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When did you start sparring?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by MAILMAN, Aug 6, 2005.

  1. MAILMAN

    MAILMAN Banned Banned

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    Here's the deal i started muay thai and i've only done it for three weeks , but all we have been doing is kicks. i want to start sparring because i feel i thats the best way to learn. Is my school to passive or am i just trigger happy.
     
  2. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    You're just trigger happy, and apparently anxious for a butt-kickin. One step at a time grasshopper.
     
  3. Metafour

    Metafour 武士道

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    You usually don't start sparring until several months of training.
     
  4. AgentZ

    AgentZ Blue Belt

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    Your first mistake is thinking you know whats best for you. You will start when whoever is in charge feels you are ready to.
     
  5. alvis sanosoc

    alvis sanosoc Blue Belt

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    or until the trainer deems you coordinated enough
     
  6. moodymikey

    moodymikey Blue Belt

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    I think you should just wait and see what the trainer gives you to do. Dont forget he has been training and learning the art a lot longer than you and generally will know whats best. It would be dangerous for you to start sparring this early in your training
     
  7. triggertap79

    triggertap79 Green Belt

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    to answer the question in your thread title: about two months into training, and you are correct, it is the best way to learn.
     
  8. phenomfan1529

    phenomfan1529 Brown Belt

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    Agreed.
    BTW, funny avatar kabuki
     
  9. wooshman

    wooshman Guest

    In fighting you often have to be hurt to learn. If you want to jump into sparring immediately I guarantee you'll get hurt to learn. Heh. But usually trainers will want you to get good at the basics before you start sparring.
     
  10. zaner

    zaner Banned Banned

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    Yep, you need to get so that straight punches and controlled technique instinctive so that you don't clobber your partner and then get killed. At least in my school thats what we do. Chill
     
  11. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    You're lucky your teacher isn't like me. When I taught I was VERY old school. Kids who came to my class and wanted to warp-speed their learning or dictate the pace of my class. I'd give them what they want. Oh you'll spar. First you'll go stand-up with my Muay Thai student, then you'll roll for an hour with one of my grapplers. If you come back (and those who did usually kept their mouth shut and eyes open and focused after that) then I'm sure you'd be ready to let the teacher do the teaching. lol
     
  12. Gregster

    Gregster Black Belt

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    You're trigger-happy, and also not adopting the correct attitude by thinking you know better than your instructor, who hasn't seen fit to start you sparring, what you ought to be doing (though to your credit, you at least acknowledge the possibility that you may be wrong).

    I used to get highly annoyed by newbies I was given the task of working with who kept telling me, a much senior belt with more experience who was way out of their league as a fighter, what they needed to be doing and how they ought to be fighting. In such cases I would ask them why they were paying good money to be trained if they already knew everything. If that failed, I would use the King Kabuki method and demonstrate in a more incontrovertible way why they were wrong (but dumping them on their asses a few times).

    I don't recall exactly at what point I started sparring, but schools vary. Generally, if the instruction is sound, you should master some basic and be able to perform drills half-ass proficiently before getting squared off with someone. Yes, sparring is where your training comes together, and you gain the experience, instinct, and toughness needed to be a good fighter. But showing someone a few basic and then having them fight makes about as much sense as teaching a drivers' ed student what the road signs mean and then giving them a license to drive.

    And is about as dangerous. If you lack control over your technique, you run the increased risk of seriously hurting someone. Honestly, I used to far prefer sparring experienced guys on my level not only for the challenge, but because I hated sparring newbies-- they had middling technique and poor control. I could generally count on a senior student controlling his attacks, "pulling" a kick that went awry and went towards an unintended target (like my face or head), and not spazzing out and kicking me in the nuts every other kick.

    Be patient, and let your instructor guide you. If he really is good, and you second-guess him, you're just holding yourself back.
     
  13. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Ain't that to truth. HA HA HA!! Man and then when they floor you with a shot to the ballz they walk around for a few minutes like they genuinely whooped your ass. God I hate that.

    New students who came to my class never understood that. They were a liability. They thought my Elder students who were hesitant to cut loose around them were genuinely afraid. Far from it. They were just aware that in order to take out guys like this you don't really rely on your overall skill level, you have to land something fast and hard, either directly before they even TRY to hit you, or just after absorbing a wave of uncontrolled and sloppy yet horrifyingly emotional attacks.

    My students took a while to understand why I never sparred much in the classes, but would when other teachers came as guests. It was for that reason. A match between two higher-skilled guys can be poetic. Posturing...a couple of short movements, then pow, one of them is on the floor holding his eye. lol I MUCH prefer that to some cursing, screaming, under-skilled moop charging me swinging his arms as if there's an axe between them.
     
  14. Barut

    Barut Banned Banned

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    I've been training MT for about a month now. I sparred for the first time last week. I wasn't expecting to, but my instructor told me to get in there. I went a total of five rounds with two different guys. It was a good experience for me. I got beat down pretty good, but I really feel I learned a lot. Just wait until your trainer thinks your ready. Having your lead leg bruised to hell isn't the greatest thing in the world anyway...
     
  15. Evilness

    Evilness Orange Belt

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    Patience :)
    In the gym I train everybody has to practise MT for at least two months before they can finally sparr.
     
  16. Gregster

    Gregster Black Belt

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    I hear ya...and I feel you pain. Really, I do.

    When I advanced enough to start training the new guys, I initially welcomed this as proof positive that I'd accrued a healthy amount of skill and experience to be trusted with the task of guiding novice students towards profieciency. I slowly realized that my instructor was pawning the task of sparring with the new guys off on me as much because I was able to do it as because it sparred him a hellish evening of absorbing spazz-kicks to the knees and the nutsack (cup or no cup, it sucks). All the while, you have to hold back and not do the sensible thing-- put them away fast-- because they're new and will learn nothing, get discouraged and quit, et al.

    A couple in particular I'll never forget. One guy, a green belt whose attendance in class was sporadic at best, would get flustered when hit with a mild combination and suddenly, out of nowhere, punch me in the face. Another guy was some Latin dude who also hardly ever showed up, and sucked in just about every regard except that he seemed to have mastered one technique: a head-level roundhouse kick, which he kept throwing at me. One night he hit me with a glancing one, whereupon I explained to him as best I could to keep his kicks down (his English was about as good as his TKD). The second time, I called over one of the senior guys, a Puerto Rican dude named Nelson who spoke flawless Spanish, and had him lay it out for him. The third time, he rocked my skull, whereupon I picked myself up and proceeded to whip the hell out of him. This more or less happened with two other guys he got paired up with that night, and I don't think he ever came back after that.
     
  17. Falero

    Falero Black Belt

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    I started after a few months. Some let you do it almost instantly. Trust the trainer, he
     
  18. Cap'n

    Cap'n <img src="http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/1955/

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    I wasn't allowed to spar until my trainer deemed I was ready, and I'm glad he did it that way. I thought I was ready earlier on, but i sure as hell wasn't.
     
  19. wizard

    wizard Orange Belt

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    dammm when i was 14 (25 now)i started mt and the first day we did sparring.....................so for me it was normal............of course i got my azz kicked the whole time............
     
  20. MTJJ_PuMpED

    MTJJ_PuMpED Guest

    I started the first day.. lighlty tho.
     

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