kajukenbo

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by VegasFighter**, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. VegasFighter**

    VegasFighter** Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    4,760
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Look at the name
  2. aaron_mag

    aaron_mag Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,702
    Likes Received:
    15
    I think the place where I take Sambo used to be a Kajukenbo school. Now they do Kung Fu, Tai Chi, and Sambo (the classes are totally separate from each other. The guys who do Sambo (like myself) pretty much only do Sambo)).

    Kajukenbo sounds good. But the problem with any blended style is that you can lose the focus of getting good at one thing...
     
  3. VegasFighter**

    VegasFighter** Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    4,760
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Look at the name
    it seems like a good overall skill to learn for MMA. if you could find anywhere that teaches it
     
  4. vadrip

    vadrip Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    0
    A got a video of a workshop the Kajukenbo had from Puerto Rico and it's basically kempo karate, they had forms and it generally kaate/kungfu standup, they have little to no groundwork.
     
  5. Bubble Boy

    Bubble Boy Black Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    6,974
    Likes Received:
    13
    Yes. I took Kajukenbo for about 6 months a while back, and I experienced exactly what vadrip stated above. Zero groundwork, minimal throws, and lot's of hong kong fooey standup stuff. I think the original idea of a mixed style was great, but seems to me they lost sight of that and just became another variation of Kempo. My 2 cents.
     
  6. MTJJ_PuMpED

    MTJJ_PuMpED Guest

  7. aaron_mag

    aaron_mag Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,702
    Likes Received:
    15
    I think that happens whenever you get a 'mixed style'. See there is only so much time in a class. So you work out a routine and the students only get good at those things you worked at. The founders of the style might have had a Judo background, but the students will not have all of that groundwork experience. So when they start teaching the art becomes very limited.

    That is why I kind of shake my head when I see things like a TKD class that is going to start incorporating groundfighting. Doing that is not going to make good ground fighters. It will only turn out people who are half-assed in both kicking and groundfighting.

    It would be better for a school who wanted to mix styles to teach each separately at different times. This way the different elements are given the attention they deserve...
     
  8. VegasFighter**

    VegasFighter** Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    4,760
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Look at the name
    it said it had jiu jitsu, but not enough i guess
     
  9. dapunisher

    dapunisher Guest

    I agree with what your saying, why incorporate groundfighting into a tkd style class just to appease whomever. If your teaching TKD, teach TKD. Everything and everyone doesnt have to be an mma fighter or a ring oriented technique.
     
  10. vadrip

    vadrip Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    0
    It depends if the people teaching have a good base to teach from and know how to incoporate things, it's not a matter of being an MMA fighter or whatever it can just be a martial art and not a combat sport.
     
  11. aaron_mag

    aaron_mag Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,702
    Likes Received:
    15
    I agree. According to the website you've got five 'masters' in different arts that formed a whole new art. If they truly were very good you probably got awesome instruction from them.

    But as time passed you had the students who only knew a little about each of those arts. And because there is limited class time they probably focused the class time on some of the arts more than others (in this case it sounds like Kempo). So soon you have a style that is claiming to be a blending of many styles and yet the students never practice Judo throws (just as an example, I don't really know what they practice and what they don't).

    My point is if someone wants to have well-rounded training they should train multiple arts (and they can even be all at the same location). But don't form a new style (say Rexkwon-do ;) ) that tries to mix them all together and not give proper focus to each one.
     
  12. waimeakauai

    waimeakauai White Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2003
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    i did kajukenbo for a few years when i was younger. i'd say it has some self defense value on the street as far as the throws and locks were concerned. there was some weapon disabling stuff as well. but for the ring it would full on suck. i do muay thai now and i look back and think of how corny it was.
     
  13. SideofKO

    SideofKO Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    3,325
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Louisville, Ky
    ... --- ... / ... --- ... Morse code is fun!

    Just kidding. Kabuki, or whatever the name is sounds "Mcdojoish" by the sound of things but you never know. I like to give things the benefit of the doubt sometimes... sometimes.
     
  14. Madmick

    Madmick Cerebrage Staff Member Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Messages:
    40,505
    Likes Received:
    33,606
    Location:
    NorCal
    I didn't read your article, but I read that Kajukenbo is the Marine's form of hand-to-hand. They call it LINE, but it's supposedly the same thing, or a just a little modified.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.