Who coined the term haymaker?

Discussion in 'Boxing Discussion' started by Hester65, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. Hester65

    Hester65 Black Belt

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    I know what a haymaker is, but I don't know who started its use or where it came from. I guess this is a bit of trivia.

    The reason I ask this is because I was asked myself and I had no clue.
     
  2. bradlee180

    bradlee180 Banned Banned

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    From "Listening to American" by Stuart Berg Flexner (Simon and Schuster, New York, 1982): "haymaker, for a knockout punch, appeared in 1912, perhaps from the 1880 'hit the hay,' go to sleep."
    "haymaker" (a powerful boxing punch which mimics the motion of cutting hay with a scythe).
     
  3. Saku4me

    Saku4me Banned Banned

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    Umm, partially because his last name is Haye and he throws bombs so that's how he got the nickname HayEmaker
     
  4. GlassJaw

    GlassJaw SBC hustler.

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    coolest nickname ever
     
  5. Hester65

    Hester65 Black Belt

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    I wasn't asking about David Haye's nickname....

    but thanks for trying to help
     
  6. Hester65

    Hester65 Black Belt

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    Thanks, know I can tell the person who asked me about it where it came from...

    Also, thanks for adding to my boxing knowledge
     

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