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Step in + punch.

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by MTnewbie, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. MTnewbie

    MTnewbie Yellow Belt

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    I dont know what youd call it in english, but Im talking about that little step you sometimes do to get in range and then fire of a punch at the same time.

    How do you do this, and why?

    Jab; I take a step forward only with my front foot, and the just after the punch follow up with my back foot. If I do a 1-2 ill punch the back hand straight as i move my foot forward (which ofcourse will result in a weak right).

    Right; when strating of with a right i basically jump in with both feet at the same time (and keep my stance) fire of the righjt while in "the air".

    Front hook; i do something similar to when i do the right, i jump in with somewhat a rotation in the air and hit with my left hook as I land. Ive seen several old school boxers do this move, it looks powerful but feels slow.

    How do you do this? This is MT fights so I do use 10oz gloves and Im not fighting a super fast boxer :). Any input is apreciated.

    Btw what about crossing your feet (ie changing stance) to get in range? Ive seen a lot of Russian amateur boxers do this, just seems wrong to me.
     
  2. Im not sure exactly what you are asking, it seems you are doing the step in punches good. And about crossing the feet, it confuses people sometimes, so some guys use it. Might I ask for a slightly different or more obvious question to answer?
     
  3. Vovchanchyn Fan

    Vovchanchyn Fan Green Belt

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    Crossing the feet is considered a no-no in western boxing b/c you can't effectively strike back when your feet are crossed, and additionally, a quick push kick (MT rules) and you're likely to go down.

    I've never seen Kosta Tsu cross his feet and he was brought up in the russian boxing system, so he must have figured out its not a very smart thing to do against a good opponent.
     
  4. MTnewbie

    MTnewbie Yellow Belt

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    Aight, thanks.

    It seems there is not a better/worse way of doing this, whatever works for me works.. so to speak.
    The only thing im still debating now is if i should step in+jab as i described in the post or if I should pratice jumping in and jab keeping the same stance.
     
  5. OpethDrums

    OpethDrums Banned Banned

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    first off: move first, then throw your punch or combo

    second: your technique gives you no stability or power










    get out of my sight
     
  6. OpethDrums

    OpethDrums Banned Banned

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    where is kabuki.. tell him out to throw a jab and a right.
     
  7. Madmick

    Madmick Cerebrage Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    The bottom line is to not be punching when either of your feet is in the air. Even if you jump in, you don't throw the punch until your feet make contact. You wanna time it and make it as quick as possible, but the bottom line is that you can't generate any power with your legs if your feet are off the ground.
     
  8. Madmick

    Madmick Cerebrage Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Yeah, crossing the feet destroys your balance. You have to shift in, shift out.

    Some guys cross their feet when they "dance", but I rarely see guys dance in range. Usually, they seem to throw on the quick change of stance to unsettle their opponent and make quick opportunity of an angle.
     

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