Proper execution of 1,2 combo

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Grey Kid, May 20, 2008.

  1. Grey Kid Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey gents,

    I just have a question regarding the jab cross combo that has been bugging me for awhile.

    My boxing coach tells me: Always step into a punch, i.e the stutter step.

    meanwhile my Muay Thai coach tells me: When throwing a one two, the right cross should be thrown as the jab is retracting.

    These two pieces of advice come to a bit of conflict, let me explain-

    When I take a short step into my jab, the natural reaction is to connect with the jab as the lead foot hits the ground. Once I am back in a stance, I then step forward with the lead foot while I come across with my right. In this way, it is two punches thrown in quick succession, with a slight step for each punch.

    However, if I follow the instructions of my Muay Thai coach, I find it awkward to throw the right cross as I am retracting my jab while stepping at the same time. If I do that, it literally becomes a stepping jab, then before the jab is fully retracted, I am stepping again and throwing my right.

    Am I missing something here? What are your tips/advice/opinions? Thanks
     
  2. Luke Bucknell Amateur Fighter

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Melbourne
    if you're throwing it as a combo you don't want to be 'going back to your stance' before each punch. when you throw the right cross leave the left foot where it is and pivot on your right foot (turn the knee in) and throw the hip/shoulder forward with the punch
     
  3. phengeng Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Melbourne

    this sounds correct. No need to step back and back out for the cross....i see no advantage in doing this and would be very slow.
     
  4. Grey Kid Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks.

    Would I be correct in saying-

    1-Throw the stutter step jab.

    2-Leave lead foot where it is.

    3-Start to throw the right cross as jab is slightly more than halfway retracted.

    4-Throw right cross as per usual.
     
  5. phengeng Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Melbourne

    that sounds good except i would throw the right cross when the jab is almost fully retracted. It should be smooth and flowly..not like a jab....pause..cross. It should be continuous.
     
  6. C-H-L Cool Hand (Just the Flu)ke

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    Messages:
    69,982
    Likes Received:
    3,882
    i sorta remember being confused about this too when i started training

    i think whether or not you stutter step is dependent on if you are being the aggressor or not

    what i do when moving forward i.e being aggressive

    - step forward with left
    - connect with jab
    - right foot follows (sliding almost)
    - throw cross and pivot

    so technically your right foot is coming forward (sliding) until you pivot

    if you are not being the agressor i.e countering, then i would say your muay thai's instructor instruction is correct
     
  7. Grey Kid Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you for the prompt and sagely advice.
     
  8. C-H-L Cool Hand (Just the Flu)ke

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    Messages:
    69,982
    Likes Received:
    3,882
    yes for me at least

    the right foot comes forward so you dont have too wide of a stance.

    pivot is the most important part for power behind your cross
     
  9. ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2007
    Messages:
    3,775
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    nowhere close to somewhere
    Good advice! any steps before/during the combination should just be used to get into range. Remeber, your cross reaches a bit farther than your jab. In short, if you step in and crowd yourself on the jab your cross will be useless, unless your opponent is moving backwards.

    My favorite way to throw a 1-2 combo, assuming my opponent holds his rear hand near his cheek like he should, is to throw the jab at my opponents rear hand and make contact near the end of my jab range, then quick cross down the chute. Works all the time, they either try to parry the jab (which is thrown wide for a reason) and open up for the cross or you end up hitting their glove and leaving an easy shot at their chin with your cross. Practicing this will also help you learn your range!
     
  10. Michael Wanaka Amateur Fighter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    The 1-2 is classically thrown with one step. I.e. You step with your lead foot with the jab, and as you throw the 2 your back foot slides forward.
     
  11. Rbagu3 <img src="http://img524.imageshack.us/img524/7992/

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    8,249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fight City, USA
    pretty much how i'd put it
     
  12. ambertch Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,331
    Likes Received:
    0
    But really, there's just infinite ways to throw boxing combos - I mean that's the beauty of boxing.

    Even on this one-two, say you've "came in" behind a stepping jab and you're now in punching range. You jab without taking a step and he pulls a little back to avoid it. You then throw your two with a LEAD leg step to extend the range of that punch beyond what he might be expecting
     
  13. fightingrabbit Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Messages:
    13,184
    Likes Received:
    0
    a good one-two is all about good timing IMO.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.