Question to the coaches

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by shincheckin, Aug 19, 2018.

  1. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    I wanted to ask the coaches on the forum if they think this is an adequate fight camp for one of their fighters?

    5 rounds shadow boxing with 16oz gloves on
    2 rounds hitting pads (not with coach but with another fighter)
    2 rounds holding pads (fighter holding pads)
    2 rounds sparring (no clinch only rounds)

    I personally feel this is a poor fight camp, what are your thoughts on it?

    How are your fight camps done? I am interested in all coaches thoughts and opinions but would also like to tag @Sinister for this one.
     
  2. Frode Falch

    Frode Falch Gold Belt Professional Fighter

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    This is the whole session? How many times/days?

    Do the fighter do some solo training on his own?
     
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  3. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    just this, 5 days a week, thats the whole session.
     
  4. eternaldarkness

    eternaldarkness Brown Belt

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    I don't really see the merit in a fighter holding pads for someone else. Also not enough sparring for my liking. Mind you my thing is boxing and mma.
     
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  5. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    i agree with you 100%, i think its a poor fight camp. I dont feel fighters should be holding pads for eachother, thats fighters coaching eachother, but isnt coaching the job of the coach? and not enough sparring, and no time dedicated to clinch only.
     
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  6. right hand lead

    right hand lead Green Belt

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    im guessing this is for muaythai? It seems a lil soft to me.

    I never ran a camp for strict boxing or muay thai, but i have ran over 100 camps for mma fighters. That workout looks like a regular day in class to me

     
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  7. ARIZE

    ARIZE Blue Belt

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    Sounds poor even for a basic training session, not only for fight camp...
    And no clinching work?
     
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  8. William Huggins

    William Huggins Purple Belt

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    It seems a bit light to me........ Too little trainer input.

    In my younger years, it would be.

    6 days a week, 2 hours a day minimum, that would include full sparring (light), pad work with trainer and students not fighting, some shadow boxing, this would include a 15 minutes warm up, all cardio work would be done outside of gym time......so you would be expected to put in another hour a day of your own time doing road work etc.....once a week.....you would do Shark tank.......this was for ameture level.
     
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  9. Lucas Coradini

    Lucas Coradini Blue Belt Professional Fighter

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    Seems like the consensus that this is a very light workout, more suited maybe for a comercial class... For that case students holding pads for one another is a viable tool, I think. But since you're asking about a fight camp, yeah, that isn't optimal nor enough...

    With that being said I can't help myself but ask (knowing that you're very experienced and already knew the answer): why are you asking this? Not meant to be an ass, I'm honestly curious...

    Another question is: how coaches are supposed to learn how to hold pads in Thailand? Or in boxing? What is the optimal and expected way for it to happen?

    Ps: I learned it helping out training partners, having myself a fight to prepare or not. That was the way at most gyms I trained. Later on when I had my students even thought I didn't abolish having them hold pads for each other I always managed to have "free privates" holding pads for them.
     
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  10. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    I agree
     
  11. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    i agree
     
  12. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    I agree, sounds like a camp im much more used to.
     
  13. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    I agree

    I left a gym because I didnt feel I was being adequately prepared for my fights. reading that leaving gym threads got me thinking about it again, just wanted to double check to see if I was possibly over-reacting, or if the rest of the people would agree with me, seems everyone agrees.

    How are coaches supposed to learn? By holding pads of course. Thats the job of the coach, not the fighter. Why should fighters be learning to hold pads? A retired fighter turned coach sure. I can see your point, but my fight camp is not the time to learn to hold pads. Also myself and the fighters from the gym can all hold pads quite well, but thats the job of the coach, not the fighter. Pad holding is a form of coaching, so thats the fighters coaching eachother, coaching is the job of the coach.

    Thats good, the gym/coach I am speaking of only held pads for me twice, 2 weeks before a title fight, once 1 week, once the next. Its like ok if the coach isnt willing to work with me thats fine, but at least let me get some work in with the other fighters instead of shadowboxing all night which is what he bulk of the training consisted of. So I left as I felt I wasnt being adequately prepared for my fights and the coach didnt seem to have a problem with sending us to fight not well prepared. Just wanted to see if others would agree with my thoughts and actions.
     
  14. William Huggins

    William Huggins Purple Belt

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    A good coach watches you spar, makes comments, tries to plug holes in your game........... You are a representative of the gym, it's important that you are prepared as best they can....... To do anything else is stupid.
     
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  15. shincheckin

    shincheckin Brown Belt

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    exactly, a fighters performance is a direct reflection of his coach IMO. The only thing I can say is I know these guys have businesses to run, bills to pay, etc. so I understand why some gyms are run the way they are, fighters dont keep the lights on, the 99% of fitness enthusiasts etc. do.
     
  16. j123

    j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    too little imo

    and it depends on the fighters you're preparing, are they fresh green guys going onto their first event, or are these seasoned guys? Even on the latter it can depend if they came from a strong athletic background

    If the plan in the OP is going to stick, the intensity HAS to be there.

    Fresh guys NEED to have more repetition drilled in for it to become second nature, exp'd guys can get away with it, but even with that routine its looks low in volume. So basically for me, the newer the guy is, the more volume would be needed to prepare them.

    2 rounds sparring is too little too, unless you meant 2 good rounds and they had 3-5 warm-up rounds

    I'm by no means a full-time coach, but when I coached my teammate for his first event, it was a 10 week camp, each training day consisting of:

    -flow spar to get him used to flowing and throwing combinations
    -padwork - just 2 raw basic combinations since time isn't on our side
    -partner drills - it looks very sparring-like, but its drilling. Stuff like I'm on offense to him, and he has to block, evade, or counter with a combination. No mounting offense with this part until his go
    -clinch spar every training day, so about 15-20min at the end of each session
    -sparring class, usually 1-2x a week

    shadow boxing was 3-4 x 3min
    Bagwork was either 5x2min or tabata of 6 sets (30s work : 10s rest).

    These were done when he was training with me, that meant when grappling / BJJ classes were running we'd be doing this. Some days he took the class then we worked after, or vice versa

    partner drills and pads changed depending on his progress, and we'd revisit things often so he wouldn't end up forgetting if he got used to drilling certain methods. It happened early on so I had this done.
    Then 2 times during mid of camp, I had him engage in hard sparring and came in early to make a "mock" fight so he would get a small taste of what it felt like going into the event.

    all rounds of everything (spar, pads, bag, etc) were 2min because his fight would be 2min rounds. I had the mistake of training with MMA guys before for my MT fights, and my body got adjusted to 5min rounds vs 2min and it shocked me a bit, hence why I had him on the same duration and intensity his fight would bring.
     
  17. Frode Falch

    Frode Falch Gold Belt Professional Fighter

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    A fighter should focus on sharpen his weapons and building up his stamina.

    Learning how to hold pads are more work then most people think. Its a skillset that take time to get good at. So thats not something you should focus on as a upcoming fighter.

    You can do something of a hybrid. Hitting the cloves of your sparring partner. Some call it dutch drills because every kickboxing gym in Holland do it. But its a normal drill done in just about every country. And it kinda gives the same stuff as padwork. But its also closer to real sparring and fighting.
     
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  18. eternaldarkness

    eternaldarkness Brown Belt

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    As long as they aren't catching jabs with their left hand.(orthodox vs orthodox)
     
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