Training/Recovery dilemma...

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by bjornvil, Sep 28, 2010.

  1. bjornvil

    bjornvil Blue Belt

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    Hey guys

    I am 27 years old. 5"9'/170lbs.

    I've been doing BJJ for the last year, taking it pretty seriously the last 9 months.
    My problem is that I can't train as much as I would like to :( Usually I can go 4 training sessions a week without being too burnt out, but sometimes, for example if I go three nights in a row, my body is just aching on the third day and I can't train effectively.

    I train in the evenings. Usually I do both the beginners and advanced classes, so I'm training from 6pm until about 9pm. I train in the gi Monday and Wednesday and do Nogi on Tuesdays. I usually can't train on Thursdays but every other week I do a Judo class on Fridays. Weekends are usually no training.
    I don't do any weight lifting or conditioning outside of these sessions, but I would love to be able to go in the morning og during lunch to do some S&C but I don't want to skip BJJ class for that.

    I eat pretty healthy most of the time, but don't use any supplements. I sometimes don't get enough sleep though. I get usually about 6-7 hours of sleep. I work a desk job 9-5.

    Now... my question is, do you guys have any suggestions for supplements or diet or whatever to help me with recovery to be able to train more often during the week? I've heard guys going for 10-12 sessions a week without any trouble... My body is just a mess if I do more than 4-5 sessions a week.

    In short:
    * I'm a fit 27 year old, eat semi healthy, never used any supplements.
    * I train BJJ 3-5 times a week, about 3 hours each time.
    * Would like to be able to train more but body weak although mind strong :(
    * Looking for suggestions for supplements or whatever I can do to improve my recovery so I can train like a champ! :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. LZD

    LZD Purple Belt

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    What is your diet like? I doubt your problem is diet related or that it can be solved by changing diet/adding supps. Eat more eat healthier. Get enough protein. Do you take protein shakes? Multi-vitamin 3-6 days per week and omega 3 every day.

    If you want to do strength training, perhaps drop 1-2 BJJ sessions at first (as in break up consecutive bjj training) and phase in strength training. 1 day per week at first. After a few weeks add in another day. Keep it minimal, like the 2 day split in the FAQ.

    Eat a lot more, get bigger and stronger. Your body will very quickly adapt to weight training. Once you get over that hurdle, start phasing in more bjj, slowly. But take regular breaks. Have a day off every now and then.


    No magical cure I am afraid...
     
  3. superking

    superking Poet — Traveler — Soldier of Fortune

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    I currently get in 4 sessions a week, around an hour each, of BJJ. And lift three times a week as well. I'm turning 28 in October. I've realized in the last couple years that I just can't be careless with my food intake or training and expect to be able to bounce back like I could at 22 or 23.

    I stopped drinking for the most part because of this, I now limit my alcohol intake to special occasions and vacations. I can't eat crappy food because it fucks my digestion all up, which really limits how well I can train and recover. So I cleaned up my diet a lot.

    An extra quart of milk a day does wonders for my body in terms of recovery. But that's just me. We're getting older. Eat more quality food.
     
  4. bjornvil

    bjornvil Blue Belt

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    That's what I've been afraid of... damn! :(
     
  5. superking

    superking Poet — Traveler — Soldier of Fortune

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    It ain't all bad! Since having cleaned up my diet and refrained from overdoing it when drinking, I've become the sexiest version of myself ever!

    Haha.
     
  6. bjornvil

    bjornvil Blue Belt

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    Hehe yeah, I'm in the best shape of my life, although I've never been in really bad shape. It's just performance that's lacking :)

    Quick question as I don't want to make a new thread... Am I just wasting my money using L-Glutamine? Some people have told me Glutamine is good for recovery. Should I look into using Creatine instead?
     
  7. dropshot001

    dropshot001 Red Belt

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    More cals will help with recovery, especially protein. Glutamine is hit and miss with some people, it all depends. I've found bcaas help with my recovery
     
  8. hardheart

    hardheart Brown Belt

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    1. How much protein do you eat?
    2. How much fish do you eat?
    3. Are you in the US? If not, where are you?
    4. What is getting sore, joints or muscles?
    5. What is your idea of "pretty healthy"? Describe a typical day's meals, or even a typical week's worth.

    Some generic advice is as follows:

    1. Take up the following supplements: whey protein, fish oil, greens, creatine
    2. For muscle soreness, whey protein immediately (within 30 minutes) after training will help 1000 millons times
    3. For joint soreness, while not all experience great relief, some people have stated fish oil helps and is proven to help reduce inflamation, which is the primary cause of joint aches
    4. Eat a protein and a green with every meal
    5. If you don't want to start going to a gym for S/C training, try the 100 pushup challenge it's easy. Do pushups until you can do 100 on form pushups with ease. After you can do 100, start timing yourself and trying to lower your time. After that, start working on single arm pushups. While not a true substitute for a proper s/c program, its better than nothing.
     

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