Most Common Way I get Passed

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by clarkgriswold, Nov 24, 2005.

  1. clarkgriswold

    clarkgriswold White Belt

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    I guess I could use tips generally for defending guard/defending against being passed. I'm about 10% working sweeps or subs from the guard, 90% just getting passed. I read something on a thread somewhere about framing arms properly to fend off passes, and maybe that should be common sense after training a while, but I haven't really gotten a sense of how and where to frame my arms to fend off passes well and I guess recover guard.

    But the most common way I get passed is my opponent will break and get one of my legs pinned to the ground kinda with a stiff arm, slide either knee over top of it, across the thigh area, then either slide the inside one over and through if the outside one started over or swing the other one up and over and then finish getting the first one through. I don't know if I described that well enough for some thoughts on countering/stopping that kind of pass in particular.

    I tried to think through what I should do myself after training the other day, as I can't reason through while rolling so well, I was thinking maybe I need to work on switching to other open guard types but I'm beginner enough that I'm not good with spider guards or de la riva guards or stuff like that and barely even know what they are. I guess I also need to try to see this particular pass coming and back out a bit so my leg is not pinned right there in front of my opp to slide his knee right over? But I also feel like that will make me even easier to pass...

    Sorry for the long post. I'll stop guessing what I should do and take some tips. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. VTJas81

    VTJas81 Blue Belt

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    Your job being on the bottom is to break his posture. If he is sitting back and your not actively trying to collapse him back onto you then your making it a lot easier for him. If for example he was pushing down on your right leg with his left arm then come up, grab his left wrist, yank it off, and jerk your lower body toward your upper( one reason to have a strong core section). That should bring him forward onto you and you can over under grip his arms.
     
  3. colinm

    colinm Brown Belt

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    although i know a couple counters to particular guard passes, defending guard passes once they've already started is basically just a game of keeping a frame - usually across the collar bone, but you can push off of heads, shoulders, whatever - and moving your hips out to create space and recover your guard. for your question, you should prevent him from pinning you leg down by switching to another guard - simply don't let him start the pass. its usually a good idea to switch to another guard as soon as you feel your closed guard will be broken. good luck with the training, stick to it.
     
  4. Big Red

    Big Red Green Belt

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    That's exactly how I feel. I don't see the point in being stubborn & trying to re close your guard if it is failing. I feel the same with techniques, if something isn't working, try something else.
     
  5. VTJas81

    VTJas81 Blue Belt

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    yeah but the guy is a beginner. If he learns other guards, his closed guard will still suck. Basics first
     
  6. thecas

    thecas Blue Belt

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    I had a tough time with this guy too. His upper arm is as long as his forearm, so he always does the elbow pressure pass easily.
     

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