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setting up a double leg

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by fastbalej, May 4, 2008.

  1. fastbalej Yellow Belt

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    whatsup im not a wrestler so my takedowns arnt the greatest yet, im been doin bjj for 7 months.. im tryin to find some drills to work on to setup a takedown with punches.. everytime i shoot in i feel like the takedown sucks if its mma.. bjj i can do a lil better.. any opinions?
     
  2. SMillard Red Belt

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    Get BJ Penns book, it covers set up for double legs and has a section on incorporating striking setups for take downs.

    I'd also check for high school wrestling camps that might be going on over the summer. Depending on your situation and what time they have them you can get some good instruction from there. I'd also see if there is a high school team you can hook up with, talk to the coach and explain your situation and offer to help with the kids. That is what I do with a private school and it has helped me tremendously and guess what, it's free.
     
  3. GOCANES751** Banned Banned

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    Great book. I purchased it about two weeks ago. BJ displays a couple of different ways of setting up the double take down.
     
  4. bjjWANNABE152** Yellow Belt

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    for straight grappling...you need to circle away. if youre a right leg lead circle right so his right leg steps to you. opposite applies. What i like to do is circle with a double tricep tie and then push in when he pushes back i snap and then shoot. its a give and take. another good one is a throwby. he ties up with his right hand you grap the albow and push it across your body and shot.
     
  5. txfighter13 Purple Belt

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    Stance Legs should be shoulder width with the legs stagered. Your nose, knee and foot should all be in a veritical line. Keep your elbows all the way in as if you escaping the mount.

    Elevation change Before you shoot in it is crucial to lower elevation so you are on the same level to take the legs. If you just try to grab the legs it won't work.

    Penetration step The keys in to step between the legs as deep as possible and drive you opponent backwards. From here you can grab both of the legs.

    I would suggest either hooking the leg, lifting your opponent, or driving your opponent sideways at a 90 degree angle. But that is another discussion this just how to set it up. Hope this helps.
     
  6. Tony Manifold Brown Belt

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    Obviously, work your shot as much as you can. The better your shot, the less important the setup is. One simple set up is to jab then shoot. I think the first set up I ever learned was to tap the head and shoot. It is essentially the same move. Another one that is popular is to throw an overhand right (or left if you are left handed) then follow through to the take down. Guys with strong wrestling background like this because it lets them get their right foot forward and most guys wrestle right foot forward and fight left foot forward. A third option is to time a level change with your opponents overhand right. As he commits with the rear hand, he will open himself up for the take down. Those three should get you going. I would also recommend Randy Coutures wrestling for fighting. Great wrestling for MMA book.
     
  7. PhillyD45 Orange Belt

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    I agree with Tony Manifold.
    Flick your fingers towards your opponents eyes or tap the nose. Get your opponent to blink.
    Instantaneously shoot in. Step in deep with your foot outside his base. Shoot in lower than his hips if possible. Wrap up his thighs and "snap" them outside while driving your shoulder into his hips. Pull, complete your shoot and either lift hi off the mat for a huge double leg (Koscek style) or continue your shot "through" his hips and drive him to the mat.

    The only problem is that it's not the easiest thing to do.
     
  8. SMillard Red Belt

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    be careful with the finger flick, we taught it and two kids inadvertently poked their opponents in the eyes and were disqualified. Judge the distance you don't need to be right in his face when doing it, I'd recommend keeping the flick at least 6" from the face in case he steps into it. The head slap recommended by Tony is much more practical especially if you "hit" the top of the head or crown area and push the head down, while your opponent is pulling his head back and sometimes moving his torso in the process it leaves him open for a shot. As previously mentioned always do it with the opposite hand to your lead or you will be open to a Russian armbar.
     
  9. Cipote We Jam Econo

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    I'd say that's the best option..sure it's not as flashy, but less energy is wasted and it gets the job done
     
  10. Tony Manifold Brown Belt

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    For MMA, don't bother with a head tap or finger flick. Use a jab. A nice jab right in the beak is the perfect setup for a double. His hands will rise, opening his lower body to attack, and if you pop him, he will pull his head back which will push his hips forward allowing you to get the double easier. The trick is finding the balance between a hard jab and laying off it enough that you can quickly transition to the double. Most people either throw too stiff a jab or don't sell it enough.
     

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