So had my first BJJ training last saturday

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Straightcross, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. Straightcross

    Straightcross Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    (Continuation of http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f12/want-transition-boxing-grappling-art-2351479/ )

    I got submitted 6 times and whenever I got into a good position and had control of his leg or arm I had no idea what to do. One time I tried a rear naked choke but just ended up giving away my back. Was up against 3 different partners, got submitted by a guy who only trained 2 months which was kind of discouraging

    Before we sparred we did a sweep drill (Put foot on partner's hip, let yourself fall, put your foot behind his ankle and pull other foot away) that went absolutely terrible. At times I thought during the explanation that this is way too technical for me and I should just go back to boxing but the sparring really changed my mind I really enjoyed that even though I got dominated. What those drills taught me is that I should really use my hips more since I have never did any grappling before.

    Since I'm physically strong from lifting I could still give some opposition during sparring but at the end my arms were toast

    I also liked the atmosphere, it was a lot less hostile than at a boxing gym and the people were really friendly and even though I got owned I didn't go home with a sore jaw or a headache and there were no guys trying to prove how tough they are,

    1.Any beginner tips? Should I watch youtube videos or will those just lead me to try things I'm not ready for?

    2.How important is the quality of a Gi? was thinking of getting a cheap one since i also want to get ear guards and a crotch protector

    3.Do your fingers get used to it fast? my fingers were pretty sore from all the gi pulling

    4.How much otraining before I will be actually able to fight back instead of only postponing the inevitable? I know this varies from person to person and from gym to gym but a general estimate would be nice.

    In conclusion I liked it, I'm not loving it yet but I'm not going to give up on it either, it seems to be a much healthier choice than boxing although I don't see how BJJ would help with self defense against more than opponent, then again that is not the reason I'm training
     
  2. HellSent

    HellSent Brown Belt

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    1. Just have fun and as for watching videos go for it. Learning is what it is all about.

    2. Get a cheap gi like a Fuji, it's good for a starter gi. Get a Jaco cup and compression shorts. I like them and dislike Shock Doctor as I am always adjusting that damn cup.

    3. Never noticed my fingers hurting from gi pulling.

    4. Don't worry about that shit man. It will come. keep in mind you are new and this is not something you are going to pick up in a few days or weeks. New guys will come and go and you can practice on them what you have learned from getting beat up. Eventually when you have learned enough you will defend yourself better from higher skilled people.
     
  3. sourdiesel209

    sourdiesel209 Green Belt

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    man I also switched from boxing to bjj 2 weeks ago.. Its been a blast so far

    I know that feeling of not understanding shit of the drill thats being shown in class, but try to check out all the little details, you will get it eventually..

    watch videos sometimes if you didnt get the technique right in class, but try to keep it simple

    bjj matches are suddenly way more exciting when you understand whats going on..
     
  4. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    I'd stay away from youtube until you have a solid base and can actually tell what it good or bad technique there. It's going to take some patience. You need to be less worried about 'winning' during sparring. Every 'lose' is something that you should be learning. It's a lesson.

    It's important simply from the stand point of not having it wear out on you. Now, it's not super important at the beginning. You'll either be into it and want to replace your crappy gi or you'll not be into it and you'll have saved some money.

    It shouldn't take too long. Maybe a month or two.

    It really depends on the person, but I usually say that it would take 6 months to a year before you have enough of a base of technique to actually have something useful to do from each position you'll find yourself in.

    Get through the first 6 months and then you'll start feel more comfortable. I'm not saying you're going to be beating on people. I've done this nearly 5 years and it still doesn't come completely naturally to me all the time. I mean, I'm no where near a black belt.
     
  5. JohnJameson

    JohnJameson Yellow Belt

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    1. watching videos won't hurt. learn some basic sweeps/submissions and try them out when you roll. if you can't get them, ask an instructor what you're doing wrong. i'm also pretty new (about 2 months) and notice that i learn the most by just asking what i should have done under whatever circumstances i get into.

    2. just get a cheap gi like fuji, or mmaoutlet core gi to start.

    3. mine did a little bit in the beginning. maybe 2-3 sessions. i guess you just get used to it and they don't get sore anymore.

    4. depends on your partner really. i just try to survive with the higher belts, maybe try a submission if it's there. then use people closer to my skill level to work my offense.
     
  6. esteven

    esteven Blue Belt

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    1. If you DO decide to watch technique videos online, you'll get way more mileage out videos of the techniques you've already learned, or are working on in class.

    2. The quality will matter some, but don't confuse that with price. You can get all the gi you need for $60-$80. However, my first gi was really cheap, and it fit terribly and the texture was uncomfortable; it did get a bit distracting. So, I'd recommend a low-end gi from a reputable brand (like most here, I highly recommend Fuji).

    3. Not to worry; they do!

    4. Let's take a look at this:

    That should shed some light on the matter! Don't look at it as discouraging that people with little experience are beating you. Take it as an indication of how quickly people improve at the beginning stages of training! If you train often, your progress will be pretty rapid at first. It's just a matter of putting in the repetitions, and applying what you're learning in your rolling sessions (or trying to, anyway).
     
  7. Protectandserve

    Protectandserve Red Belt

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    1. Pick up a good comprehensive beginner DVD. Roy Dean has some great ones, or any of the Gracie Barra Fundamentals DVD's. Also Stephan Kesting has some great DVD's that allow you to focus on a specific area of your game, as you develop it. Learning submissions without the proper set ups will hamper your overall game.

    2. Get a decent basic one. If you get a cheap one, it will be uncomfortable and fall apart.

    3. Yes

    4. Usually a couple months, depending on who you are sparring against. Biggest thing is learn positioning and defense. Once you get those somewhat set, you can work on your offense.

    And lastly, enjoy your journey.
     
  8. cms9690

    cms9690 Green Belt

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    Welcome to the community, I hope you keep up with your training.


    I got submitted 6 times
    Try not to count how many times you're submitted or how many times you submit others.

    ..and whenever I got into a good position and had control of his leg or arm I had no idea what to do.
    That's okay, I felt the same way my first time.

    got submitted by a guy who only trained 2 months which was kind of discouraging
    It's not like boxing where anyone can run in there and just hit, there is loads more technical knowledge to entry level grappling compared to entry level striking (granted, at a high level, striking is VERY technical).


    Since I'm physically strong from lifting I could still give some opposition during sparring but at the end my arms were toast
    Try not to do this, it won't allow you to get any better at grappling.

    I also liked the atmosphere, it was a lot less hostile than at a boxing gym and the people were really friendly and even though I got owned I didn't go home with a sore jaw or a headache and there were no guys trying to prove how tough they are,
    Amazing, isn't it? I come from the same background and it was almost unbelievable how relaxed and ego-less people can be.

    1.Any beginner tips? Should I watch youtube videos or will those just lead me to try things I'm not ready for?
    Try to understand the positional hierarchy and then work transitions.


    4.How much otraining before I will be actually able to fight back instead of only postponing the inevitable? I know this varies from person to person and from gym to gym but a general estimate would be nice.
    Depends on how good/bad your partner is and how willing they are to "let" you get an upperhand.
     
  9. RhinoUP

    RhinoUP Orange Belt

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    Just keep training. It does get better. Take pleasure in the small successes/sweep/guard pass/escape from bad position. It helps deal with the fact that you are probably gonna get smashed most of the time.

    It's a long journey. Enjoy the ride.
     
  10. Straightcross

    Straightcross Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    Also is it normal for your knees to be really sore? mine hurt a lot when I touch them now from all that sparring on the knees
     
  11. devnull

    devnull Orange Belt

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    The more you go the more you will become acclimated to the different moves and positions and comfortable rolling. Also this is the stage to try different things like fighting from your back instead of being on top all the time for example. Feel yourself out and have fun.
     
  12. Nozza

    Nozza Purple Belt

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    Your fingers are likely sore because you were gripping as if your life depended on it. I still overgrip a few months into it.

    I've never had knee soreness but I guess if you're not used to being on your knees that much it might make then tender the first few times out.

    I'd recommend buying the Jiu Jitsu University book by and studying the first chapter on survival. It's enormously helpful and will quickly make it harder for more experienced guys to submit you. E.g. just being in the recommended mount survival posture when you've been mounted will seriously frustrate a white belt with a few months experience.
     
  13. HEAVY GRAPPLER

    HEAVY GRAPPLER Brown Belt

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    This is some pretty good advice if you insist on getting supplemental material. But stick to the first chapter for now.

    Something else i recommend is asking an instructor or higher belt to explain what the positions are and what your basic objectives are in each one. For example "You are inside my guard. You don't have (m)any submission opportunities here. You need to work to get past my legs." Left to your own devices, you would figure this all out in a month or so, but it can be explained quickly.

    Otherwise, as a few people have said - just relax, don't worry about winning and try to use the actual techniques you are learning in class.
     
  14. kupop18

    kupop18 Orange Belt

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    First time I rolled, my knees hurt alot. I invested in some knee pads and never hurt anymore. FYI get volleyball type knee pads.
     
  15. AldoGenkiSudo

    AldoGenkiSudo Blue Belt

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    My knees hurt a bunch after my first class the other day. I just took it as a sign that the pads aren't as soft as I thought they were going to be, and I should probably slow down.
     
  16. DaGenius

    DaGenius Silver Belt

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    Ah memories of first class. Good luck dude. As a big strong guy you have a big advantage in bjj. As you continue to learn basics you will be tougher and tougher to tap. I almost believe your first gi should be cheap. Wait til you've been training before you get a "fancy" gi. Fuji, badboy basic etc for starters

    I still wear knee pads under my gi. Helps a lot. I also always wear my headgear when rolling. I don't care how dorky I look, my ears look great and that's essential for me. ;)

    Worry about basics and survival when you start. YouTube is fine but you probably want to stick to what your teacher and higher belts teach you in the beginning.

    I came from a striking art as well. Bjj is a great grappling base. No matter how tough the first day might have been after a few months you will have the beginning of a good grappling base to go with your striking. Not that you want to fight for the ufc bur trust me it feels good to have some legit training in both.
     
  17. Hendo89

    Hendo89 Purple Belt

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    1. Although you may be stronger than most, nobody is stronger than Jiu Jitsu. Thats sounds douche like and it is but the message is dont technique. Even if it doesnt work a few times but your technique looks good, keep at it. Its like if someone came in to boxing with biceps and thought that would help them beat floyd. Biceps do help but they help you beat people that arent that good.

    So my real tip is drop the lifting and pickup shrimping.

    2. Not very, you would rather 2 cheap ones than one good one because you can train more!!

    3.No. Sadly no. Its the worst thing for me. 1 fracture, 2 dislocations, many jarrings. My hands looks like I was a bad poker player and owed people money who claimed said money with a hammer.

    4. Against who? (No serious!)

    The question I ask myself is would I be able to beat me from x time ago, but in relation to your teacher? You almost certainly will never be better because he will get better aswell so unless there is time off or an age gap etc its hard. They got on the escalator first, just dont get off.

    However against someone woth no BJJ?

    Im an 85kg 3 year white belt and I can tap most new people regardless of size (Unless 400lb plus like in that thread/photo) starting from bottom side control in a 3 minute round.

    Also stop counting how many times you are submitted, it will make you take less chances and learn less.
     
  18. Linthec

    Linthec Orange Belt

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    You really shouldn't be leaning on your knees, and it's because you don't have good posture and stance and that's something you'll learn.
     

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