What do you look for in a trainer?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by freaky, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. freaky

    freaky Banned Banned

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    Does it matter if they fought before or not?
    If yes, do you care about record? 0-20?
    Years trained?
    Years teaching? First year?
    Students taught?

    Do you ask for your trainers credentials?
    Do you ask them any of these questions?

    What do you guys look for?
    What matters and what don't?

    How about someone who has been training for a few years but never fought in a real fight? No ammy fights or nothing?

    Or maybe someone who trained for decades but never fought?

    Or someone who only trained a year but fought many times?

    How will you choose? What's most important?


    I think to me the most important thing is how they teach and whether they know their art or not.
     
  2. SummerStriker

    SummerStriker Black Belt

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    1) I watch him teach to see if he's smooth and knowledgeable.

    2) I talk to him to see if he's calm.

    3) I try a class to see if he or his students are humble and chill or if they can be tricked into spazzing or crying with a little pressure.

    A couple years ago I visited this BJJ school while I was on vacation and took their gi class. The black belt teaching was a large guy, barrel chested and much stronger than me. He could have beaten me with technique if he was smaller, but he wasn't.

    He let me pull guard and I locked on, looking for a hip bump sweep. When he tried to break my grip on his gi, I didn't let go or let him pass, initially.

    He sighs in frustration and smash passes me, mounts, and cross-faces me hard enough to hurt my neck before arm barring me.

    Afterwards, he says, "you should try to flow more."

    I don't mind getting smashed or cross-faced. It happens every week. It sticks out in my mind because of all the crying he did.

    Then two of his students dodged me on the mat. I'm on vacation.

    Perfectly respectable competition gym with a great team and strong coaches. Wouldn't bother going back. If I put a little pressure on a stronger, better person and they throw a fit, probably not going to sign up to put up with their shit on the regular.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2016
  3. Henry Huggins

    Henry Huggins Green Belt

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    I've had a few coaches and knowledge & experience are probably the most important qualities but the best coaches I've had are passionate about their art. My main coach right now isn't the most knowledgeable I've had (which is no slight) but because he is passionate, he is willing to work with me on days the gym isn't open including holidays and always stays after class to work on whatever drills I need. On the flip side I've had extremely knowledgeable coaches who have lost their passion and it's clear in the way they teach.
     
  4. NVSemin

    NVSemin Orange Belt

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    1) big boobs .... sadly I have met no such specialist
     
  5. j123

    j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    -The trainer's ability to produce good fighters

    -The ability to be able to protect their fighters in the ring/cage. This to me is more important than the first point. Especially at amateur when there's close to no reward.
    All fighters have ego, no one is going to tap/give up as easily. A cornerman (usually coach) is there to protect the fighter, and call it quits when the damage becomes too severe. I've seen a coach berate his fighter and not throw in the towel when clearly his fighter was at his limits and ended up being a punching bag for near a entire round; And he wasn't blocking the shots, he was eating them on body and head. He was absolutely gassed at that point as well. When questioned about it, he mentioned he makes fighters, not bitches. Why the ref didn't stop it is something I wonder as well.

    -Ability to connect. A coach may be good, but if something's off, and I despise coming in to train, thats not a good match for me.
     
  6. TheyAllFloat

    TheyAllFloat Orange Belt

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    A trainer that has been around for a while and knows the industry. One that will try to get you good match-ups. One that can get you title shots. One thats been in the ring and been beaten. One that isnt strapped for cash.
     
  7. BigPapaShango

    BigPapaShango Green Belt

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    I actually don't mind if a coach has fought or not, I have trained with coaches who have fought several times and coaches that have never fought and found both to be highly knowledgeable and credible.

    What I look for in a coach is someone who is going to take time to teach you, to show you why movements and techniques are going to work and who will take time to correct your form and guide you.
     
    Reyesnuthugr and Skiprope like this.
  8. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Aside from the "in the ring and been beaten" part, you're describing a manager.

    They typically have the connections to make fights, and money.

    Trainers are usually broke because fighters don't like to pay us. We get paid in sob stories.
     
    ssullivan80 likes this.
  9. right hand lead

    right hand lead Green Belt

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    So true
     
  10. TheyAllFloat

    TheyAllFloat Orange Belt

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    Yeah Coming from an Aussie Muay Thai background you won't get 'managers' that aren't trainers / fighters mostly, there is just no money in it professionally- or in my experience anyway. So you can see how if you have broke trainer who is also matching you up could have a potential conflict of interest. I guess I didnt think of the boxing / pro mma context where its much bigger business and sharks circling everywhere.
     
  11. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    First off, if you are going to find the right trainer for YOU. You have to answer these questions yourself first!

    IMO, finding the right trainer is like finding the right girl. You just gotta get out there and start "shopping" and you'll learn what you want, like and can and can't deal with...... then you either commit to sticking around or "on to the next one". Sometimes one "session" is enough and you don't go back, other times, you stick around for a few weeks/months before you figure that out. Then there's those times where you settle in and get comfortable, but once you step out and try something new....... Either way, point being, finding the right trainer is personal and making a commitment based on resumes, opinions, record or any other external factor isn't necessarily the best or only way....... but it's a good start!


    Ya also gotta remember who's the "trainer" and who's the "student"....... eh?
     

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