Training for explosive hips

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by VTJas81, Aug 1, 2005.

  1. VTJas81

    VTJas81 Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boston
    On the Bas Rutten's Big DVDs of COmbat, Bas mentions a key physical trait to have is an explosive hip. So you can bridge and get out of any situation. He had a partner lay across his stomach and he bucked him up repeatedly. So if you don't have a partner I was thinking of using a medicine ball and explode up with your hips. Keep doing that for reps and keep trying to pop the ball higher. What do you all think?
     
  2. Stephan Kesting

    Stephan Kesting Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2002
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    213
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    You can do that. You can also use weight training to help develop strength in your lower back and hamstrings. Use exercises like deadlifts, stifflegged deadlifts, hyperextensions and hamstring curls.

    I agree with Bas that a strong bridge is important, but keep things in perspective: he is blessed with a ridiculous amount of fast twitch muscle and would also have incredibly strong hip flexors and extensors even if he had never worked out a day in his life.

    Stephan Kesting
    www.grapplearts.com
     
  3. 1snowman

    1snowman Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    America
    Although the guy is kinda a tool, Matt Furey's book called "Combat Conditioning" is one of the best books I have read on this subject. He claims to have learned it all from gene LeBelle.

    It is really good, and it excellent for back bridges, neck strengthening, and muscle endurance.

    It is weight free, and it focuses on real life situations that you would find yourself in in combat sports.

    MUCH BETTER THAN WEIGHT LIFTING (which, as we know, only stiffens and prones the body to more injuries).
     
  4. Ghostrider

    Ghostrider Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    0
    I used to lift weights a lot and I agree about the stiffness although I understand that you can strike a balance and utilize weight training effectively. I believe that my explosiveness in wrestling came specifically from weight training. I haven't lifted weights in a while and I do feel the difference as I am not as explosive without the weight training. everyone is different so this may not apply to you. I did injure my back and just recently started to train again after a loooong layoff so you must work on flexibility. I also am looking at the video mentioned.
     
  5. Stephan Kesting

    Stephan Kesting Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2002
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    213
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    "MUCH BETTER THAN WEIGHT LIFTING (which, as we know, only stiffens and prones the body to more injuries). "

    With all due respect I think that this statement is incorrect. If you look at combat athletes (boxers, wrestlers, judokas) at an elite or Olympic level they all do weight training, virtually without exception. For that matter, gymnasts, sharpshooters, cross-country skiers and ballerinas do weight training as well. Eddie Bravo weight trained before tapping out Royler at ADCC, and it didn't seem to stiffen his body...

    I'm not saying that bodyweight exercises aren't important - in fact last Friday I submitted an article to Grappling Magazine on that very subject - but weight training is very important for high-level performance.

    Stephan Kesting
    www.grapplearts.com
     
  6. RobT

    RobT Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,547
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Swansea, Wales, UK
    Uh oh.

    If weight lifting makes you stiff and injury prone, you're doing something wrong. It's only ever made me stronger.
     
  7. Ghostrider

    Ghostrider Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    0
    for what it's worth, I agree with Stephan and Rob.
     
  8. colinm

    colinm Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,441
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Joe's Garage
    proper weight training will not negatively effect your flexibility, "make you stiff", or slow you down or any of that bullshit. if you stretch out, lift correctly (read: according to you needs - NOT A BODYBUILDING PROGRAM), and keep training then lifting weights will benefit your grappling tremendously. some of you guys need to go to S&P and get educated.

    Dont look at professional bodybuilders or overweight and out of shape heavyweight powerlifters and say, "look, weight training makes you stiff and immobile" - because those people train differently and have different goals than you. and bjjers especially could benefit from not being such pussies and getting physically stronger - take it from a bjjer.

    ive gotten really really really good results from a strength and endurance training program based on the big 3 movements - deadlift, squat, and bench - grip work, tabatas (a variation on HIIT - high intensity interval training with exercises instead of sprints), and lots of stretching on top of 2 a week bjj training (i know, i know i should train more but its the summer and ive got a full time job that fucks my training time). my flexibility, gas, and strength have never been better. check out my training log in s&p if your interested.
     
  9. thedon_1

    thedon_1 Orange Belt

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think it's just that whenver someone wants to start using weights to help their bjj or boxing or whatever, many people use bodybuilding routines, not knowing that they are any different from other routine. They think bigger muscles = more performance but that is wrong.

    If you use a good routine which combines maybe max rep and explosive lifts on 1 day, and then high rep endurance and bodyweight excercises on another, you will get much better results.

    Once you start doing more deadlifts, cleans and good morning e.t.c. and start lifting explosively, you will be more explosive.
     
  10. Dedicado

    Dedicado Machetero

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    969
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    British Columbia, Canada
    Man, I gotta tell you and all the bros here that M.F. is really B.S.! I stopped lifting and did his combat conditioning after getting a back spasms, from incorrect form I found out later and not from some evil weightlifting genie! I had gotten up to 210 reps on the hindu squats, but guess what, I had developed absolutely no strength in my legs whatsoever. Sure, I have great muscular endurance in my legs, but I am not one bit stronger or more explosive now than when I could only do 25 reps. Go to s&p, like I did, and get the proper facts on lifting for the fight game.
     
  11. Dedicado

    Dedicado Machetero

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    969
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    British Columbia, Canada
    Hey, Mr. Kesting! Great articles on anklelocks in Grappling Magazine, sir! Btw, do you still hang with Denis Kang? How's his hand doing? (much better I hope) Peace!
     
  12. Spoonman7

    Spoonman7 Red Belt

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2003
    Messages:
    8,999
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    California
    As long as you warm up properly and stretch and don't do a ridiculous routine, weightlifting will only help.
     
  13. Gsoares2***

    Gsoares2*** Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2005
    Messages:
    3,319
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    I dont like to do aythign extra... I think training if you train hard... and body weight excercises are doing me just fine.. but then again im no pro.
     
  14. VTJas81

    VTJas81 Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boston
    Hey I just made this today. They didn't have a medicine ball heavy enough so I bought a 50lb sandbag from lowes for 3.23 and two pillow cases at walmart for about 6 bucks. I wrapped it all up with duct tape. It also doubles as something to practice the top positions on and to focus your weight. Oh btw I do lift weights and do deadlifts as well.
     
  15. Stephan Kesting

    Stephan Kesting Green Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2002
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    213
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Dedicado - I trained a bit with Denis when he came through town on his way to fight Semenov in Pride, but he lives in Florida now, training with ATT.

    Stephan Kesting
    www.grapplearts.com
     
  16. funkgsus

    funkgsus Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    First, instead of a medicine ball, try using your heavy bag for 2 reasons, first it's alot heavier and second it almost simulats a person lying across you.
    Also to add a point, weight training is great but you also have to train flexibility in your work out.
    example, B4 and after you do a tri cept work out, strech your tricepts by reaching behind your back and the pushing down on your elbow with your other arm, if any one wants to know more about this, PM me cuz i just did some research on this and I'd wouldn't mind sharing what I learned
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.