Round kick, getting up on toes help

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by dwas, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. dwas

    dwas White Belt

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    For kickboxing and muay thai, this seems to be the one thing about the kick that troubles me the most. I used to train shotokan karate, and kicks would always have the supporting leg flat footed and firmly rooted during the kick. It's been ingrained in my muscle memory for any kind of kick and now it's messing me up during my round kicks in kickboxing and muay thai. What tricks, drills can I use to help me get up on the toes for better rotation?
     
  2. SuperKenMasters

    SuperKenMasters White Belt

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    Some gyms in thailand put chalk on your heels, and if you leave a white mark then they beat you with a stick :)
     
  3. Henry Huggins

    Henry Huggins Green Belt

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    practice more?
     
  4. generalyum

    generalyum Green Belt

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    Really? I've never heard of that. Sounds intense haha
     
  5. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    This could help you. I'm a big fan of this drill. It's designed to help teach you how to power the kick with your hips, but it emphasizes rotation of the standing foot as well. It's best done, imo, when you point your supporting foot's heel at the target. Even if you don't kick that way, and you don't have to, emphasizing that pivot for the drill could help you.



    Watch the whole video by the way. The actual drill in question isn't shown right at the beginning--that's something else, although that could be useful as well. :wink:
     
  6. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    I use the first drill shown to increase hip flexibility and pivot, but the leg that's being held should be kept straight rather than bending your knee down like you do in a kick.

    I practice coming up on the toe by stepping up on a box. Step up on it, driving up on your toe at the top and pushing you opposite hip fwd. Step down then repeat with the opposite side. I use it for knees normally, but it should get you used to lifting your heel up. If you can get used to the two drills you should see results.


    The second part of the video I don't like. I use this time of kick to push people back into the corner, but its not how a normal kick should land. A normal kick should be fast and land with an impact not a push, his leg should be straighter also.
     
  7. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    Well, it's not to mimic a kick. It's to develop the sensation of using the hip in the kick. People who have bad kicks almost always cannot push a heavy bag or person away from them in this fashion, and that's because they're usually not recruiting their hip. It's just a drill, not a slowed down kick or anything. My first coach had us do it, and it was very helpful for me.
     
  8. PeterPain

    PeterPain Brown Belt

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    I tape my feet between knuckle of feet to before ankle.
    It does sort of a ballerina shoe so I can stand on toes.
    My feet have super huge arch or are spoon shaped.

    For trainning purpose maby but doing that all the time is terrible.
    A chopping downward calf kick or upward under the calf kick and you are on your ass.
     

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