shogun punch

salboski

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just watched the shogun nogueira fight for the third time and i noticed a strange punch from shogun. it starts out like an overhand right but then twists at the end and his wrist bends sideways. i looked at it and tried to replicate it on thai pads but couldn't. he throws this punch alot anybody know what it is
 
Maybe he is just turning over his punch? Is he putting his hip into it? The theory is that turning over your punch adds power. Ken Shamrock said he trains to turn over his punches. Bas however says this is overrated when it comes to power and doesn't. Take a look at the thread on turning over punches. If this is not what your talking about disregard.
 
the thing that has me curious is that no one else at shootboxe throws this type of punch it must be destinctly his own
 
PariahCarey said:
Bas however says this is overrated when it comes to power and doesn't.

Now see, as huge of a Bas Rutten fan I am, and as much as a lot of his system works for me, here's one of the few areas I disagree with him in.

I own pretty much every piece of media made by Bas Rutten save the Extreme Pancrase series and the Lethal Streetfighting DVD. And in his DVDs, he tries to explain that when you rotate your fist, your elbow lifts up, and telegraphs the punch. Also, he shows that when you rotate your fist, it makes your punch more like a backfist.

Here's where I think Bas misunderstands this concept. The turning over your fist thing mainly comes from boxing. And a good boxing coach, or a good boxing book, will tell you that you rotate your fist at the END of your punch. Your hand (not your fist; it should be unclenched until right before the moment of impact) remains vertical and relaxed, and right before the moment of impact, your fist clenches and rotates. This adds a snapping/whipping effect to the punch, and helps you return your punch quickly. That's the entire purpose of rotating your fist. It travels like a vertical punch, and rotates just before it hits.
 
Iceman5592 said:
The turning over your fist thing mainly comes from boxing. And a good boxing coach, or a good boxing book, will tell you that you rotate your fist at the END of your punch. Your hand (not your fist; it should be unclenched until right before the moment of impact) remains vertical and relaxed, and right before the moment of impact, your fist clenches and rotates. This adds a snapping/whipping effect to the punch, and helps you return your punch quickly. That's the entire purpose of rotating your fist. It travels like a vertical punch, and rotates just before it hits.

I agree. Plus, rotating the fist at the end of the punch just has a natural "feel" to it.

However, with respect to hooks, I find that it "feels" more natural and that I can generate more power if I keep the fist vertical. My old boxing coach though preferred rotating through the hook so that the fist is perpendicular (which seems to be the more common style). Any comments on this?
 
Boxer Rebellion said:
I agree. Plus, rotating the fist at the end of the punch just has a natural "feel" to it.

However, with respect to hooks, I find that it "feels" more natural and that I can generate more power if I keep the fist vertical. My old boxing coach though preferred rotating through the hook so that the fist is perpendicular (which seems to be the more common style). Any comments on this?

I don't like to rotate my hooks. I agree that doing it for straight punches does have a natural feel.

Bas always says to keep an open mind. And i'm sure that would apply to his system as well.

Sometimes people just develop awkward or unorthodox styles. Look at the pitcher Dontrell Willis. Thats a crazy wind-up he's got, some people would tell him he's wasting energy but it works for him. Even Chuck's looping punches are kind of unorthodox.
 

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