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Strength & Conditioning for BJJ Part II

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by tf, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. tf

    tf Inside BJJ Podcast

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  2. thedoc56**

    thedoc56** Blue Belt

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    sweet. looks pretty intense
     
  3. fxpro888

    fxpro888 Guest

    i read this article and tried to understand all the exercises, but i must say, theyre kind of difficult in some cases. perhaps someone who likes this workout could do a youtube vid teaching and showing a sample S&C workout such as this.
     
  4. mtruitt76

    mtruitt76 Purple Belt

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    Good stuff. This isn't far off from what I was currently doing so I am glad to see that I stumbled into a routine that was close to what I needed to be doing.

    I will change my routine a bit and report back about my progress. It would be nice if we could get some people to try this template out for a while, keep a work out log, and report back about their progression.

    Appreciate the article Leo.
     
  5. muaythaitechniq

    muaythaitechniq Orange Belt

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    I tried posting this in the article, but it kept telling me there was an error.

    Very nice workout.

    I use a lot of the same exercises, but I mainly go heavy. I'll def. change to this and see how it goes. I had a few questions on the exercises:

    1. Squat Matrix, Y/T/I/L: I'm not familiar with what Y/T/I/L stand for or mean?
    2. Complexes: Any pros/cons using a Barbell?
     
  6. cooltoon999

    cooltoon999 Orange Belt

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    [​IMG]

    Teehee, nah i'm just trolling.

    In all seriousness this looks good as a BJJ specific S&C routine. If I could suggest one thing is that if your going to emphasize time as a factor in the routine, instead of doing 15 minutes of sprint work, why not just do a 4 minute Tabata run?

    For those that don't know its 8 rounds of 20 seconds MAXIMUM intensity and 10 seconds of absolute rest.

    Ex. Set treadmill at 10% incline, do 20 seconds at 7mph, 10 second stop, repeat 8 times.

    It only looks easy but by the end of it your going to feel destroyed. Not only that but it not only increases your aenorobic capacity, but studies have shown that it also increases your aerobic level better then that of doing a 60 minute run a couple times a week. It can also be applied to swimming,biking, pushups, air squats, pullups, whatever.

    All in all it's better then what I was expecting Leo, so I take my previous words back.
     
  7. Leo M

    Leo M Guest

    No reason to lighten the load if you don't want to. The rep ranges are a bit higher because I assume there may be a lot of athletes who are not accustomed to going heavier with lower rep ranges.

    1. Y/T/I/L refers to a warmup for the shoulder. It's typically done prone on an incline or flat bench or even stability ball. I'll see if I can find a video and post it.
    2. I have no emotional attachment to KB or DB for the complex. Alwyn Cosgrove and Dan John have some great Barbell Complexes and you'd do great to follow them.


    Leo
     
  8. Leo M

    Leo M Guest

    A couple points of agreement/ disagreement:

    I think the Tabata protocol is very efficient and effective for a fighter in phenomenal shape about to peak. However, in the original study, the subjects hit 170% of their VO2 Max during the work periods. That's a bit much for me to suggest to athletes who are even used to training "hard". IMO, the Tabata should be used at some point, but the athlete must be progressed to it. We have definitely put fighters through a few 4-5 minute rounds of it on the Airdyne, and you are right, it literally destroys you.

    Related to the 170% of the VO2 max, you can use a 20:10 work to rest ratio in anything, but you will not hit that threshold unless you are on a spinning bike, airdyne, versa climber or some other similar device. Front Squats in a 20:10 ratio are torturous, don't get me wrong, but it's not a Tabata unless you are approaching that 170% threshold.

    For the average athlete, even in shape, I like the 15-30 minute training session to build work capacity. I think it's less mentally taxing, less taxing on the CNS, and a better "general" plan. For peaking, I agree that you need to progress beyond that.

    Leo
     
  9. fourfif**

    fourfif** Banned Banned

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    I did a 6min kettlebell tabatas routine when I absolutely wasn't ready. It kicked my ass pretty bad.
     
  10. Luther

    Luther Green Belt

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    Very good article. I was really looking for a "basic, simple, not easy" S&C program and I'm going to follow Leo instruction.

    Thanks for sharing and looking forward to your next article.
     
  11. Legend Killer

    Legend Killer Yellow Belt

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    Wondering if you happened to have found a video for this? Or possibly just explain it? The program looks very solid. :D
     
  12. muaythaitechniq

    muaythaitechniq Orange Belt

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    Thanks for the response. Regarding the "squat matrix" is that any form of squat; front, rear, air, etc?

    I found the Y/T/I, but I'm sure I can figure out the L.

     
  13. shouldercharge

    shouldercharge Dave Camarillo idoliser

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    awesome thanks alot.
     
  14. KILL KILL

    KILL KILL Gold Belt

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    That's a good foundation for a program.
     
  15. wOg

    wOg Burien Top Team

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    This is exactly what I'm missing in the current wave of discussion on S&C for jiu jitsu. What in this routine "looks good as a BJ specific S&C routine"?

    The author of the protocol points out that "This is a basic template that I start with for most of my athletes". What I'm curious about is a program that specifically looks at the needs of jiu jitsu athletes apart from other athletes.

    I'm not trying to be critical of this protocol. But the evolution of athleticism in jiu jitsu will come most quickly through an analysis that looks specifically at the needs of jiu jitsu athletes, with a focus on what is DIFFERENT from the what other athletes need, rather than on what is similar.

    One area that does concern me about the protocol is the apparent de-emphasis on aerobic conditioning in favor of more anaerobic, high-intensity methods. In my experience - and in the literature I've read on conditioning and combat sports in general - a higher role for aerobic conditioning is a good idea for the vast majority of those training combat sports in general, and jiu jitsu in specific.
     
  16. Leo M

    Leo M Guest

    Thanks for your comments. In my first article, what I tried to emphasize was that I don't think from a strength perspective, BJJ/ MMA is all that different from other sports, save for a few exceptions (such as perhaps more movements done in a prone or supine position).

    This week, Mike Boyle wrote a piece with a similar overtone:

    MMA for Football? Michael Boyle’s Strengthcoach.com Blog

    I also tried to make a distinction with regards to the conditioning. In the second article, I tried to address the conditioning aspect through the use of BB/DB/KB complexes because it imposes an external muscular demand not captured through traditional agility or sprint work. Of course, I still believe sprint work is important, hence the inclusion of the Interval protocol. What you did not find in my program were shuttle runs, tempo runs, or lots of 400m or 200m sprints. Not that those options would be bad, but my feeling is the complexes and Interval work are more conducive to the demands of our sport.

    As I hope I've been very clear through this point, I also don't necessarily believe I'm 100% right, and I'm not suggesting I've found the holy grail of combat sports S&C - but personally, I have achieved better sucess through this approach than other approaches.

    As far as including more aerobic work, I still remain torn. I know coaches like Jon Chaimberg that do little to no traditional work, and I know other coaches like Joel Jamieson and Larry Lindenman advocate a decent amount of LSD. But from a coaching perspective, I like the anaerobic protocols better - frankly, it's harder to fake it, and I think builds more mental toughness. Please recall I'm writing this article for a very broad audience. Honestly, when is the last time you went to a commercial gym or college track and noted to yourself, "God, all these people just love sprinting/ working so hard!".

    Leo
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2010
  17. Leo M

    Leo M Guest

    The "L" is formed by putting your hands straight out to the side, and then bending 90 degrees at the elbow. Just a different stress.

    I can't find a video of the squat matrix exactly how we do it, so I'll attempt to describe it here. It's a four part movement.

    Start standing tall with your arms straight above your head, and your stance a little more than shoulder width apart, your feet slightly externally rotated.

    1. Perform a standard toe touch. This will be one of the few times you are ever supposed to flex at the lumbar spine, rather than hinge at the hips. Grab your toes.
    2. Still holding your toes, drop your butt to the ground as low as you can. Your back is till in flexion.
    3. While still crouching, bring your arms above your head and form a "Y" like that hideous 70's song. Make an effort to keep your chest high, and take the flexion out of your back. The goal here is to achieve the position of an overhead squat, with out the actual bar.
    4. Ascend as you would with a normal squat, chest high, back remaining lordotic/ neutral.

    Perform this for the recommended sets/ reps.

    Does this help, at all?

    Leo
     
  18. ZenMojo

    ZenMojo White Belt

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    Leo - liking your openness to discussion. Thanks for sharing what you are learning and posting to help us understand the details of what you are talking about.

    I have a follow up question (that you may intend to cover later already) - I'd like your opinion on "rest and recovery." What I see with many BJJ athletes wanting to take it to the next level is to essentially "hit the mats and roll hard until you can't roll anymore."

    This approach works on technique and endurance and the skills that are harder to train/teach in any other format (such as timing and pressure). But I see a lot of injuries and burnout - and I can't help but think there must be some protocols that can maximize our mat time and training time in total (as most of the athletes at this stage have other life commitments and BJJ has to come on top of that).

    Thanks for any thoughts.

    Peace,
    Zen Mojo
    zenmojobjj.blogspot.com/

    ____
    Get your grips, use your shoulder for pressure and whisper something dirty to the mat as you pass...
     
  19. Belatucadros

    Belatucadros Brown Belt

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  20. Leo M

    Leo M Guest

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