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Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by IFLUX23, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. IFLUX23

    IFLUX23 Purple Belt

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    In boxing, you usually have your elbows closer to your body. In Muay Thai, you usually have your elbows a bit further from your body.

    What purpose does this have? I know in Muay Thai they throw elbows and that might be the reason, but there has the be reason why boxing requires you to keep your elbows closer to your body.
     
  2. FadeIntoViolenc

    FadeIntoViolenc Orange Belt

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    Most kickboxers use a higher guard because of the danger of headkicks that can come out of nowhere.
     
  3. hughes fan

    hughes fan Silver Belt

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    ^ Pretty much this. I tried using a boxing stance, whilst sparring, against a kickboxer who only strikes above the waist and he landed two heavy head kicks in quick succession because I couldn't get my hands up in time. I found it easier when I switched and made my guard higher and further from my face.
     
  4. Payak

    Payak Brown Belt Professional Fighter

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    a kick from your opponent can hit your elbow and your elbow hits your ribs, thats the reason.
     
  5. IFLUX23

    IFLUX23 Purple Belt

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    Wait, so Boxer's way of putting elbows closer to the body is basically useless? Is there any advantage in doing it?
     
  6. Bluesbreaker

    Bluesbreaker Black Belt

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    The punching techniques aren't exactly the same either. A boxing stance is also better for a boxer to attack.
     
  7. IFLUX23

    IFLUX23 Purple Belt

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    I see.


    Well the situation is this. I actually wanted to do Muay Thai and BJJ cuz I wanted to be a Mixed Martial Artist, but there was no such club in my college, so I ended up in Boxing Club.

    My Boxing Club guys tells me to keep my elbows closer to my body, but if it doesn't serve much purpose other than it's good for boxers only, then should I reconsider?
     
  8. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Well think about it. These are both pragmatic fighting forms. As such the tactics, defenses, and stances will develop based on results.

    Each fighting form has unique factors that must be considered. With boxing many of the standard defenses and body movements can get you ktfo in a muay thai match, and a muay thai stance and tactic is likely to get you a high punch count...on your own face and body.

    So there isn't a single reason persay. The kickboxing guard has to deal with more than just punches, and as such the stance and guard are meant to deal with that. To be completely realistic about it, most folks don't keep their arms in a single static position, and I've seen Thai fighters keep more of a boxing guard and others more of a traditional wide Thai guard.

    In the end if it works for YOU then it doesn't matter what anyone else does.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010
  9. Boxer123

    Boxer123 Guest

    Also having your elbows pointed slightly away from your body makes sort of a "ramp" for highkicks, instead of a high kick slamming into you and you take all the impact, the somewhat flared elbows make a triangle and the highkick can slide up/over with less impact.
     
  10. Cannon_6

    Cannon_6 Green Belt

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    No, do what they say. At the boxing club, you're only facing boxers. They will destroy your midsection if you don't protect it.

    That is, unless you enjoy the smell and taste of canvas...:)
     
  11. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Humor me for a second...what are the defenses for a body punch or [round] kick?
     
  12. Boxer123

    Boxer123 Guest

    Check the round kick, catch the kick, counter with a teep etc..

    Not sure why you are trying to be arrogant. I don't advise it though.
     
  13. IFLUX23

    IFLUX23 Purple Belt

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    Oh okay, thanks guys.
     
  14. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Don't misunderstand, it's not arrogance. I don't advise you assume as such.

    You're saying that the arm is not held as close and is angled to serve as a ramp, and that you don't keep the arm tight to the body? In my experience I've known the opposite to be true...

    When you take a kick to the head / neck area, you use your arm as a cover by tucking it tight to the head or avoid altogether by leaning.

    When you take a kick to the upper body, you tuck your arm tight to your body to absorb as you step away, you avoid altogether with footwork, you intercept, or you catch.

    When you take a kick to the lower body and below, the same can be done as listed just above but you can add in the check with the knee / shin as an option.

    So again, the point of me asking isn't to sound arrogant, is to illustrate that tucking the arm close to the body is a standard way of protecting any impact to the body. Boxing and Muay Thai both use it. So the idea that there is some absolute that it's got to be one way or the other simply isn't true.
     
  15. Smw

    Smw Purple Belt

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    Vankuen

    What is the proper way to catch a body kick, or leg kick for that matter?

    For head kicks I have been blocking with one forearm then looping my other hand under the leg, is this proper technique?
     
  16. Boxer123

    Boxer123 Guest

    It's just one style, I never said it's the ONLY way to do it, everyone fights differently. More western fighters keep there elbows tucked and glued to their body, but then watch guys like Changpuek and tell me he fights like that, hands are WAY up elbows flared wayyy out, it's more of a east vs west type of thing IMO. I was trained traditional style and alot of the time I keep my arms higher and elbows out a bit more, but that is just me. Also when someone throws a high kick/neck kick, I lift up with my elbow when their leg is on top of my guard and it makes them fall on their ass.
     
  17. Boxer123

    Boxer123 Guest

    Catching low kicks can be dangerous, unless you want to catch it at the same time as you throw your straight, that is effective but mostly I like to just check it or step in with a straight as they throw their low kick, if they have a lazy guard they will get tagged. For the body kick step away from the power of it while scooping the leg and grip around their achilles so you have a nice tight lock in on the leg and then secure it and crank it up wards.

    (I know you asked Vankuen but figured i'd chime in), hope that helps.
     
  18. Smw

    Smw Purple Belt

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    Yeah thanks for advice.

    I rarely try to catch the low kick, if it connects higher on my leg sometimes I will try to quickly grab it, while watching for the right hand. This probably is a good way to get faked, or set up for a big head shot the more I think about it.
     
  19. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Well...from my experience...catching a body kick isn't something you "plan" to do, it's something that happens. If it happens, you're stepping away from the kick and catching typically with a wrapping type grip (as opposed to under grab). Most folks grab near the ankle and make sure to grind the radial bone into the achilles tendon. Others end up catching around the calf area or higher because they've stepped in with the catch. The short answer though--is step away as you catch, then counter punch, kick, or sweep. Don't grab leg kicks...just my advice.

    The method you describe for catching head kicks is one that I've learned, but don't use often because I personally don't like tying up both my arms for the time it takes to do it. Head kicks I generally just lean away and counter kick or punch. You can use a traditional thai cover and move in as well as one tactic, but if you're just taking it--again you want to move away as the kick makes contact. After the initial blow is dissipated you can scoop under and counter or push away as a pretty safe maneuver.

    As another option, I'll step away enough to dissolve any real force while also using a cross (hand) check as I scoop under with the same side hand at nearly the same time.

    Yet another option I learned a looong time ago was where I stepped in and drove my elbow into the thigh just above the knee of the kicking leg, and then going into a scoop with the other arm or entering clinch range or whatever...

    Like Josh said, different strokes for different folks.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2010
  20. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    No worries. It wasn't a jab or anything personal, just got me thinking was all. I was trained in the traditional way as well, and know what you're talking about. It was the theme of the thread that was trying to make everything black and white, which you and I know it is not.
     

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