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what are the personal things that helped or hurt your development as a striker

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by devante, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. devante

    devante Silver Belt

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    simple question, as we all have trained; we have all had individual experiences w/in our training that have helped or hurt or development as a striker, it could be mental, physical, stylistical or so on. But what are the things were a benefit (ex-being a natural, having a particular physical skillset (power speed explosiveness stamina toughness), training w/a high level of guys, training alot, etc) or things that were a deficit (not being a natural, lacking standout ability, health issues, etc)

    for me its as such
    pluses-

    1)alot of experience w/very skilled proponents of a myriad of arts, it helped develop a healthy respect for different ways of doing things and diff styles because i saw so many guys w/diff b/g who could all apply their skills in their art and when facing other arts (i.e. they can fight). So im not stuck in a certain way of doing things or a certain mindset of what works and what doesn't; im much more situational in my application or assessment of skills wether it be my own or those of people i observe. I always try to understand the method because my experience tells me everyone does something for a reason.

    2)sparring alot- any kind of sparring, light medium hard; up until the past few years i would get alot of sparring in, not that im a bad ass, technician or striking virtuoso. Im not; but i developed a certain functionality in my striking that comes from actually doing it, an i got a very good idea of what i can do and can't do against certain styles, body types and strategies. The biggest and best benefit is i know exactly how good or not good i am, the best way to find out where you stand is to spar; no misunderstanding about your skills when you do so.


    3)humbleness-never did any sports and was never really the best at anything; meaning i didn't have any problem w/not being the best or one of the better people, nor did i have a problem w/getting beaten up or worked over. Its all a learning experience, not a reflection of me as a man or a person; some people are used to having success or competing at a certain level, when they can't initially do so or never can do so they quit or quit developing.

    4)training w/people better than me, im almost always the WORST guy training; skillwise and ability wise, so it helps develop confidence cus you know your dealing w/the best guys and makes u much more confident against guys your level or worst. Also it helps you think and get more prepared for tough spots cus your always in them w/guys who are much better.

    5)mentality-always try to look at sh*t from every angle possible and understand how and why sh*t works instead of saying it does or doesn't; always willing to try and add things to what i do or do things that give me a better overall understanding of the philosophy mentality and strategy behind a technique or a style

    6)not being a natural, forced me to have to think outside the box and focus on the more subtle, intangible aspects of striking; since i don't have an ace in the hole physically ( power speed durability explosiveness etc)or a natural disposition to strike effectively or aggressively
    minuses-

    1)Health issues, has limited my ability to train consistently; i have a laundry list of problems which don't keep me from training, but keep me from working at a certain intensity all the time or from engaging in certain activities..

    2)Schedule-always had a schedule that made it difficult to train frequently, its only gotten worse w/the jobs i have had and having a kid... Not impossible but much more difficult.

    3)Sparring alot, helps develop a comfort and functionality; does not help develop a skillset.. You apply the skills you develop, if you spar alot, but don't do tech as much or more you kinda box yourself into a certain way of doing things based on what has worked; you never find out if other stuff works cus you don't develop other skills and the skills you do have plateau as far as technical progression.

    4)working w/people way better than me; depending on how good the guys your facing are and their mindset, you will find yourself trying to survive (not get koed or beat the f*ck up) moreso than trying to put work in, you almost become def by nature because your main goal is to be able to last long enough to do offense.

    5)mentality-im not the most disciplined martial artist and secondly i don't have a fighter mentality; when i train or spar i am told i don't come off as a guy who has that motivation aggression. I enjoy the martial arts can't say im super passionate or whatnot; when im training i train hard, i train good..but im not an animal, nor am i that guy who is just aching to get in and spar. Just not my mentality.
     
  2. Nostromo

    Nostromo Guest

    A good, experienced coach/trainer makes all the difference in the world in how well you learn and how much you improve.
     
  3. devante

    devante Silver Belt

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    im talking about things you control, example; i had a friend w/a great and experienced coach, but my friend isn't good at focusing and isn't really a motivated type. The coach can teach him all sorts of sh*t; but my friends personal shortcomings limit his tech growth.

    so what personal things help or hurt your progression
     
  4. chino0503

    chino0503 Black Belt

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    train with people who are better than me. spar with people who are better than me. doing separate work outs for conditioning bright and early then going back to the gym in the evening.... my fitness level has never been this high since i do conditioning IN THE MORNING.

    conditioning has always been my achilles heel.
     
  5. mikecello

    mikecello ...in bed belt

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    Ground fighting comes more naturally to me than stand-up. I seem to have trouble telling my feet and my hands to coordinate with one another in order not to get socked with a left hook.
     
  6. panamaican

    panamaican Senior Moderator Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Helped - Good physical skills. A willingness to treat other arts with an open mind and learn from them - probably the most important thing since by refusing to believe ay one art is completely better than another I've become much better at combining the principles. Finally found a big wrestler to train with regularly. Consistent strength training.

    Hindered - too much other work makes me miss training days way too often.

    Off topic: I was reading the Army Combatitives manual and found a better way to transition from striking into a single leg takedown. I'm sure it isn't new to many but it was new to me, lol.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2010
  7. lukewall

    lukewall Green Belt

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    Using my brain more, being more sneaky and tricky. That was a big turning point. Getting away from the straighforward, walk-you-down style of thai muay thai. And getting away from the take a hit to give a hit mentality.
     
  8. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    One thing I think that's helped me is that I'm a quick study. I'm able to take something I see, and be able to perform the physical movement almost immediately.

    Another thing I think that's helped me is that I've always had access to friends and family who were into some form of martial arts. So that gave me a resource for a variety of arts.

    Some things that have inhibited my progress?

    Lack of enthusiasm and dedication in my training partners.

    Some of the resources that I came across through the years were frauds.

    Some of the fighting systems were inferior to others.
     
  9. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Helped: Generally speaking

    - Desire to learn
    - Good Sparring Partners, Good Coaching
    - Commitment to physical fitness
    - Humility and keeping an open mind, not letting my knowledge or learning curve become static by allowing myself to be confined by 1style, or 1 way of doing things and dismissing others, but instead finding what I could learn and adapt to suit my ability.
    - understanding that LOSING IS A CHOICE, and that choice can be made inside or outside the ring.

    Helped: Technical aspect

    - learning to jab CORRECTLY: My father taught me to box, when i asked him to teach me...... I dont think i threw anything but a jab for the better part of an entire summer, I was young but looking back at pictures of that summer i noticeably have 1 shoulder/trap that is larger than other..... my jab hand..
    - Learning that defense doesn't mean not getting hit, it means choosing wisely which shot/shots your willing to take in order to return the favor
    - Learning to pivot on the front foot
    - Learning that not every shot is supposed to land and do damage, but instead to identify opportunities to throw ones that do......
    - sometimes the best defense is offense and vice-versa

    Hurt or deterred my progress:

    - trying to learn the intricacies before fully understanding the fundamentals.
    - over-training or training injured, not listening to my body when it was telling me to "take a break"
    - Overconfidence in the ring, forgetting that even though i am kicking this guys ass.... he is still standing, and as long as he is standing he is 1 shot away from ending the fight
    - Ego, thinking "I knew best" and dismissing advice or criticism by assuming the source of such advice or criticism wasn't credible to give that advice......... sometimes this is true, but often times you dismiss advice that would be very helpful by immediately dismissing the advice without first allowing yourself to think through it. Some of the best advice i have received over the years has been from guys who were not nearly as experienced or accomplished in the sport as i was..... nonetheless, good advice doesn't always come from a "superior", not everyone sees the same thing the same way, keep open to any criticism or advice! or you will wish you had!
     
  10. ThEiCeMaN6791

    ThEiCeMaN6791 Purple Belt

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    Things that have helped me besides genetics(Very fast with a lot of power) were mainly things that I learned in Karate that have helped me in MMA:

    And those two things are distance control and kicking technique.

    The one good thing about Karate that is very difficult to learn in any other art is DISTANCE CONTROL.
     
  11. owly

    owly White Belt

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    Helped: Being a girl.
    Technique!! Because my training partners are bigger/stronger/faster than me, I have learned to be more crafty.
    I never assumed I knew how to fight. I just learned things from the ground up, and I think I'm more well rounded for it.

    Hindered: Being a girl.
    No one wants to spar with you. Hitting a girl just isn't cool. Also, it's hard to find training partners who mimic what you will actually face in competition.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2010

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