Translating bag work to cage

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by t2kizz, May 13, 2014.

  1. t2kizz

    t2kizz White Belt

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    Forgive me if this has already been addressed, please just link the thread or page, but does anyone have any tips for translating combos and such I work on the bag into the cage? I know that a bag is fairly stationary and doesn't hit back, but it's like day and night with my hands on a bag compared to sparring/fighting.
     
  2. Ayin

    Ayin Black Belt

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    You have to learn the appropriate footwork to go with your punches, which is not just the footwork needed in throwing the punches, but also to get yourself into position to throw punches, proper angles of approach, ect. Otherwise the best you can hope for is a rock'em sock'em robots end result where you stand at a neutral position and punch while being punched.

    It's not a bad question though. In something like two years and a dozen amatuer fights it's not something I was taught. I could do solid work on a heavy bag or mits, pivoted on my punches and had good posture and positioning, but was never actually showed how to close to engage.
     
  3. -AsianGuy-

    -AsianGuy- White Belt

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    like the gent above said.

    I don't fight but I did spar a lot. I notice my arsenal is only as good as my training. from my blocks to the counter striking. Muscle memory is real.
    I'm starting train with different people even though i have to learn their training style. But I'm learning new things all the time. learning new counters and strikes



    Do you do footwork drills?

    Do you do foot work drills with strikes right after you move?

    Do you do avoidance drills with counter strikes?

    Do you shadow box and move?


    Maybe you just need more time sparring and get comfortable.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2014
  4. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    The most likely problem is that you don't do enough footwork training. If when you shadowbox, hit mitts, drill and hit the bag you're always stationary then you aren't gonna have the wheels to get your artillery in place. The most difficult thing about translating bag work to sparring is that the bag always consents to your range, your opponent almost never does unless it's on his terms, or he's better than you there. But the stupidly simple answer is that you can develop your ability to measure and close distance in other forms of training, so it isn't always necessary on the bag. Different tools have different purposes. That said, if you aren't developing the skills to move your feet into position to start hitting with other methods of training, then start dedicating your time on the bag to working on that.
     
  5. sickc0d3r

    sickc0d3r Red Belt

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    What kind of setup are you using? A free swinging heavy bag can help you integrate footwork and timing into your routine.
     
  6. Steve08

    Steve08 American Fedor Belt

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    Make sure to begin combos with feints, and end them with footwork or head movement, and from here, to practice them as such. This means turning a simple 1-2 into a 4 or 5 move combination with preliminary set-up techniques, and post-liminary defensive techniques. For example, feint body jab or cross, jab to head, side-step with rear foot, pivot off rear foot. An alternative would be to pivot off the lead foot after jabbing or throwing a right hand, and also, to hook while pivoting off the lead foot (this is a simply awesome technique, but will take some practice especially if you are looking to do it immediately after jabbing, which, while challenging, is very possible for anyone and is well worth it).

    Beginning a combo with a feint or fake (a fully thrown strike which you have no intention of landing; jabs work well) is just good practice, and side-stepping or pivoting (ideally both) after your combinations will force opponents looking to clinch, duck under or shoot on you to first turn and close the distance and make you much harder to take down. Also, it is important to vary feinted strikes with faked ones, as well as body feints performed using the shoulders, hips, knees, chest, and eyes. This will induce uncertainty into your opponent, creating opportunities to land strikes, and, at an advanced level of application, allowing you to control his reactions.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2014
  7. Tony Manifold

    Tony Manifold Brown Belt

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    do you ever half speed spar? This is something that isn't often done in the boxing world, at least not formally. Just get a partner, move around and practice those combos at half speed. Let your hands do what they know to do and focus on your footwork, tying the footwork drills with the punching drills. once you get a good feel for it, try it in regular sparring.
     

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