gains while losing weight, that can be done with some success. But actually gaining muscle mass and losing weight is a different story.
     
  5. pliftkl

    pliftkl Green Belt

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    Very little of the new lifter strength gains truly come from adding muscle mass. The vast majority of them come from your body simply learning how to lift something heavy. When someone is new and they try to lift a weight, their brain just isn't that good at recruiting muscle fibers to work together and move a weight. However, it's a skill, and as you work at it, your brain gets better at it.
     
  6. bubbakeg

    bubbakeg White Belt

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    If you wanna lose fat keep doing your normal workout, but focus on your diet. Eat clean foods like brown rice, chicken breast, vegetables etc. You really have to be disciplined in your diet to get good results.

    It does end up being a calorie game. Start eating less but eat good clean foods and you should start to lose weight but also maintain your strength.
     
  7. Endo

    Endo o hai!

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    Short answer... No, not really. What you can, and should do, is focus on retaining as much muscle as possible during your weight-loss transition.

    When dieting, your body starts to shut down what it considers to be "costly" functions. In other words, functions that use a good bit of energy (building/retaining muscle). A BMR calculator is used to figure out your amount of maintenance calories to function properly/normally, if you were a couch potato and did absolutely nothing all day. Considering most diet at less than their BMR, it only makes sense that the body begins to shut down energy "wasting" functions.

    So again, short answer... No.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2010
  8. -Rottweiler-

    -Rottweiler- No belt, all action.

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    A small to moderate deficit (400 to 700 calories/day) with the vast majority of calories coming from healthy fats and protein coupled with very heavy lifting and a bit of intense conditioning (sprint intervals, bodyweight exercise routines) has worked best for me in terms of losing fat and conserving muscle mass. That approach will take some time though, as one pound of fat is worth 3500 calories.
     
  9. Gold182

    Gold182 Green Belt

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    A white belt with good knowledge has the world gone mad?

    Anyhow TS list to this guy he seems to know what hes doing!
     
  10. miaou

    miaou barely keeping it together

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    It is hard, it is not impossible. But I guess it depends what you mean by "near impossible" and "significant muscle mass.

    You are right in that gaining weight requires a caloric surplus and losing weight requires a caloric deficit. The TS asked about losing weight while gaining muscle, which is a bit different. Depending on the circumstances it is possible to build muscle mass on an overall caloric deficit (obviously the rate of muscle gains will not be impressive).

    JL, based on the little information provided in your post I would think that doing cardio would be counter-productive to your goals.
     
  11. Origins

    Origins Blue Belt

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    I guess that in some cases, like a fatty on SS, you could do both. I was thinking about an athletic person with some strength training experience.
     

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